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Author Topic: Northern lights viewed in northern Europe  (Read 20198 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern lights viewed in northern Europe
« Reply #60 on: March 16, 2014, 03:51:48 PM »
Absolutely breathtaking!  Thanks for posting it Barb!   ;D
:)
Here's more...
.....................................................
http://spaceweather.com/
AURORA STORM - G1  in Saariselkä, a mountain village in northern Finland by Juan Carlos Casado March 12th 2014

Full -sized image:  http://spaceweather.com/images2014/15mar14/aurorastorm.jpg?PHPSESSID=dt38u7ctt1ctt514q4uu2rro12

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern lights viewed in northern Europe
« Reply #61 on: October 19, 2014, 09:51:00 PM »
http://www.spaceweather.com/

EMERALD DYNAMITE:
On Oct. 18th, Earth passed through multiple folds in the heliospheric current sheet--a phenomenon known as "solar sector boundary crossings." This sparked a veritable explosion of bright auroras around the Arctic Circle. Ole Salomonsen of Tromso, Norway, captured the outburst in this photo, which he calls Emerald Dynamite.

"This is one of many spectacular auroral displays I captured tonight," says Salomonsen. "There were red auroras, green auroras, coronas, fast moving purple bands... It was the most amazing display I have witnessed in a long time."

More auroras are in the offing. NOAA forecasters expect additional solar sector boundary crossings on Oct. 19th with a 30% chance of polar geomagnetic storms before the weekend is over.
 

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern lights viewed in northern Europe
« Reply #62 on: October 29, 2014, 11:33:46 PM »
http://www.spaceweather.com/

Image/Video: Aurora Borealis in Abisko National Park. October 24th 2014
from Lights Over Lapland

PULSATING GREEN WAVE: Aurora tour guide Chad Blakley of Sweden's Abisko National Park has spent thousands of nights under the stars watching green lights dance overhead. But he has never seen any quite like these. Click on the arrow to set the scene in motion:  http://vimeo.com/110053840

"We are out in the National Park chasing the Northern Lights almost every single night between September and April so we have grown accustomed to watching powerful auroras dance overhead," says Blakley. "Among all those displays, October 24th was unique and unforgettable. As our group approached one of my favorite photo-spots, we noticed a beautiful strand of auroras stretching from one horizon to another. As the display grew, the strands slowly developed into a pulsating wave of flashing green lights. I can honestly say that I have never seen anything like this in all of the years that I have been photographing the sky!"

More auroras are in the offing. On Oct. 30th Earth is expected to cross a fold in the heliospheric current sheet-- http://wso.stanford.edu/gifs/HCS.html also known as a "solar sector boundary crossing." NOAA forecasters estimate a 40% chance of polar geomagnetic storms when this occurs

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern lights viewed in northern Europe
« Reply #63 on: November 24, 2014, 12:22:36 AM »
http://www.spaceweather.com/    http://www.eiscat.com/about/whatiseiscat_new

AURORA OUTBURST: On Sunday night, a bright display of auroras erupted around the Arctic Circle. Ole Salomonsen photographed the outburst behind EISCAT's ionospheric radar in Tromsø, Norway.  Photo: Massive Auroras
{ Taken by Ole Salomonsen on November 23, 2014 @ EISCAT, Tromsø, Norway
 http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=104876 }

"After a long day of photographing whales at sea, I was looking forward to relaxing in the evening, but Lady aurora invited me out, and I could not resist," says Salomonsen. "After quickly getting new batteries and memory cards for my camera, I went out hunting, this time for the magic emerald light. The entire sky was filled with majestic moving green auroras. At times there were 4 to 5 arcs stretching from east to west next to each other in the sky. This was really amazing to watch!"

Spaceweather: Bright auroras are often caused by CME impacts, but there was no CME on Sunday. Instead, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) near Earth tilted south. This opened a crack in Earth's magnetosphere. Solar wind poured in to fuel the display.

