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Author Topic: Seeds to bring  (Read 9885 times)

enlightenme

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #15 on: March 12, 2014, 07:13:20 PM »
Well, as you all probably know, I'm not real computer savy, so this information may be here in some form and I just didn't see it.  I was trying to decide what type of seeds I would pick up to throw in with my gotta have takealong stuff, just to have atleast some sort of a start if all else fails. And what would be the simplest, easy to grow in most climates.  I can remember those first few years on the farm putting in huge truck patch gardens with no experience or knowledge whatsoever, was challenging  and well to say the least it took a few years to kindof figure it out (and that was with all the resources of the current world available). I wouldn't say I actually became an expert, but anyway I decided to make a list of some of the easiest to grow that I'm going to pick up while the stock is probably still available this year (ofcourse making sure it's the good old-fashioned kind not that new Monsanto, or whatever that junk is) I'm going to make sure to get several kinds of Squash, Zucchini, beans (preferably bush not pole), tomatoes, and peppers. Also, onions (though those are really hard to grow from seeds instead of sets), beets and carrots (root vegies can be really challenging in my experience anyway unless the soil is just perfect), lettuce and spinach for fast grow, cucumbers  (great for pickling for later), corn (though you gotta put in a pretty big area, atleast double rowed if I remember correctly), peas and broccoli.  I think that's going to be my total short list.  Any other gardeners out there with additional suggestions/comments?? It's been awhile, I'm sure I've probably missed some pretty obvious ones that would make really great candidates for the gotta bring category.....
Hi Enlightenme,
I think probably the best way to go looking for seeds that aren't GMO Monsanto and all that, is when you do a search, Search "Heirloom vegetables", these are the old varieties and usually have a lot more flavour. Once you get some of these growing, then you can save the seeds yourself and stockpile them. I've got a pile of them myself, some I have sourced from growers on Ebay, and they don't cost an arm and a leg  :)
How are things going over in the states. I have heard things about some people not being allowed to grow their own veges etc... is this true?

First, so sorry for this belated reply to your post!  Thankfully I can report that I have heard of no such thing.  That would just be terrible!  There better not be anything like that, I'm sure there would be a major revolt!!  ;) ;D  The state that I live in, Pennsylvania is a very large farming area too, so I know the farmers around here would never put up with that nonsense!
Mary

steedy

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #16 on: April 14, 2014, 09:52:34 AM »
It only makes sense to have seeds of things you like to eat, and are able to grow in your area.  Also, it's a good idea to learn how to collect and save your own seeds too, not just because it's cheaper than having to buy new seeds every year, but also to save the seeds from the best producing plants.  That's how farmers have been doing it for years before the big hybrid companies, like Monsanto for instance, have told them to stop saving seeds.

There is a very easy method for saving tomato seeds and that is to cut your tomato in half and rub it onto a paper towel.  Let it dry and you can plant those seeds next year.

Other seeds, like pepper or beans, are very easy to save.  Let them dry before you store them in an airtight container.  I've used canning jars and even baggies for this.

Jimfarmer

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #17 on: April 14, 2014, 02:52:12 PM »
Quote
are able to grow in your area

Both before and after the pole shift.  Many regions will have a different climate afterwards.

enlightenme

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #18 on: April 14, 2014, 02:59:23 PM »
Quote
are able to grow in your area

Both before and after the pole shift.  Many regions will have a different climate afterwards.

Excellent point Jim!

steedy

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #19 on: April 14, 2014, 04:03:23 PM »
When do you expect the pole shift?

Jimfarmer

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #20 on: April 14, 2014, 08:33:35 PM »
When do you expect the pole shift?

My own personal wild guess is December of 2015.
My confidence in that prediction is low.

Now that so many predictions have been made over a period of many years, including even by Edgar Cayce, all of which have proven to be wrong, no source that I know of is making any more statements about timing other than to say "soon".  One popular reply to that is "Deja Poo - we have heard that crap before".

steedy

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #21 on: April 15, 2014, 04:04:28 PM »
I'm not concerned at all about a pole shift, mostly because ifwe get one, it won't be in my lifetime.  I'm more concerned about overall economic collapse.  Even if it's just your own personal collapse, or regional, but I think it'll be more global actually.

