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Surviving the Planet X Tribulation

Author Topic: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?  (Read 107318 times)

Yowbarb

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Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #316 on: June 02, 2019, 12:23:24 AM »
Golden Age Women's Southern - 2019 Gathering of Nations Pow Wow

https://youtu.be/BDuhf6ZlGAk

PowWows.com
Published on May 31, 2019

Golden Age Women's Southern
2019 Gathering of Nations Pow Wow
April 26-27, 2019
Albuquerque, New Mexico

Find a Pow Wow near you  https://www.powwows.com/pow-wows-in-my-state-pow-wow-calendar/

ilinda

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #317 on: June 02, 2019, 02:41:07 PM »
U.S. Supreme Court got it right in Crow Tribe hunting case

American history is rife with examples of states and the federal government failing to honor treaties with Native American tribes. The courts have often been party to such egregious injustice.
But not last week. On May 20, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of a Crow tribal member from Montana in his case against Wyoming. The dispute turned on an 1868 treaty that gave the Crow Tribe the right to hunt off their reservation on unoccupied lands.
In 2014, tribal game warden Clayvin Herrera led his family on an Elk hunt. They started their expedition in Montana, where there was no question of their hunting rights. Things got messy though when they pursued their quarry across state lines and killed three elk in the Bighorn National Forest in Wyoming.
Wyoming saw this as an act of poaching and fined Herrera $8,000, placed him on probation for one year and banned him from hunting in the state for three years.
Herrera appealed his conviction but lost in state court and the Wyoming Supreme Court. His lawyers had argued that under the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty, the Crow Tribe was granted “the right to hunt on the unoccupied lands of the United States so long as game may be found thereon, and as long as peace subsists among the whites and Indians on the borders of the hunting districts.”

indianz.com
@indianz
 For Clayvin Herrera and other members of the Apsáalooke Nation, the Supreme Court’s tribal treaty decision vindicates a right they believe essential. #HonorTheTreaties http://www.indianz.com/News/2019/05/21/scotusblog-supreme-court-sides-with-crow.asp


8:48 PM - May 28, 2019

SCOTUSblog: Supreme Court sides with Crow hunter in treaty rights case
For Clayvin Herrera and other members of the Apsáalooke Nation, the Supreme Court’s decision vindicates a right they believe essential.

indianz.com
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But the state of Wyoming maintained that “as long as” doesn’t mean forever, and that the treaty was voided upon Wyoming’s statehood in 1890. And if the court wouldn’t buy that argument, state attorneys had another in their back pocket: The lands became “occupied” when the federal government turned them into a national forest.
“Wyoming statehood was not just a legal event, it was a recognition the once wild frontier was no more,” according to the state’s brief. “And the Crow Tribe understood that its hunting rights had ended.”
The nation’s highest court, however, didn’t swallow that spurious logic. In a 5-4 decision, the four liberal justices – Sonia Sotomayor, Ruth Bader Ginsberg, Stephen Breyer and Elena Kagan – were joined by conservative Neil Gorsuch.
Gorsuch may lean right, but he is also a Westerner who is certainly familiar with the historical record of tribes’ rights being usurped by lower courts. That circumstance likely influenced his decision to uphold tribal rights even though it meant breaking with the ideological right-wing stance of the current high court.
Herrera v. Wyoming, 17-532, was far from simple. The court had to sort out historic rulings on tribal hunting and fishing rights that have gone both for and against Native Americans.

indianz.com
@indianz
 In two years on the nation's highest court, Justice Neil Gorsuch has emerged as a reliable ally for tribal interests despite being picked by a president whose policies and actions have been disastrous for Indian Country. #HonorTheTreaties http://www.indianz.com/News/2019/05/23/supreme-court-winds-down-surprising-term.asp

45
10:30 PM - May 23, 2019
Wow!  Thanks for posting this, Barb.  These stories usually are buried on the back pages. Thanks again.

 

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