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Author Topic: Food and Storage: Eggs and other food production  (Read 1750 times)

Yowbarb

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Food and Storage: Eggs and other food production
« on: January 30, 2011, 08:31:45 AM »
Storey's Guide to Raising Chickens: 3rd Edition (Storey's Guide to Raising Series)

ISBN-10: 1603424709

Amazon Prime


http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1603424709?ie=UTF8&tag=survivalcom-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1603424709


Solani

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Re: Food and Storage: Eggs and other food production
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2019, 08:17:51 PM »
Long storage of raw eggs in Water-glass (Sodium Silicate)
Here in Canada, we can buy Water-glass by the gallon in old time hardware stores. I have also seen that you can buy from online stores both here in Canada as well as in the US. Other countries, I don't know, so those of you that live in other countries will need to Google it as well as what it is called in your language. The technical name for it is Sodium Silicate. The one we buy, says on it that it is "food grade". I however have no idea what you would use it in when cooking. Most common use for it that I've heard of, is that it is used as a sealant for cement floors etc. Which makes sense, since you do want to seal the egg from both air and everything else.

This is a method of storing eggs that was common before refrigeration, especially when storing eggs over winter when most chickens have stopped laying eggs.

We have tried this method with more success than I had thought we'd have...  :o ;D

I use large gallon glass pickle jars but, you can use a bucket with a tight lid or basically any kind of deep crock, jar or whatever you have that has a lid that keeps it airtight.

I prefer the gallon pickle jar because it's deep and wide, as well as has a wide "mouth" which I can easily fit my hand into, both when placing the eggs in the water-glass/water mixture and when I need get out an egg for whatever I am cooking. I also like it since I can see through the clear glass and see if something is going wrong with the eggs.

We've been told that this works best, if not only with non fertilized (farm) eggs. We'll order a couple of dozen eggs from one of our neighbors out here. The eggs need to be "natural" as in not washed. You can brush off loose dirt or poop but not to the point where you'd have to scrape it off the egg. The thin film that is on the egg when it's been laid, needs to be intact. If you wash the eggs or brush them off to hard, you will damage the thin layer of protective "film". That's one reason why store bought eggs won't work, they've been washed...

If you have your own laying hens, you can also prefill the water-glass/distilled water mixture in your jar and add eggs on a daily basis in your jar/crock, until your jar has enough eggs in it so that there is about 2 inches of water-glass mixture above the top eggs. Be careful when you place the eggs in the jar so they don't crack. I recommend using clean dry rubber gloves, or just your clean hands. I however hate the feeling of the water-glass since it's slimy...  :D This is also something you need to think about when you reach in to take eggs out, it's slimy and the eggs can easily slip from your fingers. When I take however many eggs I need for cooking out of the jar, I rinse them well under cold water, until I can feel that all the "slime" water-glass mixture is gone. Not that it is poisonous, I just feel that I want it off since it's gross... I also dry the eggs after I've rinsed them off.

Here is how you make the water-glass mixture.

You will need one part Water-glass (Sodium Silicate) and 9 parts room temperature distilled water. Mix thoroughly.

If you have all the eggs you need to fill your jar, just start placing them carefully into the jar which you have filled at least half full with the water-glass mixture. My gallon pickle jar will fit about 18 eggs. If you are placing the fresh eggs in daily when your hens have laid them, just keep adding eggs daily, until your jar is full and the top eggs are covered with about 2 inches of the water-glass mixture. Screw the lid on and place the jar in a fairly dark and cool place. I store ours in our kitchen, on the floor between the fridge and the outer wall. We have cold floors and walls. So, during the winter the temperature on the floor next to our fridge usually is about 60F. I've just put a large towel over the jars to keep most light out, even if it is relatively dark there regardless...

First year I was here in Canada with Dan, he was already experimenting with this method and had placed the fresh raw eggs in water-glass. He'd take 1 egg out of the jar every month, crack it, smell it, look at it and then fry it... I'll be honest and admit that I thought he was stark raving crazy and refused to even smell an egg that had been sitting in a jar with only god knows what in it on the floor for months on end but... after seeing him eat it, I started to understand that this was probably something that actually worked. So, next egg, I agreed to smell and the one after that (the month after) I actually tasted...  :o Looked like an egg, smelled like an egg and tasted like an egg... Only thing I noticed was after about 6 months, the yolks would break when I'd crack them into a bowl before putting them in the frying pan. Other than that, they "behaved" like any egg that's OK should. I also made cupcakes with eggs we had stored for 6 months in the water-glass. No problem.

That was our first try with storing eggs in water-glass. We used the last eggs about 8 months after he'd initially put them in the water-glass jar. Out of the 18 eggs that fit in the pickle jar, I only threw one of the eggs away because I didn't quite like the smell of it. That was about 4 months into the "science project".

Next try was the year after. We filled 2 gallon pickle jars with eggs and water-glass. Put them on the floor next to the fridge and forgot about them... We knew that they would last for at least 6 to 8 months, so we had planned on starting to test them when they'd been stored for 6 months. We'd read that you could store them this way for up to 9 months but had to be very careful when cracking them after about 6 - 7 months.

