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Author Topic: Kudzu  (Read 14660 times)

Linda

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #15 on: May 04, 2011, 08:05:17 PM »
Kudzu may be a good camouflage plant to create cover at your shelter. Not too sure how long it takes to grow, but seems like it's a pretty fast grower.

 
Linda :)

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #16 on: May 04, 2011, 08:08:09 PM »
Kudzu may be a good camouflage plant to create cover at your shelter. Not too sure how long it takes to grow, but seems like it's a pretty fast grower.

Linda,
great idea! Does anyone know if it would make a good firebreak or if it is resistant to fire like ice plants? Well I will try and find out...

ivanm

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #17 on: May 06, 2011, 12:43:05 AM »
Hi all,
I don't know if you are aware,but Kudzu is used to treat alcohol addiction.
It has recently been discovered.
( just a bit of information i thought you should know)
Kind regards .....Ivan.

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #18 on: May 06, 2011, 10:59:21 AM »
Hi all,
I don't know if you are aware,but Kudzu is used to treat alcohol addiction.
It has recently been discovered.
( just a bit of information i thought you should know)
Kind regards .....Ivan.

I did post a reference on that... I should post it in one of the herbal topics, not sure if I did.
In the aftertimes it could be a Godsend to all the addicted people who cannot get their booze or drugs...

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #19 on: March 14, 2012, 07:46:08 AM »
I need to get a cow or a goat.  Its taking over my yard. :D

Probably feed a whole bunch of goats...

Belated reply kudzu seeds would be a good idea... then just let it run rampant and let goats and other domestic animals feed on it, use some of it for vegetables. Cook it can it..

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #20 on: February 18, 2013, 10:42:45 PM »
Corey Webb Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Webbspun Ideas

Tuesday, July 31, 2007
Goats Employed in Fight Against Kudzu in the South

http://webbspunideas.blogspot.com/2007_07_01_archive.html

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #21 on: February 19, 2013, 04:38:20 AM »
http://www.horsegroomingsupplies.com/horse-forums/did-you-know-kudzu-is-safe-horses-145227.html

Discuss Did you know Kudzu is safe for horses? at the Horse Health forum - Horse Forums.
 According to the North Carolina State University Equine Vetrinary College, kudzu is a safe forage/roughage ...


Limited availability of traditional horse hays may necessitate feeding non-traditional forage sources. Horses can effectively graze kudzu, which is similar in protein and energy to immature graze hay. Overgrazing and destruction of the kudzu is encouraged. Other alternative forage sources that can be fed if properly harvested at an immature stage are:

DE(mcal/lb) CP% Ca% P%Oat Hay .79 8.6 .29 .23Wheat Hay .76 7.7 .13 .18Soybean Hay .79 9.9 1.12 .14Peanut Hay .85 14 1.10 .20
 Access the fact sheet entitled "Selecting Feedstuffs for Horses" on this web site. Obtain a feed analysis before feeding alternative hays. When the nutrient content and feed quality is confirmed, alternative forage sources can be substituted pound-for-pound with traditional hay sources.
 
...I don't know about everyone else but kudzu completely overruns parts of the South. I am seriously considering bringing some home and exposing my horses to it. IT grows faster than grass, is more nutritous than most of the grass types in my pasture, and could save me thousands in hay bills.
 
Anyone else heard of or tried this?
 
(source: NCSU: Animal Science - Extension Horse Husbandry, Horse Fact Sheets)


"Riding a horse is not a gentle hobby, to be picked up and laid down like a game of Solitaire. It is a grand passion." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

http://www.ashelynmorgans.com

Survival101

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #22 on: February 19, 2013, 05:51:39 AM »

Kudzu is a very invasive and dangerous plant, because it can't be controlled. In many parts of the country it is illegal to introduce these plants/seeds, because of that. Yes, goats love it, pigs, too, other livestock will eat it. but what happens when they don't for some reason, it's very drought tolerant, but when it isn't the 'stuf' will overrun everything in a very short time, then what...??? Yes, humans can eat it, too, but do you just want to eat Kudzu, because you'd have to. It would quickly cover and suffocate anything else. Kudzu was imported and we don't have any natural predators to manage it, as good as some features are, it's very bad in others. Best not to tempt and tip the balance. The Aftertimes will bring enough trouble in trying to grow good crops and things, as it is...

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #23 on: February 19, 2013, 07:36:17 AM »

Kudzu is a very invasive and dangerous plant, because it can't be controlled. In many parts of the country it is illegal to introduce these plants/seeds, because of that. Yes, goats love it, pigs, too, other livestock will eat it. but what happens when they don't for some reason, it's very drought tolerant, but when it isn't the 'stuf' will overrun everything in a very short time, then what...??? Yes, humans can eat it, too, but do you just want to eat Kudzu, because you'd have to. It would quickly cover and suffocate anything else. Kudzu was imported and we don't have any natural predators to manage it, as good as some features are, it's very bad in others. Best not to tempt and tip the balance. The Aftertimes will bring enough trouble in trying to grow good crops and things, as it is...

Survival101 (I posted to you also in the horses Topic.) At this point, no I am not advocating people plant it.
The point of me starting this topic is, to provide some info on where kudzu came from why it is invasive etc. Not only that, how to make use of part of it, if it is on your land.

There are already lots of blogs on how to kill it and so on.

My point is, if it is on your land, make use of it.
It is already understood everyone has the option to kill it off their land. It is already understood it is invasive and why.
 