Yowbarb

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #22 on: April 15, 2014, 04:13:22 PM »
When do you expect the pole shift?

See theory at Marshall's new Topic:
http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=5508.msg79547#msg79547

Cut to the Chase - cttcRadio.com / Planet X Flyby Distance to Earth and Pole Shift — Carles Esquerda

« on: April 13, 2014, 08:49:40 PM »

Planet X Flyby Distance to Earth and Pole Shift — Carles Esquerda, Alcione Association

In this, his second appearance on Cut to the Chase, Carles Esquerda, Director of the Alcione Association shares with us the closest distance Planet X will come to the Earth and the consequences of that, namely a devastating pole shift. This comes from Carlos Muñoz Ferrada, a professional Chilean Astronomer and a contemporary of V.M. Rabolu.

Carles also offers a unique insight into how people around the globe are taking an interest in Planet X, which according to him is a red-tailed planet, five times the size of Jupiter. At Yowusa.com we refer to Hercolubus as the smaller sister sun to our own Sol, a brown dwarf at the core of of what we refer to as the Planet X System.

http://yowusa.com
http://cttcradio.com   http://yowusa.com/radio/

http://yowusa.com/radio/index.shtml#now

steedy

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #23 on: April 16, 2014, 06:35:23 AM »
Sorry about the italics. I didn't mean to put them in there.   :-[

enlightenme

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #24 on: April 16, 2014, 07:37:12 AM »
Sorry about the italics. I didn't mean to put them in there.   :-[

No problem!  ;D

Yowbarb

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #25 on: September 07, 2018, 06:07:40 AM »
https://www.offthegridnews.com/survival-gardening-2/20-must-have-seeds-to-store-for-a-crisis/

20 Must-Have Seeds To Store For A Crisis

Written by: Susan Patterson  Survival Gardening

[Excerpt from article]
Here’s a short list of the survival seeds you should have:

1. Radish

This hot little veggie may not be everybody’s favorite, but this root vegetable tops the list for being the fastest growing. It has a sowing-to-harvest time of just 20-30 days. You plant it today, and harvest it before the month is over. You can have a continuous harvest if you keep sowing the seeds every few days until the end of growing season.

2. Broccoli

Broccoli is nutrient-rich and gets ready in about three months. It is compact and can be planted one per every square foot. After harvesting the main head, you’ll get smaller heads from every side shoot, prolonging the harvest.

3. Onions

Onions are a kitchen essential; people usually grow them from onion sets, but they can be grown from seeds if you have four months of growing season. Or, grow the seedlings indoors and transplant them when all danger of frost is over. You can harvest some spring onions and onion leaves along the way. They are good companion plants for carrots.

Order your Heirloom Solutions seed catalog!

4. Lettuce

They’ll be ready to harvest in about 50 days, but if you select the loose-leaf varieties, leaves can be picked as soon as they become big enough.

5. Kale

Kale will take about two months to be ready for picking, but it grows well in all kinds of soils and is nutritious and versatile. Think of snacking on kale chips within two months of planting the seeds. You can have them from spring to fall with staggered plantings.

6. Tomatoes


This easy vegetable is one we cannot do without. There’s no excuse for not growing your own tomatoes; you can find a wide variety to grow in any USDA zone from two to 10. Take your pick from current, cherry or beefsteak varieties. If space is limited, you can stake them and grow them as a vertical crop. Excess crop, as there surely will be, can be sundried or processed into sauce.

7. Peppers

Grow some sweet peppers and some hot ones if you like. They can transform any bland dish into something special. There’s endless variety to choose from in a variety of rainbow colors. They take about two to three months to bear fruit, and they grow well in warmer months. Those with short growing seasons should sow early varieties indoors and transplant them into the garden when it is warm.

8. Spinach

Spinach may not give you iron arms, but it is an excellent source of iron and vitamins. It can be cooked into almost any dish. If you plant in early spring, plants will keep you in tasty leaves all through summer, starting from about 50 days of planting.

