Author Topic: Northern Permaculture  (Read 6288 times)

ilinda

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #60 on: June 27, 2017, 02:17:23 PM »
Several times I've tried to grow this beauty, and without much success, but after reading your article, maybe mine needed more moisture, and a bit of shade.  It was planted each time in full sun in the middle of the garden and now I realize in part shade in herb garden near watering barrel would work better.

Thanks for posting!

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #61 on: July 18, 2017, 02:15:32 PM »
Anise hyssop, also known as licorice mint, giant blue hyssop and agastache, is neither mint nor licorice, but gets a 5 star edibility rating by PFAF.  The website says that leaves and flowers may be eaten raw or used as a seasoning in salads or cooked foods.  A tea made from the leaves is said to be medicinal for colds, fevers, weak heart, and chest pain from coughing.  Leaves and stems can also be made into a poultice to treat burns. 

PFAF gives incorrect information about the hardiness zones, placing it exclusively in the South, a mistake that is corrected by readers in the comments section.  It should be hardy to at least zone 4.

The plant also belongs in bee nectary gardens. :)
« Last Edit: July 18, 2017, 04:42:25 PM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture: Sunchokes in the late summer garden
« Reply #62 on: August 12, 2017, 12:18:26 PM »
Posting a photo to show how much room sunchokes take up in the garden, necessitating their own patch.  They are the last flowers to bloom in our garden, usually right on the Autumnal Equinox.

ilinda

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #63 on: August 12, 2017, 05:57:50 PM »
Wow, do you ever have a nice batch of tubers for winter time eating.  Beautiful patch.

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #64 on: August 15, 2017, 12:24:19 PM »
https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/feb/02/jerusalem-artichokes-good-for-you

Jerusalem artichokes - These sweet and crunchy tubers are too often overlooked for far simpler and less flavoursome vegetables

Try this Jerusalem artichoke, hazelnut and goat's cheese tart recipe:

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/feb/02/jerusalem-artichoke-hazelnut-cheese-tart-recipe
...
Why Jerusalem artichokes are good for you

Joanna Blythman
Saturday 2 February 2013 02.00 EST

Jerusalem artichokes are a reason to be cheerful in January and February. Sweet and crunchy when raw, smooth and aromatic when cooked, these knobbly tubers shine like beacons on the lean, dark midwinter shopping list.

It's surprising they aren't a more commonplace seasonal vegetable. Jerusalem artichokes grow easily in the UK, displaying a dogged resistance to disease, a characteristic that endears them not only to organic growers, but also to consumers who'd prefer that their food didn't come with a garnish of pesticide. But their flavour is the clincher: more complex than the simple sugariness of carrots, more elegant than celeriac or parsnip.

There are, admittedly, a couple of bad points about Jerusalem artichokes. Either you must spend time cleaning them meticulously, or peel them generously. But since they are reliably cheap, we needn't consider that profligate. Then there's their oft‑reported habit of inducing flatulence. But surely a little hot air is worth it for a vegetable this special?

Why are they good for me?

Eat Jerusalem artichokes and you'll be topping up on important minerals. They are rich in iron to give you energy, along with potassium and vitamin B1, which support your muscles and nerves. Although they're sweet, their starchy fibre stops any spikes in blood sugar levels – indeed they have a lower glycemic index (GI) score than potatoes – and they aren't fattening.

Where to buy, what to pay?

A staple of organic veggie box schemes, and easy to find in traditional and farmers' markets, there's no guarantee you'll find them in supermarkets, but some do stock them. Expect to pay around £3.20-£3.50 per kilo.

Joanna Blythman is the author of What To Eat (Fourth Estate, £16.99). To order a copy for £11 with free UK p&p, go to guardianbookshop.co.uk

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #65 on: August 15, 2017, 01:17:00 PM »
Quote
Then there's their oft‑reported habit of inducing flatulence.

They need to be allowed to undergo several freezes while in the ground before being eaten, which is why they're best eaten any time between late autumn (Thanksgiving?) and early spring (before your first greens are available), as a traditional "starvation ration."  This will cause the inulin to be converted into fructose for better digestibility and assimilation. 

I can personally attest that I was in intense gastric distress the very first time I ate a plate of roasted 'chokes freshly harvested one September (when they were abundantly available but not converted) some years back.

The GI tract can also become accustomed to inulin over time.  I've found that eating Oikos Triple Zero yogurt daily (while it's still available) has acclimated my gut to inulin, which is one of the key "cheat" ingredients in the yogurt that allows Oikos to get away with claiming no sugar or fat in such a thickened product while using a carb in the ingredients.

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #66 on: October 09, 2017, 10:53:40 AM »
The muscadine grape (refer to earlier post) harvest is in progress.  Enough were picked to go with supper.  These are from the black cultivar that has a few small seeds, as well as the red seedless variety, both of which are cold-hardy. 
« Last Edit: October 09, 2017, 11:13:46 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #67 on: October 16, 2017, 05:56:50 PM »
Because Yamiken squash sprawl so widely and wildly, covering everything in their path, they are great for smothering out weeds, or at least things you want to think of as unwanted.  Today I harvested the entire patch after a mild frost which nipped tops of squash, but left tomatoes and peppers OK. 

Total count was 90 Yamiken, 89 of which are now indoors, and one remaining, having grown into the fence.  They need several weeks to cure, even if they have already turned their orange color, but since most of these still have some green, we will wait several months before eating.  They become sweeter as they mature and attain their final orange-y color.


R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #68 on: October 17, 2017, 03:08:35 PM »
Very impressive harvest Ilinda!  Do you just cure them in the sun, or do you do the bleach dip/alcohol dip before storage?

ilinda

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #69 on: October 17, 2017, 05:34:52 PM »
Very impressive harvest Ilinda!  Do you just cure them in the sun, or do you do the bleach dip/alcohol dip before storage?
They were left in the sun primarily for the pic.  But I do let them dry a bit before taking indoors, and have never done a bleach or alcohol dip for winter squash to be stored.  Maybe I should?