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Author Topic: Seeds to bring  (Read 20084 times)

Jimfarmer

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #45 on: September 06, 2019, 10:33:18 PM »
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Who needs modern-day wheat anyway?

I recently found coconut flour at Walmart.  Haven't tried baking with it yet.  It has no gluten, so i'll add some chia seeds and/or metamucil for binder.  Any suggestions?

ilinda

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #46 on: September 07, 2019, 03:07:16 PM »
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Who needs modern-day wheat anyway?

I recently found coconut flour at Walmart.  Haven't tried baking with it yet.  It has no gluten, so i'll add some chia seeds and/or metamucil for binder.  Any suggestions?
If you try baking with coconut flour, and get not too successful results, think about making flatbreads which can be heated in a cast iron skillet.  When I make spelt flatbreads, which are just spelt dourdough and spelt flour, rolled out and flattened very thin, I cook them in an unoiled cast iron skillet until done on both sides.  Experimenting will tell you how high the heat, and when to flip them.

It seems coconut flour, chia, and ?metamucil? fashioned into flatbreads might be very interesting, plus tasty, as coconut has a natural sweetness.  Keep us posted.

ilinda

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #47 on: September 07, 2019, 03:08:52 PM »
Is the difference due to flavor?
Yes, the red not only tastes better, but seems more filling.  I/we always feel fuller after having eaten red quinoa, and remembering having eaten the "white" (beige) quinoa and feeling sort of empty.

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #48 on: September 08, 2019, 05:36:26 AM »
Good to know.

Re: Jim's question about coconut flour, and your subsequent answer Ilinda, am gathering that coconut flour may be oilier and heavier than bread flour?

I wonder if it still contains phytochemicals monolaurin and capryllic acid when ground into flour?  If so, then it could be an asset even if more difficult to work with...

I wonder what the shelf-life is compared with unbleached wheat flour (as opposed to whole wheat, which has a short lifespan)?

ilinda

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #49 on: September 08, 2019, 02:52:39 PM »
Good to know.

Re: Jim's question about coconut flour, and your subsequent answer Ilinda, am gathering that coconut flour may be oilier and heavier than bread flour?

I wonder if it still contains phytochemicals monolaurin and capryllic acid when ground into flour?  If so, then it could be an asset even if more difficult to work with...

I wonder what the shelf-life is compared with unbleached wheat flour (as opposed to whole wheat, which has a short lifespan)?
A year or two ago I bought a couple of different brands of coconut flour and have never really been sure of how to use them.  The one in my lap is unopened and is "Nutiva organic superfood gluten-free" and according to the nutrition facts label, serving size is 2 TBsp. and in each serving are: 2 g fat, 11g carbohydrates, and 4 g protein.

When I tried to use it as flour, my recollection is that it kept "demanding" more and more liquid--or something like that.  The memory of that left me feeling it was leading me by a rope and I didn't know where we were going, and wasn't sure what to add next.  I was experimenting, but never quite had an experience like that with wheat flour or spelt flour, etc. 

There is a recipe on this Nutiva bag for coconut blueberry chia muffins.  Ingredients called for are: coconut flour, baking soda, sea salt, raw honey, coconut milk, eggs, coconut oil, vanilla extract, chia seeds, and blueberries.

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #50 on: September 08, 2019, 04:00:43 PM »
They sound awesome!

Jimfarmer

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #51 on: September 15, 2019, 11:12:03 PM »
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It seems coconut flour, chia, and ?metamucil? fashioned into flatbreads might be very interesting, plus tasty, as coconut has a natural sweetness.  Keep us posted.

It didn't work.  Made pudding instead of pastry.

I'll look for better recipes.

Socrates

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« Reply #52 on: March 23, 2020, 11:07:23 AM »
love this vid, love this guy: If i had to pick ONLY three crops for a survival garden
So, a bit of a guessing game watching this [short] vid.  Is it 3 sisters? Will my favorite make the cut?
Amazingly, it seems my experience with RESEARCH connects with this kind of folks' experience. He's saying:
- beans
- butternut squash
- potatoes
But he mentions he's tormented 'cause there's also sweet potatoes and sunflowers.
As as survivalist, constantly thinking about the few things i should have on me at all times, this list is close to my heart.
So, from the above vid, it's clearly never about 3 things and should be at least about 6 things, i.e.:
- beans, butternut squash, potatoes
- sweet potatoes
- sun flowers
- corn

But then, in the spirit of SHTF preps that take into account that nothing might come back...:
- hemp
- cotton
- bamboo
- (and after reading Born to Run, i'll add chia seeds)
and animals...:
- islandic chickens
- Flemish giants [rabbits]
- honey bees
- silk worms
- kune kune pigs
- Ouessant sheep
- muscovy ducks
People, what am i leaving out? What did i forget?
Then, in a 'perfect' world, one would like to get some donkeys, dogs and miniature zebu [cows].
Fit all that in yer survival cave and let the 'new world' begin!
'nuff said. I think this is my plan and recipe for this year...


Seeds will survive. Some animals will survive [though some barely; think of cheetah's, all of which originated from a single parent].
Bees? There were no honey bees in the Americas until Europeans introduced them...
Silk worms? None until Asians introduced them...
Special breeds [dogs, sheep, cattle, etc.]? Forget about it.
DNA is about INFORMATION; that's books as well as livestock.
You know, right, that 30 domesticated animals come from the Anunnaki homeground? That aside from llamas and a few others, just about all animals we husband stem from this one region [Mesopotamia]?
In other words, You want it? You bring it along...
Chihuahuas?
Bacteria that form your favorite cheese?
The wool that makes up your blanket, coat or mattress?

Just look at the world today. I see them react to this coronavirus madness and think: amatures...
I've had 4 gallons of milk in storage for years. I've had 50 kg of rice for years! Loads of tins of sardines...
My problem is that i've yet to arrange my right survival LOCATION but clearly the entire world seems oblivious to the fact that TS might HTF at any given moment.
When November comes, i'm heading toward the south of Spain, god willing. With my books, my seeds and my livestock. If i see a huge celestial body or a Blue Kachina, i will take what i have and head inside the nearest (large) cave [obviously where i've set up shop].
That's that. Where else would one feel safe to live?
« Last Edit: March 23, 2020, 11:57:57 AM by Socrates »
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location, civilisation reboot, PERMACULTURE, postcataclysmic soil, Growing Soil 1.01

ilinda

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #53 on: March 23, 2020, 06:14:27 PM »
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It sounds as if you've been devoting a lot of thought to your plans, and they do come across as interestiing, intriguing, and adventuresome.

I have no idea if you've "left anything out" but here I've been pondering, besides Icelandic chickens, geese.  Geese eat grass and that would really save a lot of work of weed whacking.  Plus geese (I think) don't eat frogs, bugs, etc., so they would not bother our frogs and toads, or honeybees, etc.  Are there any downsides to geese, if one is looking for grass-mowing?

In your journey in November, will you be able to avoid crowds?  Just today I saw (and will post later tonight) an article about how bad the CoVid19 is in Spain, that sick patients are lying on the floor in the hospital halls, and waiting for beds.  As long as you avoid any cities, you will probably be OK.  Are you backpacking?  Will the new love in your life be sharing the cave?  Do you know if anyone else has their eyes on "your" cave? 

As November approaches, please keep us posted.

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #54 on: March 23, 2020, 06:36:57 PM »
Some grim stories of Spain in the news at the moment...take good care of yourself!

 

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