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Author Topic: Chickens  (Read 26741 times)

R.R. Book

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Re: Chickens
« Reply #105 on: December 30, 2018, 03:48:26 PM »
For those opting to restrict poultry flight -

Easy painless flight-feather clipping guide (and that full row of feathers can also be clipped a little shorter than that without cutting into the wing bone.  They do grow back):


ilinda

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Re: Chickens
« Reply #106 on: December 31, 2018, 07:52:35 PM »
When I was ordering the guineas, noticed somewhere in the order form that you can include "pinioning" (sp) for $0.65 each, IIRC.  It didn't sound like much, but I decided against it.  I remember how much fun our neighbor's guineas had "screaming and flying" all over the place!

They appeared to be really enjoying life!

R.R. Book

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Re: Chickens
« Reply #107 on: December 31, 2018, 08:16:51 PM »
You can try them unpinioned first, and then change your mind if things get too rowdy! :)

Yowbarb

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Re: Chickens
« Reply #108 on: January 10, 2019, 12:25:31 PM »
I would really love to have chickens. We have the space for them (and more) Yes, I know it's a pain in the rear to have to go out and deal with them in not so nice (freezing) weather. However, I feel it's been so many years since I've actually had chickens that I need to get up to speed before things go sideways... I'd also like to have rabbits, even though I know I'd definitely have issues when it comes to "harvesting" them. I would have to distance myself from those that I know we'd "eat"...  :'( Back in Sweden when I was younger and we'd have a pig and a steer every summer, we'd always exchange them with our closest neighbors, since all of our kids refused to "eat their buddies" but had no problem with eating the neighbors pigs and steers...  :o Would also love to get a few horses again. Been quite a few years since I had my horses. Same with Dan, he put his last old Belgian Horse down about 7 years ago when she was 34 yrs. old. Not sure I'd want a horse quite as big as a Belgian, even though they mostly are very sweet-natured gentle giants. If I'm going to be riding a horse, I'd rather it wasn't quite that far down to the ground...  :o Getting old and breaking easier you know...  ::) LOL My all time favorite and preferred breed of horse has been the Norwegian Fjord Horse. Stubborn to a fault, yes but, very sturdy, sure-footed, weight-bearing, highly intelligent, "designed" for cold/freezing weather temps and an all round horse. Both for riding as well as harnessed and pulling. Also a breed of horse that I've previously owned and know what makes them tick. Dan knows the Belgians but considering that I'd most likely be the one that would have to step up and take care of/train the horses,  8) I think I'd do better, sticking to the ones that I have previous experience with. Question is, where can I find one or 2 of these Norwegian Fjord horses on this side of the pond?? Have found a few that claim that they are Norwegian Fjord horses but, they look nothing like what I call "the real deal"... No way I could afford importing from Scandinavia but will have to widen my search area... Will be needing at least 2 cows/heifers and a few milk goats. Dan has most of the necessary buildings/barns out here, they just haven't been used for quite a few years...
Anywho... this and more will have to wait, as I do need to get my underground buildings/rooms and root cellar completed first... Priorities, priorities, priorities... I hate priorities! I'm an Aries, I want things NOW... LOL

//Solani
Hi Solani, I'm just now reading your post. :)
My computer went awol and as ya know, just been back a couple days.
(Hello fellow Aries.)  ;D
My 75th birthday is April the 7th.
That is awesome you have the rural location. You are not too close to a river bed or bank are you? Best to have the home many feet above the riverplain or riverbank...
I have a ton of ideas many of which I've posted over the years... Ideas are great but I also have so much I need to actually get done.
Yes, such a good idea to get the chickens. My idea would be, have healthy hens and enough roosters to keep it all going. Eat mostly the eggs and an occasional chicken for the pot.
Fertile eggs are such good nutrition.
Wishing ya all the best in your preparations.
- Barb T.

