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Author Topic: Dowsing for water, digging wells etc.  (Read 8322 times)

Yowbarb

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Dowsing for water, digging wells etc.
« on: March 12, 2012, 02:23:38 AM »
Hi All, I think Moderator Jim farmer might have started a Topic on dowsing.
Or at least he has posted on it.
Going to start this Topic here since I am finding some videos on dowsing.
Here is just one video on dowsing, will post more soon.
Members please share any experience you have had with dowsing for water.
- Barb Townsend
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...
Water Dowsing Expert Jack Coel Proves Skill 2:52   39,649 Views

VIDEO: http://youtu.be/T7R8ul7vABM

Uploaded by jackcoelwaterdowsing on Mar 16, 2011
Website: http://www.jackcoelwaterdowsing.com
Jack Coel is a full time Dowser, some people call it water witching. Jack has been Dowsing for over 39 years and does over 400 locations a year. Jack Coel is listed in 34 telephone Directories and up to 10 newspapers. Jack travels over 70,000 miles a year to produce as much water as possible.

My mission in life is to find water. I have provided over 9,500 well sites the last 39 years, dowsing. I regularly and consistently outperform any technology, science, or part-time dowsing amateur in locating water. Large municipal or agricultural locations as well as domestic sources are identified.

Over the years, I have provided well sites for the U.S. Dept. of Interior, U.S. Bureau of Land Management, State of California, many municipalities, School Districts, many large agricultural wells, etc. I am the only full time professional Water Dowser in the western U.S. I can be found in 40 telephone directories and up to 15 newspapers in five states, and the Internet.

I charge $975.00 to Dowse per parcel. I charge travel at $50.00 per hour, one way. My fee typically amounts to the cost of 20-30 foot of drilling, sends you after your best source, and eliminates dry holes. I am coming from Upper Lake, CA in Lake County. I will consider any job, anywhere.

Reach me at Jack Coel (800) 787-2128 or (707) 350-2128 for International Calls Only.


steedy

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Re: Dowsing for water, digging wells etc.
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2012, 07:53:37 AM »
I watched a show the other day I think on NatGeo where they used dowsing to try to locate gold.  If the rod went up, it meant spirits were there, but if it went down, they were to dig for gold there.  They never found any gold though.  I mentioned this simply because of the rod going upwards.  I didn't know they could do that.

Yowbarb

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Re: Dowsing for water, digging wells etc.
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2012, 12:40:14 PM »
I watched a show the other day I think on NatGeo where they used dowsing to try to locate gold.  If the rod went up, it meant spirits were there, but if it went down, they were to dig for gold there.  They never found any gold though.  I mentioned this simply because of the rod going upwards.  I didn't know they could do that.

Thanks for posting... 

 :)

- Yowbarb

Yowbarb

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Re: Dowsing for water, digging wells etc.
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2012, 12:50:35 PM »
We do already have a whole Board about  dowsing. It's in the Members Only area.
Dowsing for Water and Herbs

Link:
http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?board=85.0

I want to keep this topic here anyway, for anyone who might benefit from it.
Members please post here any ideas, references or firsthand knowledge about dowsing for water.
Will be posting ere a few references, videos.
- Barb Townsend
  Topic Admin

Yowbarb

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Re: Dowsing for water, digging wells etc.
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2012, 01:01:43 PM »
Full Time Water Locator Water Dowsing Expert   1:47


News VIDEO: http://youtu.be/-qhyyjTy_wM

Uploaded by jackcoelwaterdowsing on Mar 16, 2011

Website: http://www.jackcoelwaterdowsing.com

Jack Coel is a full time Dowser, some people call it water witching. Jack has been Dowsing for over 39 years and does over 400 locations a year....
[Continues]

Jimfarmer

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Re: Dowsing for water, digging wells etc.
« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2012, 05:10:39 PM »
We do already have a whole Board about  dowsing. It's in the Members Only area.
Dowsing for Water and Herbs

Link:
http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?board=85.0

I want to keep this topic here anyway, for anyone who might benefit from it.
Members please post here any ideas, references or firsthand knowledge about dowsing for water.
Will be posting ere a few references, videos.
- Barb Townsend
 

can we move the whole topic out of Members Only?  It was not my intention, at least, to restrict  it thusly.

steedy

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Re: Dowsing for water, digging wells etc.
« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2012, 07:30:35 AM »
I didn't know you dowse for herbs!  Could you also, for instance, go into the woods and dowse for a walnut tree?  I only thought dowsing was for water only.  Wow, I need to learn how to do this!

