Author Topic: trees from cuttings  (Read 489 times)

Socrates

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trees from cuttings
« on: September 12, 2017, 01:50:23 PM »
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ilinda

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Re: trees from cuttings
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2017, 04:21:38 PM »
Check this out!
I previewed it and will view later as it looks good.  In the meantime, because I wasn't feeling qualified to root fig cuttings last year from one of the Seed Savers Exchange listings, I sent a bit of extra $ and asked if he would root them for me, which he did.

That was last spring, and when I received the two cuttings in spring of 2016, they were 1' or less tall.  I planted them and pampered them, and this year one of them has had one fig already, and now it has three new figs.  Our two much older fig trees,  transplanted last year, have not had any figs yet.  Attached is pic of one of the new fig trees, less than two years old.  The one on the left is the one producing figs.

R.R. Book

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Re: trees from cuttings
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2017, 05:58:40 PM »
What beauties Ilinda!  I tried growing the Brown Turkey fig in our garden several years ago, and got fruit the 2nd year, but it did not survive subsequent winters. Perhaps a more sheltered position might have helped, though I did wrap it in burlap. :(

With yours being in pots, do they come indoors for the winter?  They also seem to be sheltered by the cinderblocks, which might retain heat from the winter sun maybe?

Socrates

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willows and time
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2017, 11:00:16 PM »
There are, i believe, some 300 variaties of fig tree; one should obviously choose from those best suited to whatever conditions one has to offer. This is one of the reasons people need to work together, for it's just too much work for any one homestead to have many variaties of many kinds of fruit (trees).

Viewing some vids on rooting cuttings, i was kinda surprised no one's mentioning willow, since i learned years ago that willow's extremely fast growing ability can be used to make a solution in which one places cuttings that will then benefit by the (willow) growth hormones in the water. Perhaps these kind of additives (including ones bought in stores) are taken for granted?

Yesterday i also viewed a man with 2 very nice fig trees and he mentioned one needs to give it time. He now has tennisball size figs and trees full of them, but he said it's year 6 and it's the first year he's had this success.
[He mentioned using woodchips under the trees, as well as slash and dropping comfrey.]
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ilinda

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Re: trees from cuttings
« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2017, 05:20:08 PM »
What beauties Ilinda!  I tried growing the Brown Turkey fig in our garden several years ago, and got fruit the 2nd year, but it did not survive subsequent winters. Perhaps a more sheltered position might have helped, though I did wrap it in burlap. :(

With yours being in pots, do they come indoors for the winter?  They also seem to be sheltered by the cinderblocks, which might retain heat from the winter sun maybe?
The concrete blocks are the base for the "Olive House" and I'm slowly but surely stuffing the holes with straw, and each hole also gets a sharpened cedar pole to serve as rebar (Ozark rebar!)  Last winter the lowest temp we know of was 10 below zero, and a number of nights at 5 below zero.

The olives and figs were inside the Olive House, but each was covered in many layers of plastic.  OMG, it was almost ridiculous.  But here is another thing that really helped.  I surrounded each of the trees with plastic bottles of water, including as many gallon jugs of water.  Eventually the water in them froze for a while, but that served sort of like an igloo, as insulation against the even colder temp's exterior to the jugs of water.  There were so many layers of covering that it would take an hour to draw it all, but it did work.

But this year will be different because the olive trees have grown so much!  They could be covered with upside down flower pots last year but now they're several feet taller and the new greenhouse cover/olive house cover will have to be beefed up.  My research found that olive trees do not like 22 deg. F, but often survive it.  They do not survive 15 deg. F though, so I figured the key was keeping them at or above 22 deg. F.  And the figs are only slightly more tolerant of cold, so I treated them the same by putting the two new ones inside, sandwiched between the two olive trees.  I'll post a pic of one of the olives.

Figs in PA would probably survive if surrounded by enough heat sinks, plus several layers of plastic/glass, and maybe include those water jugs to surround the main trunk.

R.R. Book

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Re: trees from cuttings
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2017, 04:16:26 AM »
Great ideas, Ilinda, for insulation and thermal mass.  Also, thanks for mention of the cedar rebar poles.  We stacked cinderblocks into corner posts to anchor a makeshift metal roof over the haystack in back, but need to reinforce the cinderblocks themselves.

It's good to know that we can still enjoy some of what we have thought of as sub-tropical fruits, come ice age or crustal shift to the north :)