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Author Topic: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap  (Read 30792 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #45 on: August 07, 2012, 11:01:03 AM »
Excellent find Barb, Thanks!!  I am placing my order this week, looks like the best deal around!  (Steedy, I hadn't seen the commercial again either...)

Well it supposedly would last well over a year if left on continuously...
I did the arithmetic on that. That would definitely help.  :)

Yowbarb

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #46 on: September 02, 2012, 03:02:17 AM »
Miscellaneous bottle and can images:

Old photo, Green bottle glass house
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2252/1706654911_3d54725f17_o.jpg

from site,
http://weburbanist.com/2007/10/23/5-kinds-of-creative-recycled-architecture-cans-bottles-and-other-unusual-building-materials/

Beautiful interior, Glass bottle church:
http://www.centralplainsmanitoba.ca/photos/glass_bottle_church_L.jpg

http://www.boxvox.net/2009/02/glass-bottle-houses.html  8 bottle houses
================================


ftp://Tin Can Top Wall by Clare Graham:
http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/uimages/sf/5-28-tin%20can.jpg
sorry if this is slightly off the track will post this all over in survival websites too,

Designer Covers Mountain House with Recycled Tin Cans in Patagonia
by Paula Alvarado, Buenos Aires:

http://www.treehugger.com/files/2009/03/designer-covers-mountain-house-with-recycled-tin-cans-patagonia.php

http://www.archkidecture.org/structures/img_tin_restuarant.jpg

PHOTO below, the Doc Hope House.

Excerpted from Debra Jane Seltzer’s Agility Nut website:

In 1941, Friel Dalton built this bottle house in Hillsville, VA for John Hope, a pharmacist nicknamed “Doc”. It was built as a playhouse for Hope’s daughter. It took about three months to build with Friel working 8-10 hours per day. The bottles came from all over including medicine bottles from Hope’s store and wine bottles from a local restaurant
Unlike other bottle houses, the bottles point outward so that the inner walls are flush. Green bottles form an “H” pattern (for Hope) on one of the side walls. There is also a blue bottle chandelier.


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« Last Edit: September 02, 2012, 07:12:33 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #47 on: September 02, 2012, 08:59:50 AM »
http://www.rootsimple.com/2011/12/michael-reynolds-beer-can-houses.html


"The National Archive just put thousands of 1970s era images from the Environmental Protection Agency online. One of the photographers working for the EPA, David Hiser, captured New Mexico architect Michael Reynolds building houses out of adobe and aluminum cans. See a selection of these photos . .

http://www.flickr.com/photos/usnationalarchives/collections/72157620729903309/

Caption: "Detail of a wall in an experimental home built of aluminum beer and soft drink cans near Taos, New Mexico. for this wall the cans were laid horizontally in two thicknesses which are separated by a vertical sheet of foam insulation. The exterior will be a combination of glass, exposed can ends and unpainted concrete. Unskilled labor and the cheapness of materials will allow the structure to be built as much as 20% less than conventional housing."

" empty steel beer and soft drink can construction near Taos, New Mexico. This house will be plastered with adobe like the other homes in the area, but will have cost up to 20% less, according to architect Michael Reynolds"
« Last Edit: September 02, 2012, 09:33:25 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #48 on: September 05, 2013, 09:31:56 AM »
Note: I would move this Topic to the board, Surviving in place, but that move function no longer works.
Here is another idea for "Aftertimes" building.
- Yowbarb
...
SHTF & Prepping Central

Lots Of FREE Straw Bale House Plans

 See here >> http://www.shtfpreparedness.com/lots-free-straw-bale-house-plans/

Lots Of FREE Straw Bale House Plans See here >> http://www.shtfpreparedness.com/lots-free-straw-bale-house-plans/

Yowbarb

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« Last Edit: September 22, 2013, 12:48:35 PM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #50 on: October 11, 2013, 06:36:21 AM »
A word of caution.
In the past, I have posted advice that people start saving scraps of material on the survival land.
This is for future use in building.
I have looked at a lot of land ads in Ebay. Even in the ones which say there is a lack of rules, regulations,
there is often a phrase no dumping, no buildup of "trash." One man's future building materials is another man's "trash."
It will be important to create a place to store materials such as a shed or an underground pit.
Here is a recap of stuff which could be hauled up there and also stuff salvaged from projects on the land.
I am thinking whenever people drive up to their land, they can bring their recycling: Aluminum cans plastic bottles glass bottles newspapers
and while projects are going on, there will be some scraps such as, wood scraps, cardboard boxes and packing materials.
•   Wood scrap
•   Aluminum cans
•   Glass bottles
•   Newspapers
•   Packing materials
•   Cardboard boxes

