Author Topic: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food  (Read 4760 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2011, 10:02:32 AM »
P.S. from Barb Townsend aka Yowbarb:
The previously pictured grow dome's door would have to be reinforced in case of high winds, flooding
and etc.
A better door than that would be needed.

Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #16 on: May 07, 2012, 11:24:11 PM »
How to Grow Your Own Sweet Potato Slips/Plants  1:53 50,485 Views

VIDEO LINK: http://youtu.be/YzlzbNE7zE0

by Howcast on May 13, 2010
Discover best practices for growing sweet potatoes in your own backyard.

...
Planting Sweet Potatoes  7:28

VIDEO LINK: http://youtu.be/Gy7cI7ToH10

Uploaded by timjturner on Jul 6, 2011
I took advice from a channel subscriber and cut slips from existing sweet potato vines and document the root growth over eight days. I plant the slips in the garden on the eighth day. We will see how they do.
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Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #17 on: June 26, 2012, 02:09:40 AM »
http://tlc.howstuffworks.com/home/urban-gardening-potatoes-box.htm

You Can Grow 100 Lbs of Potatoes in a 4 Ft Box
by Brian Merchant

Who says you need a huge garden to grow a whole lot of potatoes? Nobody—at least not anymore. Turns out you can grow up to 100 lbs of potatoes, and all you need is a tiny 4 sq ft box.
Lifehacker has this great urban gardening idea that should appeal to green gardeners with yards of all sizes. To build your very own high yield potato box, all you'll need is 4 ft worth of space, some lumber, seed potatoes, and some green TLC.
The most innovative thing about this project is how you build the box while the potatoes grow, to maximize yield while minimizing space. Basically, you start by laying the foundation?four wooden pillars at the corner of your box-to-be and one layer of wood at the base?and then plant the potatoes four inches deep. Begin watering. As the vines grow, you add layer after layer to keep up with them, until you've hit four feet.
For a diagram that includes step by step directions on building the potato box, check out LifeHacker's How-To:
http://lifehacker.com/5202849/grow-100-lbs-of-potatoes-in-4-square-feet


To harvest your potatoes, you simply remove the bottom layer and carefully remove your bounty.
It's a perfect way to get a load of potatoes with a little space.
MORE ON URBAN GARDENING

step by step directions on building the potato box:

http://lifehacker.com/5202849/grow-100-lbs-of-potatoes-in-4-square-feet

Grow 100 lbs. of Potatoes in 4 Square Feet
Potatoes seem like the kind of plant you'd need a substantial garden for—the kind your grandparents had, right? Actually, tubers aren't all that picky, and you can harvest a whole lot from almost any yard.

We're big fans of growing delicious food in little spaces. We've shown you how to grow tomatoes in a self watering planter, turn your fence into a vegetable trellis, and start a container garden. Now we've got a great tip to share, courtesy of The Seattle Times, on how to grow a lot of potatoes in a rather small space.

The Times' guide for building a potato growing box yields up to a 100 lbs. of potatoes in a mere 4 square feet. By planting your potatoes in layers within a tall box, as seen in the diagram here, you're essentially building a potato growing high rise. You can wait until the fall for a full harvest or if you're getting antsy for some garden fresh potatoes you can pop a board off the bottom and steal some of the mature potatoes. For more details and tips on getting a great yield, check out the full write up at the Seattle Times. If you have a trick up your sleeve for growing a lot of food in a little space, let's hear about it in the comments below!