9. Cabbage

This cool weather crop gives you a substantial harvest from each plant. You can have a continuous supply by planting every two weeks, and have both early and late varieties, to extend the growing season. Surplus of winter crop will keep for five to six months in cool storage. Some can be turned into sauerkraut, too.

10. Corn

Corn is one cereal crop that meets the economy of space criteria. Standing tall and lean, each plant will give you at least two ears of corn. The trio of beans, squash and corn, together called “three sisters,” is still a great idea for a survival gardener.

11. Carrots

This cool-weather crop should be part of survival gardens because it can give you continuous yield with staggered planting and it can be harvested from under the snow cover in winter. Carrots grow well in USDA zones 4-10, but planting times vary. Each planting will give edible roots within two and a half to three months.

12. Beets

This cool season vegetable is favored for its ability to survive frost. Multiple plants can be grown just a few inches apart. It will take about two months from sowing to be ready for harvest, and will slightly pop out of the soil when it’s ready to pick.

13. Swiss chard


This is a fast-growing relative of the beet, grown for the tasty leaves. They become ready within two months of planting, and can give continuous harvest from the same plant as the outer leaves are used up. Grow in USDA zones 2-11.

14. Pumpkin

How can this crop, known for helping the early settlers survive in the new country, be excluded from the survival seed list? Even though they take about three to four months to mature, the crop is substantial and stores well. Pumpkins can be used in sweet and savory dishes, and offer a wide variety of vitamins and minerals in addition to carbohydrates. The seeds are excellent source of beneficial fatty acids, too.

15. Beans

These warm season vegetables come in so many varieties for the survival gardener to choose from. Bush beans give you yield in about two months of planting, while pole beans take longer, but give substantial harvest over a longer period. They are excellent companion plants. Using corn as their stalk will provide support for these climbers – and the beans will enrich the soil by fixing nitrogen. The young pods contribute to your vegetable dish, while the mature ones give you protein-rich beans which can be cooked fresh or stored for later use when dried.

16. Peas

What can be more delightful than eating peas straight off the plant, whether it is snap peas, snow peas or the good old English peas? Pick them within two months of planting and freeze or dry the excess harvest. Being cool season crops, snow peas can be grown in winter and spring.

17. Soy


Soy gets a bad rap these days, but that should be reserved for processed soy products. The soy bean is a highly nutritious food crop that can be a star in a survival garden. The Chinese were known to tide over famines on the strength of their soybean stock. They can be cooked in the pod as edamame, and the mature dry beans can give you protein-rich flour and soy milk to be used for a variety of dishes. It’s rich in carbohydrates, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and vitamins, besides being one of the few vegetable sources of complete protein.

18. Peanuts

Not exactly a nut, but this protein and fat-rich legume is an asset. They can be planted two to a foot and harvested in four months. They provide excellent harvest in the warmer Southern states, but early varieties can be cultivated in the Northern areas, too.

19. Sunflower

This is another native crop; it can be grown in Zones 7 to 11. They are low-maintenance and grow in poor soil as long as they get their share of sun. The large seed heads of each plant will give substantial quantity of tasty seeds. They can act as a support to other plants, too, and who can resist their cheery face?

20 Eggplant


It is an easily grown prolific vegetable that gives staggered harvest. It is versatile and can be used in stews, baked and grilled dishes or simply sautéed. Suitable for growing in Zones 4-10

Harvest seeds and store in a cool and dry location so that you can enjoy fresh garden veggies year after year — and be prepared for anything that may come!

ilinda

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #26 on: September 07, 2018, 09:19:29 AM »
https://www.offthegridnews.com/survival-gardening-2/20-must-have-seeds-to-store-for-a-crisis/

20 Must-Have Seeds To Store For A Crisis

Written by: Susan Patterson  Survival Gardening

[Excerpt from article]
Here’s a short list of the survival seeds you should have:

1. Radish

This hot little veggie may not be everybody’s favorite, but this root vegetable tops the list for being the fastest growing. It has a sowing-to-harvest time of just 20-30 days. You plant it today, and harvest it before the month is over. You can have a continuous harvest if you keep sowing the seeds every few days until the end of growing season.