Some items to stock up on, and get stored on the land, in a place where it won't get lost:
•   tools
•   glue
•   duct tape
•   nails
•   chicken wire fencing



http://trashbackwards.files.wordpress.com/2012/08/chicks-in-sticks-photo-c2a9-liesl-clark.jpg

Yowbarb

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #52 on: June 05, 2017, 11:36:35 AM »
Yowbarb Note: RE keeping supplies on your survival land, for later use.

Even in the remote, off the grid properties I have seen, when you look at the details there are often rules about 'dumping" "lots of stuff" etc.
Also: I think it would be a good idea to dig a big hole and set in a reinforced concrete area where you can accumulate some stuff... boards, cans, cloth, sticks, adobe type materials etc.

In a pinch a deep hole and stuff dropped in , in plastic bags would have to do. cover the hole with a big plywood and totally weigh it down and cover with brush, pine needles etc.

The idea is to keep things out of sight but do accumulate materials for later use.

One man's "junk" is another man's raw material for sheds, quick emergency shelters, barns, makeshift fencing. People will need to store cement etc. People have built homes with cement and bottles, cans so keep those too, if possible.

Rules: Often icky picky rules on mobile homes etc. they need a skirt etc. be sure you get a property where you can put any kind of vehicle you want without limitation and live in whatever the heck you want as you build more permanent structures.

Yowbarb

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #53 on: December 21, 2017, 11:56:57 AM »
I meant where would you get concrete, like how do you make it?  I think it's a mixture of small pebbles and sand, but I don't know.  I was thinking of even if you had a few bags stored up, where could you get more if you needed more?

I like the picture of the guy building with aluminum cans.  I have a few hundred cans myself.  I was thinking of recycling them, but maybe I should save them for building material!
steedy, not sure I really ever replied to your question. "where could you get more if you needed more?"
Answer:
The only thing I can say is, if the __hits the fan then whatever a survival group has stored up will have to do, for a long, long time.
It is always (possible) to trade goods, find goods and supplies. Something like cement will be at a premium, because people will still be building or need to build again, in the Aftertimes.
People need to store what they can. Some rules for storing:
...

Things to remember:
Keep cement protected from dampness and moisture. ...
Do not place cement bags directly on concrete or wood floors. ...
Handle cement bags carefully. ...
Keep cement bags protected during transportation. ...
Store cement bags separately. ...
Provide adequate ventilation when stored in pallets in warehouses.
More items...
Storage and Handling of Cement and Aggregates - The Screed Scientist
www.screedscientist.com/floor.../storage-and-handling-of-cement-and-aggregates/

...
Randomly selected sites and images: Anyone who knows of excellent products or sites PLS post here.
Concrete is made up of three basic components: water, aggregate (rock, sand, or gravel) and Portland cement. Cement, usually in powder form, acts as a binding agent when mixed with water and aggregates.

Concrete Information, Definition - The Concrete Network
https://www.concretenetwork.com/concrete.html
...

http://aimixconcretemixer.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/hand-operated-CM2A-350.jpg


buy concrete: http://onthehouse.com/buying-concrete-12-tips-determing-project-success/

Yowbarb

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #54 on: December 21, 2017, 12:00:34 PM »
How long can you keep cement for?
If the container in which the cement has been stored is airtight and has been stored in an environment where the temperature and humidity have been carefully controlled, (eg air-conditioned or dehumidified room), then the cement may remain fully reactive for up to 12 months, as long as the container has not been opened ...Oct 18, 2011
...

Depends on how exactly you store it. If you want to keep it around as long as possible without becoming a brick, put it in a seal-able plastic tub with desiccant packs and keep it in your house

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #55 on: December 21, 2017, 12:05:51 PM »
Re-posting this, from a few months ago:
...

Yowbarb Note: RE keeping supplies on your survival land, for later use.