Yowbarb

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Re: Dowsing for water, digging wells etc.
« Reply #7 on: March 13, 2012, 11:27:57 AM »
We do already have a whole Board about  dowsing. It's in the Members Only area.
Dowsing for Water and Herbs

Link:
http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?board=85.0

I want to keep this topic here anyway, for anyone who might benefit from it.
Members please post here any ideas, references or firsthand knowledge about dowsing for water.
Will be posting ere a few references, videos.
- Barb Townsend
 

can we move the whole topic out of Members Only?  It was not my intention, at least, to restrict  it thusly.

Hi Jim it took me awhile to figure out the previous existing dowsing topic was actually a whole Board in members only... I hadn't set up the boards and had forgot that.
I will message Marshall asap...he's on a project that keeps him occupied for a week more.
Meanwhile is it OK if we keep this Topic here. It could take awhile to move that board. I totally agree I want all the basic survival info to be readily accessible.
All The Best,
Barb

steedy

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Re: Dowsing for water, digging wells etc.
« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2012, 08:54:36 AM »
I had only heard of dowsing for water only, until I watched that show where they tried to dowse for gold.  I know I couldn't practise this in my yard because it would take me to water pipes!

Yowbarb

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Re: Dowsing for water, digging wells etc.
« Reply #9 on: March 14, 2012, 10:31:24 AM »
I had only heard of dowsing for water only, until I watched that show where they tried to dowse for gold.  I know I couldn't practise this in my yard because it would take me to water pipes!

Yes true one would need to try it out in a lot or on some open land.
(Haven't tried it yet.) I posted a few videos,
some in Spanish, French in the various International Survival Boards here.

Yowbarb

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Re: Dowsing for water, digging wells etc.
« Reply #10 on: February 08, 2019, 02:05:51 PM »
https://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/witching-for-water-zmaz70ndzgoe

Witching For Water

No matter what the origin, divining or dowsing or witching for water is practiced all over the world and despite scientific ridicule, water witches still flourish today.
By Jean McCamy | November/December 1970

Some say it started with Moses (Numbers 20:9-11). Some swear by the ancient Greeks. But the first written record of finding water with a forked twig is in Georgius Agricola's work, De re metallica, written in 1556.

No matter what the origin, divining or dowsing or witching for water is practiced all over the world and despite scientific ridicule, water witches still flourish today. Almost every area has a diviner or two; Wake County, North Carolina boasts more than a dozen. A few of the Wake County dowsers refer to their skill as witching (from the witch hazel, a popular divining rod of the early American settlers), but it's usually called finding a well, spotting a well, or—simply—finding water.

Witching for Water
Until his death a few months ago, Arthur Lee Brown was the best known dowser in Northern Wake County. He'd been witching for twenty-five years and found more than a hundred good wells. Arthur Lee claimed it came in spurts: You found a well for one person, and two or three other prospects cropped up.

Brown started divining by accident. A man came through who could witch, and Arthur Lee found out that he could, too. "Not everybody can do it, you know," he declared with conviction. "It just works for some folks." A freshly cut peach tree twig or a length of grapevine were Brown's favorite tools. He held them both palms down, with his thumbs turned in. The grape vine spun in his hands as he walked over the vein, and the forked stick pointed toward the ground.

Like most diviners, Brown wouldn't even guess why the switch worked. He just knew that it did. "There's a streak of water down under the ground," he explained, "and if you take even one step off to the side, the stick won't move. You have to be right on top of the water."

He told about a man who claimed he could figure the depth of the water, but Arthur Lee wasn't so sure. He could find water, but wouldn't go any further than that.

Continue reading: https://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/witching-for-water-zmaz70ndzgoe

Yowbarb

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Re: Dowsing for water, digging wells etc.
« Reply #11 on: February 18, 2019, 11:55:03 AM »
https://www.offthegridnews.com/how-to-2/7-things-you-better-learn-know-before-digging-a-well/

7 Things You Better Learn & Know Before Digging A Well
Written by: Kathy Bernier

Water is one of those commodities that many people take for granted. Like electricity or natural gas, a lot of us are accustomed simply to flipping a switch or turning a knob or lifting a handle, and there it is. It may be that we have not had occasion even to wonder about the manner in which it traveled from its source to our homes. It is provided by a municipal or for-profit entity, and all we have to do is pay the bill.

In most truly rural locations, people are on their own for water. Typically, that means having a private well. If you have never had to be responsible for water accession, the idea of doing so can be a little daunting.

If having a private well is new to you, following are a few basic facts about owning one that might be helpful to know before you take up homesteading or country life.

1. It is possible for a well to run dry. While there are different well-drilling technologies, different climates, and different demands for water, no well is completely infallible. When that happens, homesteaders are likely to be on their own. When piped-in water fails, the onus is upon the water company to rectify the problem. When a private well fails, it is the owner’s problem.

