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Surviving the Planet X Tribulation

Author Topic: Seeds to bring  (Read 10971 times)

R.R. Book

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #30 on: October 16, 2018, 09:05:25 AM »
Well, the books look every bit as interesting as the seeds!

Have had some luck in the past getting older seeds to sprout by soaking them in warmish water, sometimes for several days.  There's a film online about a guy who finds old seeds from 100 years ago or something like that, and manages to sprout them after a bit of coddling.

ilinda

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #31 on: October 16, 2018, 07:31:46 PM »
One of the corn varieties I grew this year is a real winner.  It is supposedly a sweet corn, but the ancient sweet corns are slightly sweet, but not densely sugar sweet as are modern-day hybrids.  Plus, I plan to use this variety more for its dried seed kernels to be cooked as hominy, for flour for flatbreads, cornbreads, etc.

It is Red Guariji'o.  I cannot figure out how to put the accent over the second "i" with this keyboard, so I put an apostrophe in there.  This variety is so fertile, that while the cobs are drying on a table, one of the ears has kernels that have begun to germinate--right on the cob!  I have never seen this in my life, and there was no moisture trapped anywhere in the cobs, and only one cob has germinating occurring. 

I may pull those kernels off and plant them for an experiment, but really want the rest of the kernels to just sit there and dry!  BTW, we did eat four ears as sweet corn and it is very satisfactory as an ancient "sweet corn".   The seeds are from last year's crop, which grew from seeds ordered from Native Seeds Search in Arizona.

Notice in the closeup, those short white protrusions--they are the growing tips, just as one would see protruding from the ground after having planted corn in the spring.

R.R. Book

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #32 on: October 17, 2018, 04:21:27 AM »
I have never heard of that variety before.  What a beauty!

ilinda

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #33 on: October 18, 2018, 11:57:27 AM »
Native Seed Search in Arizona has many varieties of corn and other crops that have been grown for millenia by Natives of the desert Southwest.

ilinda

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #34 on: October 18, 2018, 12:02:21 PM »
The year 2018 will be remembered on this farm as the first year we harvested chestnuts.  Only one tree produced, but two flowered, which I understand is necessary for pollinization.  I have been planting a number of different types of chestnuts over the years, starting almost 20 years ago, so this is exciting, even though the harvest is meager.  It's OK.  They are mature trees now, and are said to produce every year, once mature.

The wonderful thing about chestnuts is that they are excellent food for herbivore livestock, and also nutritious for humans.  Think of the words of that song...."Roasting chestnuts by the fire....."

R.R. Book

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #35 on: October 18, 2018, 02:19:38 PM »
Do you roast and eat them yourself also, or feed them to the goats?

Would love a photo!

ilinda

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #36 on: October 19, 2018, 09:55:55 AM »
This is the chestnut photo I forgot yesterday. 

When production is higher as trees mature, goats will get many, but for now with so few, they are reserved for the humans here.  Someone showed me how to roast them a few years ago and it looks easy:  make an "X" incision on outer skin, then put on cookie sheet in oven on not-too-high temperature, but that is what I cannot recall.  Maybe 325 deg. F? 

When I roast peanuts, I use lower, around 275 or lower, to prevent burning.  Maybe chestnuts are a bit hardier and resistant to scorching?  I just found this on  youtube:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CJjk5759oSg
In this video she says 450 deg. F/230 deg. C and only for 5-10 minutes.  But after peeling them, then put them in oven a second time.  This is not the only method, but a good start.

R.R. Book

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #37 on: October 19, 2018, 11:29:41 AM »
Lovely!  This is putting me in the mood for the holidays... :)

Socrates

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Re: ancient and strong cereal seeds
« Reply #38 on: October 28, 2018, 11:54:29 AM »
At the present time, the Kusa Seed organization does not ship seed to addresses outside of the United States. Foreign seed orders must provide a United States ship-to address (the address of a friend or acquaintance in the United States who can receive packages for you; someone able to assume the responsibility of forwarding the package(s) to you).
And by the way! I was listening to a podcast and someone mentioned My US.com, a website that allows one to ship purchases to that they then forward abroad. Amazing, no?
I wish i would've heard about this option years ago, but whatever.
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R.R. Book

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #39 on: October 28, 2018, 11:56:42 AM »
Looks like that page is down, but if such a service exists, I can think of numerous locations in the U.K. that breed permaculture crop varieties that we can't get here...

Socrates

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Re: chestnuts
« Reply #40 on: October 28, 2018, 11:59:42 AM »
I've eaten them raw and roasted [in Paris there are guys roasting them on the sidewalk]. Raw is fine, roasted is great. This is a wonderful long term food. Too bad it takes 20 years before the harvests start, but then isn't that just the sad story about our age, i.e. that trees have been pushed aside in favor of 'agriculture'?
I always have a few as 'seeds' but i'm wondering how to keep them or how long they'll keep.
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Socrates

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Re: myus.com
« Reply #41 on: October 28, 2018, 12:06:12 PM »
Looks like that page is down, but if such a service exists, I can think of numerous locations in the U.K. that breed permaculture crop varieties that we can't get here...
Link works for me...  ::)
Of course i've been mainly trying to supply through UK options, but in the end there are unique options all over the world and sometimes there's only one source to be found, no matter how big the internet is. For instance, i was looking for grass seed mixes and ultimately only Cotswold could supply seeds for foggage farming [i.e. various types of grass seed together].
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