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern lights viewed in northern Europe
« Reply #64 on: December 12, 2014, 08:34:39 AM »
Photo at bottom of this post:
Auroras Taken by Chad Blakley on December 9, 2014 @ Abisko National Park, Sweden
http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=105130

http://www.spaceweather.com/  Spaceweather .com      Auroras

THE NITROGEN FRINGE: On Dec. 9th, aurora tour guide Chad Blakley of Sweden's Abisko National Park was warming up inside a Sami hut, when he looked through the door and noticed the snow turning green. "I rushed outside," he says, "and discovered one of the most beautiful aurora displays I had ever seen dancing overhead." In addition to green, there was a rare and remarkable fringe of pink.

It was the "nitrogen fringe." Most auroras are green--a verdant glow caused by energetic particles from space hitting oxygen atoms 100 km to 300 km above Earth's surface. Seldom-seen pink appears when the energetic particles descend lower than usual, striking nitrogen molecules at the 100 km level and below.

"For almost five minutes, fast-moving pink auroras streaked across the sky," says Blakley. "I have been photographing the Northern Lights for years, and I can honestly say that this was the brightest pink aurora I have ever seen." Using two cameras, he recorded a pair of must-see videos: #1, #2.

Arctic sky watchers should be alert for more pink in the nights ahead. NOAA forecasters estimate a 55% chance of polar geomagnetic storms on Dec. 13-14

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern lights viewed in northern Europe
« Reply #65 on: January 01, 2015, 01:13:47 AM »
http://www.spaceweather.com/

"It's not often that you can look out the window during lunch and see auroras cutting across the blue sky. It happened yesterday in Svalbard, a Norwegian archipelago in the Arctic Ocean."

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern lights viewed in northern Europe
« Reply #66 on: January 02, 2015, 03:01:21 AM »
http://www.spaceweather.com/

FIRST AURORAS OF 2015: Not long after the clock struck midnight on Dec. 31st, ringing in the New Year, Rayann Elzein saw a luminous green ribbon cutting across the sky above Kaamanen, Finland.

"Perfect way to start the year with the first auroras of 2015!" says Elzein. "A few meteors were also visible, and one was caught on camera."

The combination of meteors and auroras Elzein saw on Jan. 1st could foreshadow the nights of Jan. 3rd and 4th when Earth is expected to pass through (1) a stream of debris from shattered comet 2003 EH1 and (2) a stream of high-speed solar wind flowing from a southern coronal hole on the sun. The double encounter could spark beautiful Northern Lights during the annual Quadrantid meteor shower. NOAA forecasters estimate a 40% chance of polar geomagnetic storms this weekend. Photo:

Aurora And Meteor Taken by Rayann Elzein on January 1, 2015 @ Kaamanen, Finland 

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern lights viewed in northern Europe
« Reply #67 on: March 01, 2015, 12:26:44 PM »
http://www.spaceweather.com/  SOLAR WIND SPARKS NORTHERN LIGHTS:
A solar wind stream hit Earth's magnetic field during the late hours of Feb. 28th, causing compass needles to swerve and sparking bright auroras around the Arctic Circle. Mika-Pekka Markkanen was exploring a cave in Iceland when the G1-class geomagnetic storm peaked. He looked out and took this picture:  http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=109367

"Simply wow!" says Markkanen. "It was a spectacular display. I got so many wonderful shots from different locations during one night that its bit overwhelming!"

The storm has subsided, but only temporarily. Earth is still inside the solar wind stream, so more auroras are in the offing. NOAA forecasters estimate a 60% chance of polar geomagnetic storms on March 1-2. 
Aurora alerts  Text     http://spaceweathertext.com/
                     Voice   http://spaceweatherphone.com/
........................................................................                               


Yowbarb

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Re: Northern lights viewed in northern Europe
« Reply #68 on: March 15, 2015, 05:00:23 PM »
http://spaceweathergallery.com/full_image.php?image_name=Oliver-Wright-FJ8R6633_1426399349.jpg

AURORA OUTBURST:
  Last night, March 14-15, sky watchers around the Arctic Circle witnessed a magnificent outburst of auroras. "It was utterly amazing," reports Oliver Wright of Abisko, Sweden. "Best I've seen in years of night photography." He took this picture just as the storm was getting started.

"Later, the auroras exploded and just filled the sky!" he said.

