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Author Topic: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?  (Read 113959 times)

Yowbarb

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Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #316 on: June 02, 2019, 12:23:24 AM »
Golden Age Women's Southern - 2019 Gathering of Nations Pow Wow

https://youtu.be/BDuhf6ZlGAk

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Published on May 31, 2019

Golden Age Women's Southern
2019 Gathering of Nations Pow Wow
April 26-27, 2019
Albuquerque, New Mexico

Find a Pow Wow near you  https://www.powwows.com/pow-wows-in-my-state-pow-wow-calendar/

ilinda

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #317 on: June 02, 2019, 02:41:07 PM »
U.S. Supreme Court got it right in Crow Tribe hunting case

American history is rife with examples of states and the federal government failing to honor treaties with Native American tribes. The courts have often been party to such egregious injustice.
But not last week. On May 20, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of a Crow tribal member from Montana in his case against Wyoming. The dispute turned on an 1868 treaty that gave the Crow Tribe the right to hunt off their reservation on unoccupied lands.
In 2014, tribal game warden Clayvin Herrera led his family on an Elk hunt. They started their expedition in Montana, where there was no question of their hunting rights. Things got messy though when they pursued their quarry across state lines and killed three elk in the Bighorn National Forest in Wyoming.
Wyoming saw this as an act of poaching and fined Herrera $8,000, placed him on probation for one year and banned him from hunting in the state for three years.
Herrera appealed his conviction but lost in state court and the Wyoming Supreme Court. His lawyers had argued that under the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty, the Crow Tribe was granted “the right to hunt on the unoccupied lands of the United States so long as game may be found thereon, and as long as peace subsists among the whites and Indians on the borders of the hunting districts.”

indianz.com
@indianz
 For Clayvin Herrera and other members of the Apsáalooke Nation, the Supreme Court’s tribal treaty decision vindicates a right they believe essential. #HonorTheTreaties http://www.indianz.com/News/2019/05/21/scotusblog-supreme-court-sides-with-crow.asp


8:48 PM - May 28, 2019

SCOTUSblog: Supreme Court sides with Crow hunter in treaty rights case
For Clayvin Herrera and other members of the Apsáalooke Nation, the Supreme Court’s decision vindicates a right they believe essential.

indianz.com
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But the state of Wyoming maintained that “as long as” doesn’t mean forever, and that the treaty was voided upon Wyoming’s statehood in 1890. And if the court wouldn’t buy that argument, state attorneys had another in their back pocket: The lands became “occupied” when the federal government turned them into a national forest.
“Wyoming statehood was not just a legal event, it was a recognition the once wild frontier was no more,” according to the state’s brief. “And the Crow Tribe understood that its hunting rights had ended.”
The nation’s highest court, however, didn’t swallow that spurious logic. In a 5-4 decision, the four liberal justices – Sonia Sotomayor, Ruth Bader Ginsberg, Stephen Breyer and Elena Kagan – were joined by conservative Neil Gorsuch.
Gorsuch may lean right, but he is also a Westerner who is certainly familiar with the historical record of tribes’ rights being usurped by lower courts. That circumstance likely influenced his decision to uphold tribal rights even though it meant breaking with the ideological right-wing stance of the current high court.
Herrera v. Wyoming, 17-532, was far from simple. The court had to sort out historic rulings on tribal hunting and fishing rights that have gone both for and against Native Americans.

indianz.com
@indianz
 In two years on the nation's highest court, Justice Neil Gorsuch has emerged as a reliable ally for tribal interests despite being picked by a president whose policies and actions have been disastrous for Indian Country. #HonorTheTreaties http://www.indianz.com/News/2019/05/23/supreme-court-winds-down-surprising-term.asp

45
10:30 PM - May 23, 2019
Wow!  Thanks for posting this, Barb.  These stories usually are buried on the back pages. Thanks again.

ilinda

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #318 on: October 14, 2019, 03:36:24 PM »
https://www.yahoo.com/news/tribal-map-america-shows-whose-202100342.html

Tribal Map of America Shows Whose Land You're Actually Living On


David Grossman
,
Popular Mechanics•October 14, 2019

Photo credit: Victor Temprano
From Popular Mechanics
As more and more communities rightfully recognize October 8th as Indigenous People's Day, the question of how best to celebrate indigenous people arises. A good first step is learning about which tribes resided in your specific part of the country before vicious settler colonialism uprooted them or likely worse. Thanks to a mapping company's clever approach to Google Maps, it's possible to learn which native tribes once inhabited your neighborhood.
It's called Native-Land, and it's run by Canadian developer Victor G Temprano. Temprano also runs the company Mapster, which helps to create maps for a wide variety of uses.