I suppose if I had a large plot of land in the southeast:
•   I would use non - poison methods to beat back the kudzu on property line.
•   Then I would have some wild goats in the areas I didn't go to much.
•   They would continuously feed on the kudzu.
•   The vines closest to my home I would harvest and use.
•   Human food and feed it to my animals.
•   I’m thinking a lot of it could be shredded in a wood chopper and ploughed under to nourish the soil –
•   in that case you wouldn't be dumping poison on those portions gathered up for that reason.
•   Could someone make an organic compost/fertilizer out of it?
•   In that case the person could hire a few people to gather it up for processing.

I prefer to focus on kudzu as a resource, particularly since people could still face more catastrophes
and famine in the coming few years.

Think about it - an edible plant that is virtually unkillable. Well that could come in handy in the aftermath of fire,
flood and who knows what.

Just some thoughts.
- Yowbarb
......

Survival101

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #24 on: February 19, 2013, 08:27:54 AM »

Yes, Kudzu could be a resource to use in certain ways and for specific uses, if it is already present. However, the concept seems to migrate and not stay with just the intended purpose and then it's out of control. We can eat it, animals can eat it, neither can eat it continuously, tho'. Mono-diets are not good for any creature and the way it grows, you'd pretty much have to be. Goats are 'browsers' they are mainly looking for brush. You can process it into useful products, if you have the means. For whatever purpose intended for, if it is ever not utilitized, 'it' keeps growing and it grows at an alarming rate.

Many people with good intentions have tried to work with Kudzu, thinking that 'they' had the way, that 'they' could handle it and found out, otherwise to their determent. Others have built companies, thinking 'they' had the answer to the Kudzu problem by leasing out goats, etc. to eat the Kudzu, they don't stay in operation very long for whatever reasons.

Shredding Kudzu and ploughing it under, makes a lot of new, little plants. Composting could be an answer, but it would definitely have to be and stay HOT enough, long enough to kill it. I don't know of anyone that, once they have experienced Kudzu, wanting Kudzu. In spite, of it's attractive benefits short-term, in the long run it's not worth it and has a high potential/risk for one, of even more.

Yes, it can be used, Kudzu is certainly the Siren's Song. But, eventually, it will win out and use and control you and everything around it.   

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #25 on: February 19, 2013, 09:31:22 AM »
Excerpts from this site,
Yowbarb
.........................................................................................

http://www.maxshores.com/kudzu/

The Amazing Story of Kudzu
Love It, Or Hate It... It Grows On You!

 In Georgia, the legend says
That you must close your windows
At night to keep it out of the house.
The glass is tinged with green, even so...

From the poem, "Kudzu,"
by James Dickey

..........
Uses for Kudzu:
It's here. It's free... Why not?

Basket makers have found that the rubber-like vines are excellent for decorative and functional creations. Ruth Duncan of Greenville, Alabama makes over 200 kudzu baskets each year and says she doesn't mind that people call her the "Queen of Kudzu."

Regina Hines of Ball Ground, Georgia, has developed unique basket styles which incorporate curled kudzu vines. She weaves with other vines as well, but says that kudzu is the most versatile.

Nancy Basket of Walhalla, South Carolina, makes paper from kudzu which she uses in colorful collages. Her designs vary from geometric shapes to images of rural life and Native American themes.

Diane Hoots of Dahlonega, Georgia has developed a company to market her kudzu products which include kudzu blossom jelly and syrup, kudzu baskets, and books. Her book, Kudzu: The Vine to Love or Hate, co-written with Juanita Baldwin, is an in-depth study of the South's love/hate relationship with the vine. The book includes recipes and basket making instructions.

Henry and Edith Edwards of Rutherfordton, North Carolina have found many uses for kudzu over the past 30 years. Henry produces over 1,000 bales of kudzu hay each year on his Kudzu Cow Farm. The hay is high in nutritive value, but many people have found kudzu difficult to cut and bale. Henry says the secret is to "cut it low and bale it high."

Edith Edwards makes deep-fried kudzu leaves, kudzu quiche, and many other kudzu dishes. She found recipes in The Book of Kudzu: A Culinary and Healing Guide by William Shurtleff and Akiko Aoyagi, and thought this was a good use for a plentiful resource. She has demonstrated kudzu cooking for clubs, schools, and visitors to the Knoxville World's Fair.

........
- Yowbarb

.........

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #26 on: November 10, 2013, 11:05:13 AM »

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #27 on: October 28, 2016, 11:47:27 PM »
My newer Topic: Topic: Kudzu: You can eat "the plant that ate the south."

Link: http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=4453.msg61214#msg61214

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu
« Reply #28 on: November 06, 2016, 06:10:54 AM »
Yowbarb Note: This is a pretty standard medical site. Will be posting more from alternative sources.
...
http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/addiction/news/20120517/chinese-herb-kudzu-may-help-drinkers-cut-down

Chinese Herb Kudzu May Help Drinkers Cut Down
In Small Study, Harvard Researchers Find Kudzu Extract Reduces Drinking

ALSO: Kudzu: A Brief History
In Chinese pharmacy books, kudzu is listed as a possible treatment for alcohol-related hangovers and cravings, Penetar tells WebMD.

"Some of the references go back to 600 A.D.," he says.

Today, it's used in China and other countries to treat coronary problems and blood-flow problems, Penetar says. "It has a good safety record already."

It's touted as a hangover remedy. However, studies looking at the effects of kudzu extracts have produced mixed findings, Penetar says

 

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