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Author Topic: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap  (Read 48908 times)

R.R. Book

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #60 on: June 04, 2018, 06:52:23 AM »
That sounds like it would be a very rewarding project to try - almost fun, in fact!

ilinda

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #61 on: June 05, 2018, 05:43:47 PM »
We should all be experimenting now with various mixes for mortars and "cements", as humid areas with high rainfall will require different types of construction than dry areas with rare rain (not as common now, in view of the flash flooding everywhere, including "1,000-year floods").

A few years ago I was mixing wood ash from the wood stove with water and something else I cannot now recall, but it immediately brought to mind a distinction Dad made years ago, but which I never followed up on.

Dad would talk about getting more concrete blocks at times, and at other times, he would mention cinder blocks.  I remember the cinder blocks looked different and smelled different when wet.  And, years later on that day I had mixed wood ash with water and the other ingredient, I immediately remembered the cinder blocks, because the mix I was working with smelled remarkably similar to those cinder blocks.  It was an AHA moment, because I suddenly realized why they were referring to them as "cinder" blocks--they were made from cinders, or the burnt slag from some kind of fire, that is probably not wood, although am guessing wood ashes and cinders could also be used.

Here's what I'm getting at:  in a situation where you can't run to the nearest hardward store or big box outlet for supplies, how could/would you be able to concoct some type of mortar from materials found around the homestead, in the woods, or the landfill, or wherever?  I plan to experiment again with cinders or ash, sand, clay, sawdust or wheat straw/grass fiber, etc., and water.  Maybe there's something I'm forgetting, and if so, it will probably be remembered when the mix does not hold together!

It's definitely time to experiment.


Yowbarb

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Re: Aftertime cement
« Reply #62 on: June 29, 2018, 10:16:24 PM »
ilinda you are onto somethign here... We need to find out more about what natural cements could be used... Thanks for what you posted...
Please visit CEMENT on my message board. Hempcrete is often assumed to be about hemp colloides when in fact it is about chemistry... 2 kinds of things called "hempcrete":
- a kind of plaster with hemp used instead of straw or hay
- a concrete substitute that's lighter but stronger than concrete, using hemp hurd combined with lye

Socrates, thanks, good ideas...

Yowbarb

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #63 on: June 29, 2018, 10:32:40 PM »
The Power of Hemp and its countless uses  9:28   163,481 views

https://youtu.be/vZvFE53JzDk

...

HempCrete Strongest & Greenest Building material in Nature
14:55     703,274 views

https://youtu.be/naGAnhax-tI

Yowbarb

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #64 on: June 29, 2018, 10:39:30 PM »
Can You Build a House With Hemp? | National Geographic  3:22 118,644 views

https://youtu.be/g4kKxY7KNyw

Published on Sep 16, 2015
Growing industrial hemp was illegal in the United States after 1970 because the industrial plant and marijuana were considered to be the same, when in fact they are different varieties of Cannabis. In recent years, some states have changed their laws, allowing farmers to start growing industrial hemp, which is used in everything from clothing to nutritional products to building materials. Oregon grower Cliff Thomason says growing and processing hemp was stymied because it was illegal, but now a knowledge base for best uses can grow, along with the plants. View a hemp home constructed using hempcrete, a building material that advocates claim is mold resistant, breathable, and eco-friendly.
➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe
« Last Edit: June 29, 2018, 10:51:38 PM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #65 on: June 29, 2018, 10:43:52 PM »
https://ministryofhemp.com/hemp/not-marijuana/

Are Hemp and Marijuana the Same?
Deconstructing the biggest controversy of hemp that caused it to be banned for 80 years

Short Answer: No, they are just both part of the Cannabis family

Hemp is completely different from marijuana in its function, cultivation and application. But these differences didn’t stop our political leaders from getting confused and accidentally grouping all Cannabis species as a Schedule I Drug and banning it in 1970 under the Controlled Substances Act. Even after 45 years, the government still seems to have some confusion in distinguishing the two plants. Although legislation is being made, progress has been slow.In its application, hemp and marijuana serve completely different purposes. Marijuana, as it is widely known, is used for medicinal or recreational purposes. Hemp is used in variety of other applications that marijuana couldn’t possibly be used in. These include healthy dietary supplements, skin products, clothing, and accessories. Overall, hemp is known to have over 25,000 possible applications. https://ministryofhemp.com/hemp/

ilinda

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #66 on: June 30, 2018, 08:00:46 PM »
https://ministryofhemp.com/hemp/not-marijuana/

Are Hemp and Marijuana the Same?
Deconstructing the biggest controversy of hemp that caused it to be banned for 80 years

Short Answer: No, they are just both part of the Cannabis family

Hemp is completely different from marijuana in its function, cultivation and application. But these differences didn’t stop our political leaders from getting confused and accidentally grouping all Cannabis species as a Schedule I Drug and banning it in 1970 under the Controlled Substances Act. Even after 45 years, the government still seems to have some confusion in distinguishing the two plants. Although legislation is being made, progress has been slow.In its application, hemp and marijuana serve completely different purposes. Marijuana, as it is widely known, is used for medicinal or recreational purposes. Hemp is used in variety of other applications that marijuana couldn’t possibly be used in. These include healthy dietary supplements, skin products, clothing, and accessories. Overall, hemp is known to have over 25,000 possible applications. https://ministryofhemp.com/hemp/
Using hemp for construction makes total sense.  It's so quickly renewable compared to trees, which take many years to regrow, assuming they are not GM trees that require extraordinary amounts of water, and pollute the environment with alien, mutant genes.