Yowbarb

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Re: Chickens
« Reply #109 on: January 10, 2019, 12:28:39 PM »
For those opting to restrict poultry flight -

Easy painless flight-feather clipping guide (and that full row of feathers can also be clipped a little shorter than that without cutting into the wing bone.  They do grow back):



Good data, thks.

R.R. Book

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Chickens: A good book for winter reading
« Reply #110 on: January 14, 2019, 06:10:42 PM »
Gardening With Chickens by Lisa Steele is full of good ideas and color photos on how to garden in ways that are compatible with poultry, and how to raise poultry in ways that are compatible with gardening.   

Just a few of the topics included:

*Plants to grow for deep orange egg yolks (far more nutritious than pale yellow yolks)

*Ducks in the garden

*Constructing barriers

*Gardening for poultry immune system and respiratory health

« Last Edit: January 20, 2019, 07:31:53 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Chickens
« Reply #111 on: January 16, 2019, 05:56:07 PM »
The guineas I ordered won't be here until May, so there's time to learn about them.  For example, they apparently eat less greenery than chickens, or do they?
Does anyone know what to feed the babies for the first few weeks, while they're in their little box with the heat lamp above? 

R.R. Book

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Re: Chickens
« Reply #112 on: January 17, 2019, 06:07:48 AM »
All poultry in confinement are "obligate vegetarians," meaning that they'd prefer to chase live protein than eat mashed grains.

This cooperative extension excerpt says that guinea chicks need a quarter protein in their diet, to be reduced down to a normal hen ration after 8 weeks:

Quote
Guineas need a higher protein feed than chickens, but do quite well on regular poultry diets. Keets need a 24% to 26% protein ration as the starter feed. The protein level should be reduced to 18% to 20% for the fifth to eighth weeks. After eight weeks, the keets can be fed a 16% layer mash.

https://articles.extension.org/pages/67816/raising-guinea-fowl

We make a home-made mash that is 1/3 black oil sunflower seeds, 1/3 oats, and 1/3 miscellaneous greens or leftovers.  Then besides grazing outside the pen, they also have access to a compost heap inside the pen with things such as mushy pumpkins, celery leaves, rotting apples from adjacent trees, their own crushed egg shells, garden clippings, etc.

I strongly recommend that poultry owners who are interested in prepping give consideration to bulk storage of oats so there's always a basic component of the mash on hand that contains its own vitamin E content and keeps long-term.  Very good to have on hand in weather that doesn't permit grazing, at the very least.  Most commercially produced mash contains GMO corn, which we don't allow here.

« Last Edit: January 17, 2019, 05:00:18 PM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: Chickens
« Reply #113 on: January 17, 2019, 06:16:52 AM »
I had no idea how many colors guinea fowl come in:



http://www.breezybirdfarms.com/guinea-fowl.php

ilinda

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Re: Chickens
« Reply #114 on: January 17, 2019, 02:17:23 PM »
Thank you so much for (# 112) the guinea information.  I had been looking and wasn't getting a lot.  This is the best starter I need.  One friend last year said, when I was contemplating chickens, to make sure even when they're still quite small, to give them a little stinging nettle greens every day, presumably for the minerals.  I'm going to see if the guineas will accept it also, as they are similar, and that stinging nettle patch is finally growing, and maybe a bit more than I had anticipated.

And, yes, there are many types/colors of guineas.  I ordered mine from a place in Iowa, "guineafarm.com" is their website, and they do have a lot of variety.  The owners/,managers are the second generation, and they have had experience raising the birds as children on the farm.

R.R. Book

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Re: Chickens
« Reply #115 on: January 17, 2019, 04:44:54 PM »
Quote
they have had experience raising the birds as children on the farm.

Such a great experience for children  :)

Nettle tea seems like a good idea.  If it disagrees with them, they can simply pass it up and no harm done.  Reading your post reminded me that comfrey is also a biodynamic accumulator, and would be full of minerals too.

« Last Edit: January 17, 2019, 05:24:45 PM by R.R. Book »

 

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