Chad Blakley, an aurora tour guide in Abisko National Park, says "I have seen some very impressive displays during all of the years that I have been living in Abisko, but this particular show was truly one of a kind." Using a high speed camera, he captured a must-see movie which Blakley says "closely represents what we saw with our own eyes."

Aurora outbursts are often caused by CMEs. In this case however, a CME was not responsible. Instead, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) around Earth tipped south. This opened a crack in Earth's magnetic field. Solar wind poured in to fuel the display.
 

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern lights viewed in northern Europe
« Reply #69 on: March 19, 2015, 11:38:21 PM »

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern lights viewed in northern Europe
« Reply #70 on: September 08, 2015, 01:31:25 AM »
http://www.spaceweather.com/

SOLAR WIND SPARKS BRIGHT AURORAS: For the second day in a row, a stream of solar wind is buffeting Earth's magnetic field. This has caused G2-class geomagnetic storms and bright auroras over parts of the USA and Europe. "Last night was epic," reports Ruslan Merzlyakov, who sends this picture from Nykøbing Mors, Denmark:

http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=117183

Aurora Borealis Taken by Ruslan Merzlyakov on September 8, 2015 @ Nykøbing Mors, Denmark

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Re: Northern lights viewed in northern Europe
« Reply #71 on: October 05, 2015, 12:07:49 PM »
Yowbarb Note: Be sure to click the actual upload it is lovely and much better photo quality than my screen shot. Click:

http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=118447&PHPSESSID=sm2c16r4in7bfgiatpg18rp174

http://www.spaceweather.com/

NO CME, AURORAS ANYWAY: A CME expected to hit Earth's magnetic field on Oct. 4th did not; it missed. Auroras appeared anyway. "The sky erupted into a multicolour flash of green and purple that will never be forgotten by anyone in our group," reports aurora tour guide Chad Blakley,who send this picture from Abisko, Sweden.

"While the display was likely not caused by the CME, it was a spectacular event, and was well worth the wait,"says Blakley. "Let's hope that the rest of the aurora season is as impressive!"

If the CME didn't make these auroras, what did? Answer: The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) near Earth tipped south. This opened a crack in our planet's magnetosphere. Solar wind poured in to fuel the display.

[Image:  Auroras Taken by Chad Blakley on October 4, 2015 @ Abisko National Park, Sweden  ]

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern lights viewed in northern Europe
« Reply #72 on: October 09, 2015, 01:03:12 PM »
http://www.spaceweather.com/

GREEN SKIES ON EARTH: Sky watchers around the Arctic Circle have experienced three straight nights of auroras that some veteran observers say is "the strongest" they've ever seen. "Mother Earth gave us a massive display of lights," reports Johnny Henriksen, who photographed this outburst over Harstad, Norway:

http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=118668

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern lights viewed in northern Europe
« Reply #73 on: October 12, 2015, 01:14:50 PM »
http://www.spaceweather.com/

IMAGE: http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=118824

Massive Auroras
Taken by Ole Salomonsen on October 9, 2015 @ Tromsø, Norway

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern lights viewed in northern Europe
« Reply #74 on: November 01, 2015, 01:15:41 AM »
http://www.spaceweather.com/

Image: Aurras
Taken by Anne Birgitte Fyhn on October 30, 2015 @ Kvaløya island, Tromsø, Norway

http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=119484
...
CME MISSES EARTH, AURORAS APPEAR ANYWAY: A CME expected to deliver a glancing blow to Earth's magnetic field on Oct. 30th did not. It missed. Sky watchers around the Arctic Circle saw auroras anyway. Anne Birgitte Fyhn sends this picture from Kvaløya island, Tromsø, Norway.

The partly cloudy weather made this evening extra exciting," says Fyhn. "I was lucky to witness a beautiful show where the auroras and the appearing clouds competed covering the stars."

Tromsø is just above the Arctic Circle where even gentle gusts of solar wind can spark Northern Lights--no CME required. More lights could be in the offing. NOAA forecasters say Earth is going to cross a fold in the heliospheric current sheet on Halloween (Oct. 31st), a crossing which could scare up some spooky auroras.

 

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