Hemp is an annual with huge potential.  It's about time the truth becomes known.  Dolores Cannon, well known regression hypnotist, who had hypnotized thousands and thousands of people, had said more than once that the real reason marijuana was made illegal is not because people can use it to get high, but because it has so many uses in healing, and people do not need doctors or Big Pharma, if they know how to use it properly in healing.

Yowbarb

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #67 on: June 09, 2019, 06:31:47 PM »
We should all be experimenting now with various mixes for mortars and "cements", as humid areas with high rainfall will require different types of construction than dry areas with rare rain (not as common now, in view of the flash flooding everywhere, including "1,000-year floods").

A few years ago I was mixing wood ash from the wood stove with water and something else I cannot now recall, but it immediately brought to mind a distinction Dad made years ago, but which I never followed up on.

Dad would talk about getting more concrete blocks at times, and at other times, he would mention cinder blocks.  I remember the cinder blocks looked different and smelled different when wet.  And, years later on that day I had mixed wood ash with water and the other ingredient, I immediately remembered the cinder blocks, because the mix I was working with smelled remarkably similar to those cinder blocks.  It was an AHA moment, because I suddenly realized why they were referring to them as "cinder" blocks--they were made from cinders, or the burnt slag from some kind of fire, that is probably not wood, although am guessing wood ashes and cinders could also be used.

Here's what I'm getting at:  in a situation where you can't run to the nearest hardward store or big box outlet for supplies, how could/would you be able to concoct some type of mortar from materials found around the homestead, in the woods, or the landfill, or wherever?  I plan to experiment again with cinders or ash, sand, clay, sawdust or wheat straw/grass fiber, etc., and water.  Maybe there's something I'm forgetting, and if so, it will probably be remembered when the mix does not hold together!

It's definitely time to experiment.

Yes, indeed...

R.R. Book

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #68 on: June 10, 2019, 06:35:19 AM »
Please let us know when you figure out what the 3rd ingredient was, besides ashes and water.  Very interesting indeed!

ilinda

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #69 on: June 10, 2019, 06:51:26 PM »
Please let us know when you figure out what the 3rd ingredient was, besides ashes and water.  Very interesting indeed!
I wonder if it was actually two ingredients--sand and clay.  Clay would give it binding strength, and sand could keep it from  getting too gooey, and shrink.  Maybe this summer is a good time to experiment.

Jimfarmer

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #70 on: June 11, 2019, 12:11:52 AM »
Please let us know when you figure out what the 3rd ingredient was, besides ashes and water.  Very interesting indeed!
I wonder if it was actually two ingredients--sand and clay.  Clay would give it binding strength, and sand could keep it from  getting too gooey, and shrink.  Maybe this summer is a good time to experiment.

Old-fashioned adobe bricks were made of clay, sand, and straw.  Dwelling walls made from adobe have the convenient thermal property of taking 12 hours to pass a temperature change from one side to the other.   Hence, adobe buildings in the south-west USA, where temperatures are typically high during the day and low during the night,  are relatively cool during the day and warm during the night.

Socrates

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Re: slip straw
« Reply #71 on: January 09, 2020, 12:09:06 PM »
survival database
location, civilisation reboot, PERMACULTURE, postcataclysmic soil, Growing Soil 1.01

ilinda

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #72 on: January 09, 2020, 02:02:01 PM »
This type of finish would be excellent in locales where there's so much annual rainfall that it is best left for interior walls.

R.R. Book

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #73 on: January 09, 2020, 02:22:47 PM »
That looks both fun and practical Ilinda!  Seems that it would be sound-absorbent. 

...And the mice running around inside my walls at night would be so thankful to receive all that bedding!

 ;)

ilinda

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Re: Aftertime building: Cans and bottles; paper plastic and wood scrap
« Reply #74 on: January 10, 2020, 06:48:33 PM »
That looks both fun and practical Ilinda!  Seems that it would be sound-absorbent. 

...And the mice running around inside my walls at night would be so thankful to receive all that bedding!

 ;)
Can your cats get inside the walls?  If not, can you make a little trap door sort of like those "pet doors" in exterior doors?   (I do understand, as we have a similar problem.)

 

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