It's Not Idaho, But You Can Still Grow Potatoes [via TipNut]


Sunnybug

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #18 on: June 26, 2012, 05:59:45 AM »
Great Find Yowbarb!
Thanks
Never Give UP! EVER

Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #19 on: June 26, 2012, 06:31:25 AM »
Great Find Yowbarb!
Thanks

Thanks Sunnybug,
this is an oldie but goodie repeat.  :)
Except this one has the diagram for building it...
- Yowbarb

family times41607

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #20 on: June 26, 2012, 06:46:44 AM »
  Nice plan, been doing that for a few yrs. just never thought about it as a option.  It works good, just have to watch that the potatoes at the bottom do not rot before you can get them.  We use this method in a green house effect, we can keep potatoes going all year round by using the rot potatoes and moving them to a new bin.  Basically every 3 months, you have a new batch growing. We also use the rot potatoes,(seed potatoes) vines, stalks ect, in the compost bin, keeps fresh dirt ready to go.  The problem is the bugs that get moved from bin to bin.  We tried straining, sifting to try to remove them.  If you do not get them all the potatoes rot fast.  Good luck to all

Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #21 on: June 27, 2012, 02:14:15 PM »
  Nice plan, been doing that for a few yrs. just never thought about it as a option.  It works good, just have to watch that the potatoes at the bottom do not rot before you can get them.  We use this method in a green house effect, we can keep potatoes going all year round by using the rot potatoes and moving them to a new bin.  Basically every 3 months, you have a new batch growing. We also use the rot potatoes,(seed potatoes) vines, stalks ect, in the compost bin, keeps fresh dirt ready to go.  The problem is the bugs that get moved from bin to bin.  We tried straining, sifting to try to remove them.  If you do not get them all the potatoes rot fast.  Good luck to all

Thanks for this info!
- Yowbarb

Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #22 on: May 16, 2013, 07:54:05 PM »
Mother Earth News

http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/garden-trellises-zmaz06jjzsto.aspx

Country Lore: Grow More Food With Garden Trellises Use a simple trellis system and train your crops to grow vertically. You will ultimately harvest much more food! 
By Kevin Wright   June/July 2006

I recently began my own small backyard market garden. Pressed for space, I needed a way to gain more area to produce the vegetables I plan to sell at local farmers markets.

I began using a trellis system, which is great for many kinds of vegetables. Pole beans, of course, work on a trellis, but have you tried cucumbers? On a trellis, cucumbers grow long and straight and leave a lot more ground for other plantings. A strong trellis also can be used for some small melon varieties. The melons will maintain their naturally round shape, and keeping them off the ground discourages rot and keeps some critters at bay. Heavy tomato vines also can be trained to grow along a trellis.

Place your trellises in garden areas where they will receive ample sunlight, but not where the trellises will shade your other plants. I put mine on the south side of the garden, giving all my plants dawn-to-dusk sunlight.

To make a trellis, a heavy gauge of fencing material works best. My trellises are just over 6 feet high, with the bottom of the fencing attached 1 foot up the fence stake.

Kevin Wright
Canton, Illinois

Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/garden-trellises-zmaz06jjzsto.aspx#ixzz2TVyVBtjq

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Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #23 on: May 16, 2013, 08:05:21 PM »
A vertical veggie garden. This is somewhere in Europe.
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http://www.buzzfeed.com/marcelle/39-insanely-cool-vertical-gardens

Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #24 on: June 03, 2013, 10:55:20 PM »
http://bonnieplants.com/herb-gardening/

Why Herbs Belong in Your Garden

When it comes to versatility, herb are hard to beat. They provide wonderful fragrance, add delicious flavor to your favorite dishes, look beautiful in your yard (hello, edible landscaping!), attract pollinators, can be dried for use throughout the year – the list goes on and on. Plus, they’re easy to grow and care for. So what are you waiting for? Check out Bonnie’s wide selection of herbs to find just the right ones for your garden.

http://bonnieplants.com/products/herbs

Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #25 on: October 19, 2013, 05:00:03 AM »
http://floyderdog.blogspot.com/2010_07_01_archive.html

http://www.csmonitor.com/Business/The-Simple-Dollar/2010/0826/Is-your-garden-going-to-seed-Good

A Skyscraper Garden features climbing vegetables, from left to right: Trombone zucchini, Early Cascade tomatoes, and Orient Express climbing cucumbers. It's easier than you think to grow your own food, and it starts with saving (or finding) the seeds.

Derek Fell/Skyscrapergarden AP/file

 

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