That said, it is uncommon for good quality wells to fail or run dry. Wells which are shallow, dug (as opposed to drilled), makeshift, poorly sited, or located in an arid climate are more likely to have problems than those which are deeper, professionally drilled, or in an area with a high underground water table and ample rainfall.

2. Well water is not tested unless the owner tests it. Again, in this age of having certain aspects taken care of for us by experts, it is easy to forget that rural living does not include all the same benefits. Out in the country, the only way we know what is in our water is to have it tested.

In my region, the process is simple and inexpensive. It amounts to picking up small plastic jars from a nearby commercial laboratory, following instructions for filling them at the kitchen faucet, and returning them to the lab. If you are unsure how to proceed where you live, ask your county cooperative extension, your municipal office, a state official or even a professional realtor.

3. Water can be contaminated by fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides or naturally occurring substances. Residue from a myriad of sources, from commercial crops to livestock to landfills to your own landscaping practices, can seep into groundwater. In addition to external contaminants, geology can play a large role in water quality. Toxins such as arsenic and radon are common in my region, and homeowners need to be diligent in determining levels of dangerous elements in their well water.

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Many toxins are treatable. Some are as easy as adding chlorine, and others require extensive mitigation equipment.

If you are purchasing a property with an existing well, be sure to test the water before you buy the property. If you are planning to build a well on property you already own, have the water evaluated as you proceed.

4. Additives are not present in well water unless the owner adds them. This can be both a benefit and a drawback to having your own private water source. You can control any chlorine or other chemical elements in your water, but you do not have the advantage of having what many consider to be beneficial additives. Some dental professionals say that children raised in impoverished rural areas have two strikes against them—not only the reduced access to dental care, but the lack of fluoride in drinking water. Other science suggests fluoride treatment is more of a risk than a benefit. The takeaway is simply this: Make sure you know what you are and are not getting in your water, and if there is something of value missing, be proactive about attaining it elsewhere.

5. The cost of creating a well depends greatly. Primarily, it rests upon the type of soil, the presence or not of ledge below the surface, and the type of well that is best for your geography. For example, a high water table — meaning that underground water stays close to the surface — and soft sandy soil can mean that a simple point well can serve nicely. These conditions are also more conducive to dug wells than are harder soils with a higher concentration of clay and ledge. For the latter, a well probably needs to be drilled with professional equipment, especially if the best reliable source of water lies deep below the surface.

6. Do not forget codes and regulations. Many areas have strict codes regarding the location and type of wells which can be created. You may or may not need a permit for your well. Check with your local authorities before you start to dig.

7. Well water travels from the well to your faucet by way of a pump. Homesteaders who are on the grid often use an electric well pump, which can be situated either inside the well itself or closer to the interior plumbing of the home. In-well pumps are more labor intensive and often more costly to install, while interior pumps are noisier. Interior pumps cost more to run, as well, since the act of pulling water takes more energy than pushing it.

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If you have an electric pump, you will lose the ability to draw water when the power goes out. If this is your situation, it is important to keep ample water on hand for possible outages. It is a good idea to keep a supply of clean water in sterile glass jars for human consumption, and larger amounts of water in plastic barrels for flushing.

Having a hand pump on your well, as either a primary pump or for use in emergencies—is an even better idea. If you can afford to add one to your existing pump setup, you are likely to someday be glad you did.

As an aside, not all rural water supplies rely upon a well at all. Some homesteaders and off-gridders successfully use nature’s power to provide them with water, utilizing such resources as rainwater, natural springs or other water bodies and harnessing gravity to move the water to where they need it. If you can get reliable water year-round without a well, go for it!

Among the many positive aspects of having your own well is the fact that you are not in danger of suffering from someone else’s bad decisions. You can be in charge of making sure there is no lead in your pipes and no contaminants in your groundwater. On the other hand, when something does go awry, it is your responsibility to correct it. But until something happens, there are no monthly bills for water, no unwanted chemicals, and often a far better taste. Once you become accustomed to the unique rewards and responsibilities of having your own well water, you will likely agree that living with a private well is worth what it takes to do it right.

What would you add to our list? Share your well water tips in the section below:

Yowbarb

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Re: Dowsing for water, digging wells etc.
« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2019, 12:00:25 PM »
Since wells have to do with water for survival, we can keep this particular well Topic going here.
Meantime,
Global Moderator R.R.Book has started this: 
New Topic: Water wells and pumps
Link:

https://planetxtownhall.com/index.php/topic,7132.msg109882.html#msg109882


 

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