Photo credit: Victor G.Temprano
"Native-Land.ca started in early 2015," he says on the site's About page, "during a time of a lot of resource development projects in British Columbia. While mapping out pipeline projects and learning more about them for the sake of public awareness, I started to ask myself whose territories all these projects were happening on. Once I started finding the geographic data and mapping… well, it just kind of expanded from there."
From the Trans Mountain pipeline to Dakota Access, oil pipelines are often flashpoints of technological controversy. With Native-Lands, Temprano was able to use cutting-edge mapping to explore the legacy of a wide variety of borders not often seen in the mainstream.
"I feel that Western maps of Indigenous nations are very often inherently colonial," he says on the site, "in that they delegate power according to imposed borders that don’t really exist in many nations throughout history. They were rarely created in good faith, and are often used in wrong ways."
Native-Lands is very openly not an academic or professional project, one that is constantly changing through input from users. But it's not just a pet project either: in August, Temprano announced that he had hired a research assistant to further develop the site's maps.
H/t Nyasha Junior


Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #319 on: October 14, 2019, 07:11:45 PM »
Really interesting, ilinda!
I am pretty sure there are continual, ongoing legal cases about their land and past and present abuses of Native Americans...

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #320 on: October 14, 2019, 07:20:41 PM »
https://nativenewsonline.net/  Native News Online

NEED TO PROTECT TRIBES UNDER NATIONAL HISTORIC PRESERVATION ACT

BY LADD EDMO / CURRENTS, OPINION / 26 SEP 2019

GUEST COMMENTARY
Published September 26, 2019

As Americans, we have great pride in our National Parks, National Forests, and other public lands and are inspired by their beauty and our experiences on these lands.  To the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of Idaho and tribes across the country, these public lands are much more than that. These lands are our ancestral homelands.

Our ancestral lands include awe-inspiring places such as Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park, Salmon-Challis National Forest, Bridger-Teton National Forest, Boise National Forest, and Sawtooth National Forest.  These lands contain our residences, trails, burial sites, spiritual areas, petroglyphs, healing places, battlegrounds and hunting, fishing and gathering locations.  Even after President Andrew Johnson designated the Fort Hall Reservation by Executive Order in 1867 to force the Shoshone and Bannock people, who moved seasonally to hunting and gathering areas throughout the Great Basin, to one fixed location and after the 1869 U.S. Senate-ratified Second Treaty of Fort Bridger between the United States and Shoshones and Bannocks, which contained provisions that recognize and preserve our close connections to public lands and our reserved off-reservation treaty rights, our deep relationships to our ancestral lands remain strong.   Our people know these lands intimately, and they know where and when subsistence resources are available.

Because our traditional and cultural ways of life are intertwined with these lands, we sound the alarm to all Americans on the National Park Service’s March 1, 2019, proposed rule that would eliminate the ability of tribes to preserve and protect historical and cultural areas on public lands. Without the ability to protect these areas of unique significance, places that are a part of the fabric of this Country’s heritage and history will be harmed or destroyed – it is a matter of when this will happen and not a question of if it will happen.

The National Park Service, through its proposed rule that it cloaked in circular, bureaucratic doublespeak, would essentially assume the role of the U.S. Congress and amend the National Historic Preservation Act to bar tribes (and everyone else) from initiating a nomination or an eligibility determination to list a property on public lands on the National Register of Historic Places (National Register) and alter the law so that only federal agencies could initiate a nomination or eligibility determination to the National Register.  Further, the proposed rule would eliminate the ability of tribes and other parties to appeal a federal agency’s failure to nominate.

The National Park Service issued this proposed rule without government-to-government consultations with tribes in contradiction to Executive Orders and its own policies and is now rushing to finalize this rule as quickly as possible for industry purposes.  To rub salt in the wound, the National Park Service implausibly determined that the proposed rule would have no “substantial direct effect” on tribes and, therefore, no consultation was required prior to issuing the rule.  Only after numerous tribes and organizations spoke out about the lack of consultation and the serious implications for tribes did the Park Service hold one meeting and one phone call in the course of a week. However, by any stretch of the imagination, this does not constitute government-to-government consultations — a cornerstone of the federal trust relationship with tribal governments.

Through the U.S. Constitution, U.S. Supreme Court decisions, numerous treaties, federal laws, and executive orders, the federal government has treaty and trust responsibilities to tribal governments, including the protection of tribal cultural resources.   With the federal government managing approximately 640 million acres of land that was once the sole domain of our ancestors, the various federal agencies tasked with overseeing America’s public lands have obligations to protect and preserve historical and cultural resources and responsibilities to ensure that tribes are included in any decision-making process that could impact our traditional homelands.