2. Broccoli

Broccoli is nutrient-rich and gets ready in about three months. It is compact and can be planted one per every square foot. After harvesting the main head, you’ll get smaller heads from every side shoot, prolonging the harvest.

3. Onions

Onions are a kitchen essential; people usually grow them from onion sets, but they can be grown from seeds if you have four months of growing season. Or, grow the seedlings indoors and transplant them when all danger of frost is over. You can harvest some spring onions and onion leaves along the way. They are good companion plants for carrots.

Order your Heirloom Solutions seed catalog!

4. Lettuce

They’ll be ready to harvest in about 50 days, but if you select the loose-leaf varieties, leaves can be picked as soon as they become big enough.

5. Kale

Kale will take about two months to be ready for picking, but it grows well in all kinds of soils and is nutritious and versatile. Think of snacking on kale chips within two months of planting the seeds. You can have them from spring to fall with staggered plantings.

6. Tomatoes


This easy vegetable is one we cannot do without. There’s no excuse for not growing your own tomatoes; you can find a wide variety to grow in any USDA zone from two to 10. Take your pick from current, cherry or beefsteak varieties. If space is limited, you can stake them and grow them as a vertical crop. Excess crop, as there surely will be, can be sundried or processed into sauce.

7. Peppers

Grow some sweet peppers and some hot ones if you like. They can transform any bland dish into something special. There’s endless variety to choose from in a variety of rainbow colors. They take about two to three months to bear fruit, and they grow well in warmer months. Those with short growing seasons should sow early varieties indoors and transplant them into the garden when it is warm.

8. Spinach

Spinach may not give you iron arms, but it is an excellent source of iron and vitamins. It can be cooked into almost any dish. If you plant in early spring, plants will keep you in tasty leaves all through summer, starting from about 50 days of planting.

9. Cabbage

This cool weather crop gives you a substantial harvest from each plant. You can have a continuous supply by planting every two weeks, and have both early and late varieties, to extend the growing season. Surplus of winter crop will keep for five to six months in cool storage. Some can be turned into sauerkraut, too.

10. Corn

Corn is one cereal crop that meets the economy of space criteria. Standing tall and lean, each plant will give you at least two ears of corn. The trio of beans, squash and corn, together called “three sisters,” is still a great idea for a survival gardener.

11. Carrots

This cool-weather crop should be part of survival gardens because it can give you continuous yield with staggered planting and it can be harvested from under the snow cover in winter. Carrots grow well in USDA zones 4-10, but planting times vary. Each planting will give edible roots within two and a half to three months.

12. Beets

This cool season vegetable is favored for its ability to survive frost. Multiple plants can be grown just a few inches apart. It will take about two months from sowing to be ready for harvest, and will slightly pop out of the soil when it’s ready to pick.

13. Swiss chard


This is a fast-growing relative of the beet, grown for the tasty leaves. They become ready within two months of planting, and can give continuous harvest from the same plant as the outer leaves are used up. Grow in USDA zones 2-11.

14. Pumpkin

How can this crop, known for helping the early settlers survive in the new country, be excluded from the survival seed list? Even though they take about three to four months to mature, the crop is substantial and stores well. Pumpkins can be used in sweet and savory dishes, and offer a wide variety of vitamins and minerals in addition to carbohydrates. The seeds are excellent source of beneficial fatty acids, too.

15. Beans

These warm season vegetables come in so many varieties for the survival gardener to choose from. Bush beans give you yield in about two months of planting, while pole beans take longer, but give substantial harvest over a longer period. They are excellent companion plants. Using corn as their stalk will provide support for these climbers – and the beans will enrich the soil by fixing nitrogen. The young pods contribute to your vegetable dish, while the mature ones give you protein-rich beans which can be cooked fresh or stored for later use when dried.

16. Peas

What can be more delightful than eating peas straight off the plant, whether it is snap peas, snow peas or the good old English peas? Pick them within two months of planting and freeze or dry the excess harvest. Being cool season crops, snow peas can be grown in winter and spring.