Even in the remote, off the grid properties I have seen, when you look at the details there are often rules about "dumping" "lots of stuff" etc.
Also: I think it would be a good idea to dig a big hole and set in a reinforced concrete area where you can accumulate some stuff... boards, cans, cloth, sticks, adobe type materials etc.

In a pinch a deep hole and stuff dropped in , in plastic bags would have to do. cover the hole with a big plywood and totally weigh it down and cover with brush, pine needles etc.

The idea is to keep things out of sight but do accumulate materials for later use.

One man's "junk" is another man's raw material for sheds, quick emergency shelters, barns, makeshift fencing. People will need to store cement etc. People have built homes with cement and bottles, cans so keep those too, if possible.

Rules: Often icky picky rules on mobile homes etc. they need a skirt etc.  Be sure you get a property where you can put any kind of vehicle you want without limitation and live in whatever the heck you want as you build more permanent structures.

If that sort of freedom is not possible regarding the  storing of "junk" then be crafty, fence things off or set in trees so passersby cannot see your projects. Bury supplies. By that I mean supplies which will not deteriorate much by being buried. You could dump it in a hold and cover then later  create a cement underground storage area or 2 or 10, for many supplies...

Regarding the cement it does need a waterproof sealed tub with dessicants in a shed or shelter and set it up off the ground... Not likely to keep more than a yrs, max.

ilinda

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #56 on: December 22, 2017, 03:42:24 PM »
Re-posting this, from a few months ago:
...

Yowbarb Note: RE keeping supplies on your survival land, for later use.

Even in the remote, off the grid properties I have seen, when you look at the details there are often rules about "dumping" "lots of stuff" etc.
Also: I think it would be a good idea to dig a big hole and set in a reinforced concrete area where you can accumulate some stuff... boards, cans, cloth, sticks, adobe type materials etc.

In a pinch a deep hole and stuff dropped in , in plastic bags would have to do. cover the hole with a big plywood and totally weigh it down and cover with brush, pine needles etc.

The idea is to keep things out of sight but do accumulate materials for later use.

One man's "junk" is another man's raw material for sheds, quick emergency shelters, barns, makeshift fencing. People will need to store cement etc. People have built homes with cement and bottles, cans so keep those too, if possible.

Rules: Often icky picky rules on mobile homes etc. they need a skirt etc.  Be sure you get a property where you can put any kind of vehicle you want without limitation and live in whatever the heck you want as you build more permanent structures.

If that sort of freedom is not possible regarding the  storing of "junk" then be crafty, fence things off or set in trees so passersby cannot see your projects. Bury supplies. By that I mean supplies which will not deteriorate much by being buried. You could dump it in a hold and cover then later  create a cement underground storage area or 2 or 10, for many supplies...

Regarding the cement it does need a waterproof sealed tub with dessicants in a shed or shelter and set it up off the ground... Not likely to keep more than a yrs, max.
Cement is the weak link in building with concrete, IMHO.  But in a survival situation, there are mixes you can concoct from what is hopefully lying around.  For example, what if you need to build a stone wall out of flat rocks and your cement bags have absorbed moisture and now the contents are hardened blocks of useless stuff?

You can mix clay, ashes, cinders, sand, possibly some sawdust, and water.  The clay, cinders/ashes, and sand are a good starting point and one can experiment with the right amount of water to add.  This gloppy mix can serve as mortar in one of two situations:  1) where the flat rocks will by mortared on top of other flat rocks, so that rains will not beat against them, but may only hit the edges; and 2) in very dry climates such as the desert southwest, where rain is so low as to not affect the mortar.

The key is protecting the mortar or mortared surfaces from driving rains.

The beauty of this method is avoiding dragging hundreds or thousands of pounds of bags of cement around.  In addition, you only mix what you need, and don't have to leave a partially used bag for the next mix, and hope it remains dry.

Yowbarb

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #57 on: February 14, 2018, 07:23:37 PM »
ilinda you are onto somethign here... We need to find out more about what natural cements could be used... Thanks for what you posted...