The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes ask for your help in engaging the Department of the Interior (DOI) and the National Park Service to make sure it does not stifle the voices of Americans across the country, including the voices of the first Americans, to ensure that we can all fully participate in the process to protect historic places on public lands under the National Historic Preservation Act.

Ladd Edmo is tribal chairman of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes.

R.R. Book

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #321 on: October 15, 2019, 08:03:58 AM »
The map, as expected, put our land at the western boundary of the Lenape, approaching the border with Susquehannock land.

Very interesting Ilinda!

ilinda

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #322 on: October 15, 2019, 11:27:59 AM »
And we are in the Osage area, but there are many of Cherokee descent around here, including a family at the end of our road.   A search shows that although the Osage were the largest tribe in what is now the state of Missouri, that a number of tribes passed through Missouri on the Trail of Tears, a forced migration ordered by President Andrew Jackson.

One of the tribes forced to move was the Cherokee, and that makes one think that many of the locals with Cherokee heritage are probably descended from those who were able to leave the forced march and hide out in these hills, and gradually make a home for themselves.

Amazing what you learn by just looking at a map, as Lenape and Susquehannock are new names to me.  Are there any now living in your area with Native heritage?

R.R. Book

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #323 on: October 15, 2019, 12:59:42 PM »
They would have long ago assimilated if so.  There's a monument to the last known full-blooded tribal member.  The ones who didn't assimilate, move West pre-Jackson, or join another tribe / band ended up in the march to Oklahoma, where they intermarried with the Cherokee, such that it's said that the genealogies can no longer be disentangled.

Another name for the Lenape is the Delaware tribe BTW, which might be more familiar.

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #324 on: November 30, 2019, 02:54:04 PM »
https://www.yahoo.com/news/tribal-map-america-shows-whose-202100342.html

Tribal Map of America Shows Whose Land You're Actually Living On


David Grossman
,
Popular Mechanics•October 14, 2019

Photo credit: Victor Temprano
From Popular Mechanics
As more and more communities rightfully recognize October 8th as Indigenous People's Day, the question of how best to celebrate indigenous people arises. A good first step is learning about which tribes resided in your specific part of the country before vicious settler colonialism uprooted them or likely worse. Thanks to a mapping company's clever approach to Google Maps, it's possible to learn which native tribes once inhabited your neighborhood.
It's called Native-Land, and it's run by Canadian developer Victor G Temprano. Temprano also runs the company Mapster, which helps to create maps for a wide variety of uses.

Photo credit: Victor G.Temprano
"Native-Land.ca started in early 2015," he says on the site's About page, "during a time of a lot of resource development projects in British Columbia. While mapping out pipeline projects and learning more about them for the sake of public awareness, I started to ask myself whose territories all these projects were happening on. Once I started finding the geographic data and mapping… well, it just kind of expanded from there."
From the Trans Mountain pipeline to Dakota Access, oil pipelines are often flashpoints of technological controversy. With Native-Lands, Temprano was able to use cutting-edge mapping to explore the legacy of a wide variety of borders not often seen in the mainstream.
"I feel that Western maps of Indigenous nations are very often inherently colonial," he says on the site, "in that they delegate power according to imposed borders that don’t really exist in many nations throughout history. They were rarely created in good faith, and are often used in wrong ways."
Native-Lands is very openly not an academic or professional project, one that is constantly changing through input from users. But it's not just a pet project either: in August, Temprano announced that he had hired a research assistant to further develop the site's maps.
H/t Nyasha Junior

Thanks, ilinda...
I am living on Seminole Land...

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #325 on: November 30, 2019, 03:00:08 PM »
2019 Leech Lake - Northern Lights Casino - Pow Wow  3:51  49 views
 
https://youtu.be/bCzI0W_66l4

Streamed live 36 minutes ago
...

Stars and Stripes - Flag Song - Cozad - 2016 Gathering of Nations Pow Wow - PowWows.com

https://youtu.be/bCzI0W_66l4



ilinda

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #326 on: December 01, 2019, 05:44:57 PM »
Thanks for posting.  The dancing starts around 4:40 or so and that's the most fun part.

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #327 on: December 07, 2019, 03:16:51 AM »
 :)

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #328 on: December 07, 2019, 03:31:12 AM »
Cloth (2nd group) at the 2019 Iowa Veteran's Dance  4:19   247 views

https://youtu.be/C6JsxFhXlds

Nov 10, 2019
Avis Ballard
1.48K subscribers
This video was recorded on Saturday, November 9th, in Perkins, Oklahoma. 
 

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #329 on: December 07, 2019, 03:44:13 AM »

 

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