17. Soy


Soy gets a bad rap these days, but that should be reserved for processed soy products. The soy bean is a highly nutritious food crop that can be a star in a survival garden. The Chinese were known to tide over famines on the strength of their soybean stock. They can be cooked in the pod as edamame, and the mature dry beans can give you protein-rich flour and soy milk to be used for a variety of dishes. It’s rich in carbohydrates, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and vitamins, besides being one of the few vegetable sources of complete protein.

18. Peanuts

Not exactly a nut, but this protein and fat-rich legume is an asset. They can be planted two to a foot and harvested in four months. They provide excellent harvest in the warmer Southern states, but early varieties can be cultivated in the Northern areas, too.

19. Sunflower

This is another native crop; it can be grown in Zones 7 to 11. They are low-maintenance and grow in poor soil as long as they get their share of sun. The large seed heads of each plant will give substantial quantity of tasty seeds. They can act as a support to other plants, too, and who can resist their cheery face?

20 Eggplant


It is an easily grown prolific vegetable that gives staggered harvest. It is versatile and can be used in stews, baked and grilled dishes or simply sautéed. Suitable for growing in Zones 4-10

Harvest seeds and store in a cool and dry location so that you can enjoy fresh garden veggies year after year — and be prepared for anything that may come!
Looks rather helpful, although I'll add a few stray comments.  If one is really pressed for space, or has a totally brown thumb, they could possibly forget the spinach, kale, Swiss Chard, broccoli, and cabbage, and count on growing the wild Lamb's Quarter for greens. 

We've never had a garden where they didn't volunteer.  Every fall or very late summer, I pick up the old plants whose seeds are now ready to fall where they will volunteer next year, and I just toss them where I want them--large piles of old, dead-looking plants.  It works every time.  Plus there will be volunteers in other spots as well, often more than you really want.  Lamb's Quarter is little work, with no seed to carefully save in messy envelopes, and is highly nutritious as well as tasty.

Another reason for dispensing with Swiss Chard is that it is in the same genus as beets and will readily cross-pollinate with them.  The pollen for them is so tiny that even screening either of them off will not prevent pollen from the other wafting inside and pollinating your prized plants.  I'd cringe if Swiss Chard pollinated my beets planted the following spring for seed!

And soy is cringeworthy due to its potential to have already been pollinated by GM soy which seems to be everywhere.

Peas are a wonderful crop but here in MO, my harvest was always so tiny that at the end of the season I might have one or two small freezer bags, and that's after early planting, carefully tending, etc.  I think they need more cool weather than MO.

Carrots are another crop that, although delicious and nutritious, just don't do well here unless you're in a more sandy region.  In this clay, they seem to have one growth spurt, growing from tiny to very small, and that's about all they do in this clay.

Last but not least eggplant is something I've tried to grow but found it to be extremely difficult.  Flea beetles will destroy the leaves, leaving a lace-like meshwork of former-leaves, that take most of the summer to recover.  Then it loves heat, and on and on.  I wish someone could tell me how to grow it.  None of my friends has luck either.  Only one gardening friend, 95 year old Bill, told me when he does grow it, he always leaves it in a pot, has it covered from flea beetles for all of spring and early summer, and it will not survive in the ground. 

Well, those seeds that I've eliminated are probably only relevant to the climate and conditions in Missouri, so maybe for many others, the list would be perfect. 

My own favorites for this locale would be:
beets
parsnips
sweet potatoes
Purple Peruvian potatoes
Yamiken winter squash
lettuce
collards
peanuts
Trail of Tears bean
Christmas lima
Baby Pam pumpkin
radish
peppers (sweet and hot, separated widely)
tomatoes
corns (many)
shallots (instead of onion--no seeds to save)
garlic
asparagus

Thanks for posting this listing, as it is food for thought as wel all live in very distinct regions with unique climate and growth conditions, and now is the time for pondering which seeds, bulbs, roots, rhizones, etc., you would need to save.  Now is the time, brothers and sisters, and this listing has given me the push I need.

 

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