Like I wrote, we forgot about them... So, they sat there for  about 11 months... Oooops...  8) I'll admit, I was NOT looking forward to opening up that first egg... and held it at arms length. But, it looked like and egg and smelled like an egg, even if the yolk did break when I cracked the shell. I poured that first egg into a larger bowl and cracked the next one into a Pyrex measuring cup and when I'd decided that it was OK, I poured it into the larger bowl with the first egg and kept on doing that with the rest of the eggs. Out of the 18 eggs stored in the first jar. I lost only 4 eggs. One egg had cracked and I could see that the crack was dark so, I didn't even try to open it... 1 of the eggs floated up to the top when I lifted the egg above it out of the jar so, that one got thrown out too. If eggs float, you throw them away... 2 eggs were rotten...  :o But, there was nothing on the outside of the egg that gave a hint that something was wrong with the inside of the egg. Guessing the protective film on the shell had been damaged somehow but, they didn't harm the other eggs in the jar at all. Second jar, I had to throw away 3 eggs that had gone bad. Pretty good for being stored in a jar with slimy liquid (water-glass LOL) for about 1 year... :D

However, I do NOT recommend storing them for this long but, it was actually fun to see that it worked. I'd say that for best/safest results, don't go past 6 - 7 months...

I had decided that I was going to dehydrate the raw eggs so, I scrambled them first and then put the scrambled eggs into my dehydrator. I know now, that if you are going to dehydrate eggs that you want to be able to use when baking, you need to dehydrate them "raw". Just mix them thoroughly so that everything is the same color and pour the raw egg mixture into the trays in your dehydrator that are made for dehydrating liquids.

You can dehydrate the scrambled eggs too but, if you try to bake with them, your cupcakes etc. won't rise and the texture is kind of grainy. Still eatable but... You can however successfully reconstitute the dried scrambled egg powder with a little milk or water, let sit until the fluid has been absorbed and scramble the eggs in your frying pan again. Not quite the same as fresh scrambled eggs but, eatable... Spices, chives etc. can make anything taste good...  :P You still have the nutrition from the eggs.

If you are going to bake with the dried raw egg powder, I do recommend that you put a table spoon of egg powder (equals one egg) in a cup and add about 2 table spoons milk or water stir and let sit until it's no longer "grainy", then add to your recipe as you would any fresh egg.

Both methods of dehydrating scrambled as well as raw "egg batter" you need to make into a powder once they're dry. I use my large electric coffee/spice grinder and then store the finished dry egg powder in sealed Mylar bags with an oxygen-absorber. You can also vacuum seal the powder in mason jars or, place an oxygen-absorber with the powder in the mason jar but, they will last longer if they are stored where the light can't get to them.

//Solani


Disclaimer... I don't take responsibility for anyone's usage of this method, as I am not there to supervise how it is being done, how the eggs are being stored and everything involved in the process. I can only take responsibility for what I do. This is merely a method that was used during the "olden days" to preserve eggs, which I have personally found to work. In other words... Do it at your own risk. (I hate disclaimers but... ) 

« Last Edit: February 07, 2019, 11:36:53 AM by Solani »
~In order to determine what is possible, one only needs to step out into what is considered impossible and look around...~
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R.R. Book

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Re: Food and Storage: Eggs and other food production
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2019, 05:50:05 AM »
Solani, Thank you so much for this detailed post. 

Waterglass would be a great thing to help even out the egg laying year, if you know what I mean...more eggs in summer than you know what to do with, and then a dearth of eggs around Winter Solstice just when you're doing your holiday baking.

Regarding the need to avoid cleaning the eggs too much first, it might help to put clean bedding in the nest boxes the night before the Waterglass project, and then the next morning's eggs hopefully would be clean.

Here's a link where those who live in the States can purchase it:
https://www.lehmans.com/product/water-glass-liquid-sodium-silicate/


Solani

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Re: Food and Storage: Eggs and other food production
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2019, 11:35:47 AM »
Great tip about clean bedding in the hens "bedroom".  :-*
Also, thank you for finding the link for buying the Sodium Silicate in the US!

Yes, it is a very good way of storing fresh eggs, not only in preparation for when the hens stop laying during the winter but as you write, also during the time when the hens are laying "to many" and being able to store the surplus for when they are needed. Even if we have refrigeration now, the eggs will not last for many weeks/months. Dehydrating them is also a good way to store the eggs for future use.

This is one method that I can fully stand behind and honestly say, if you follow the directions, fresh newly laid eggs, non fertilized and not washed, so that the protective film which surrounds the egg isn't damaged. Eggs added in a large airtight jar or container with 1 part Water-glass (Sodium Silicate) to 9 parts room temperature distilled water.

However, going as long as we did with the batches we had "forgotten about" and safely using them after nearly a whole year, I agree that, that is pushing the limit and one should only store them for the recommended 6 - 7 months, or have them used up by the time we know that the hens will be laying new eggs again.
//Solani

Disclaimer... I don't take responsibility for anyone's usage of this method, as I am not there to supervise how it is being done, how the eggs are being stored and everything involved in the process. I can only take responsibility for what I do. This is merely a method that was used during the "olden days" to preserve eggs, which I have personally found to work. In other words... Do it at your own risk. (I hate disclaimers but... ) 
~In order to determine what is possible, one only needs to step out into what is considered impossible and look around...~
*******************************
~I am no longer accepting the things I cannot change... I am changing the things I cannot accept~
*******************************

Yowbarb

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Re: Food and Storage: Eggs and other food production
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2019, 01:01:53 PM »
Wow, Solani and also R.R. great info.
:)

Solani

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Re: Food and Storage: Eggs and other food production
« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2019, 05:48:43 PM »
Thank you!  ;D :-*
~In order to determine what is possible, one only needs to step out into what is considered impossible and look around...~
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~I am no longer accepting the things I cannot change... I am changing the things I cannot accept~
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ilinda

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Re: Food and Storage: Eggs and other food production
« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2019, 06:35:38 PM »
Agreed, this is a great topic.  It may have been mentioned once or twice before, but some of us needed that reminder, complete with picture and link, to the sodium silicate/WaterGlass.
Thanks for posting and the discussion.

 

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