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Re: Aftertime cement
« Reply #58 on: June 04, 2018, 06:19:25 AM »
ilinda you are onto somethign here... We need to find out more about what natural cements could be used... Thanks for what you posted...
Please visit CEMENT on my message board. Hempcrete is often assumed to be about hemp colloides when in fact it is about chemistry... 2 kinds of things called "hempcrete":
- a kind of plaster with hemp used instead of straw or hay
- a concrete substitute that's lighter but stronger than concrete, using hemp hurd combined with lye
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Re: straw: slip straw
« Reply #59 on: June 04, 2018, 06:28:07 AM »
SLIP STRAW, EARTHEN FLOORS, AND TADELAKT: A RECIPE FOR A PERFECTLY NATURAL HOME
The straw you use should be from some sort of grain such as rice, wheat, barley, etc. Hay, which comes from different types of grasses, isn’t suitable since it is usually much thinner than the thicker stalks of grain-based straw.
(I have to say i don't understand this statement since rice is a kind of grass.)

The first step in slip straw construction is to build a timber frame for your home. Since slip straw walls are so light weight, they are only usable for infill walls and can´t bear the weight of a roof. Once your timber frame is finished, you need to set up a form (plywood works great) that is around 4 to 6 inches thick.

mix up a heavy clay slurry by mixing 1 part clay (high clay content is best) to 2 parts water.
Take your straw and dip it into the clay slurry making sure that all the individual fibers get coated. Then, put the clay soaked straw (this is the slip straw) into your wall form and use a stick to compact it as tightly as you can. Continue adding more slip straw and compacting until your wall is completely “filled up.” Let your slip straw dry for several days before removing the form.

One of the most beautiful types of natural plasters is “tadelakt”, an ancient Moroccan form of lime based plaster. Tadelakt can be used as a plaster over earthen homes, straw bales homes, or earthbag homes. To build with tadelakt, you need to first make a lime based plaster by mixing 2 parts lime putty (lime powder mixed with water to the consistency of a thick milk shake and let to sit and mature for several weeks) with 1 part very find sand material. Marble dust (used in Venetian plasters) is a great option, adds strength to the plaster, and can be found at most pool supply stores.
The trick to tadelakt plasters is in the process of polishing. It is a very time consuming process as you can only do a small section of each wall at a time. Place a little bit of the lime based plaster on your wall and smooth it so that is flat. Once the plaster starts to set, take a small polished rock with a smooth side and begin to polish your wall repeatedly. The goal is to try and force out of all the water in your lime based plaster. You will need to polish a small section of wall for 15 to 30 minutes with your smooth rock until the plaster is smooth and dry.
Once you´ve finished plastering your wall, you can seal the wall with a natural soap such as olive oil soap and you will have a bright, smooth plaster that will make you feel as if you´re living in a polished piece of pottery. When done correctly, tadelakt plasters are waterproof and can even be used for earthen sinks or bathtubs.

To build an earthen floor, follow the simple constructions below:

Fill the perimeter foundation of the living space with 1-inch washed and cleaned gravel. Be sure not to use surfacing gravel, which is commonly used on roads.
Pour a 1-inch-thick layer of sand over the gravel.
Cover the sand with a layer of the 30-ml plastic sheets.
Pour another 1-inch-thick layer of sand over the plastic. The sand on both the bottom and the top will protect the plastic sheeting from being torn by the gravel.
Pour about 2 inches of road base on top of the sand. Spray it lightly with water, tamping down the road base by hand until it is tightly compacted. Add the road base in this manner until you have about a 5-inch layer of road base.
Mix together six parts sifted sand, two parts sifted clay and one part finely cut straw in a wheelbarrow. The amounts of each material vary depending on the size of the room.
Spread a 2-3 inch thick layer of the adobe onto the floor. Let dry for at least a week. It will crack.
Once dried, lay another 1 inch thick layer of adobe onto the floor using the trowel to create a smooth finish leaving it to dry for another week. It should crack significantly less.
The final layer should be no more than half an inch thick and applied with a trowel to give a fine finish. Let dry completely.
Once dried, apply linseed oil to the entire floor with a rag. Make sure to put down as much oil as possible without creating puddles. Let dry, which can take a couple of days.
Mix three parts linseed oil with one part oil thinner, and apply the mixture to the entire floor. Let dry completely.
Mix two parts linseed oil with two parts oil thinner, and apply the mixture over the second layer. Let dry completely.
Mix one part linseed oil with three parts oil thinner and apply the mixture over the third coat. Let dry completely. It is important to make sure that between coats, the oil is completely absorbed into the floor.
To seal the floor, one can add melted beeswax as well.
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