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Author Topic: The Moon  (Read 56947 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: The Moon
« Reply #120 on: April 15, 2014, 11:44:19 AM »
Yowbarb Note - I missed out on the blood moon and the lunar eclipse.
Did anyone see it?
You can post your observations and images here. NASA Video discussion below...
.....................................................................

http://www.spaceweather.com/ 

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2014/27mar_tetrad/    A Tetrad of Lunar Eclipses

VIDEO on page

March 27, 2014:  For people in the United States, an extraordinary series of lunar eclipses is about to begin.

The action starts on April 15th when the full Moon passes through the amber shadow of Earth, producing a midnight eclipse visible across North America. So begins a lunar eclipse tetrad—a series of 4 consecutive total eclipses occurring at approximately six month intervals.  The total eclipse of April 15, 2014, will be followed by another on Oct. 8, 2014, and another on April 4, 2015, and another on Sept. 28 2015.

"The most unique thing about the 2014-2015 tetrad is that all of them are visible for all or parts of the USA," says longtime NASA eclipse expert Fred Espenak.

On average, lunar eclipses occur about twice a year, but not all of them are total.  There are three types:

A penumbral eclipse is when the Moon passes through the pale outskirts of Earth’s shadow.  It’s so subtle, sky watchers often don’t notice an eclipse is underway. 

A partial eclipse is more dramatic.  The Moon dips into the core of Earth’s shadow, but not all the way, so only a fraction of Moon is darkened.

A total eclipse, when the entire Moon is shadowed, is best of all.  The face of the Moon turns sunset-red for up to an hour or more as the eclipse slowly unfolds.

Usually, lunar eclipses come in no particular order. A partial can be followed by a total, followed by a penumbral, and so on.  Anything goes. Occasionally, though, the sequence is more orderly. When four consecutive lunar eclipses are all total, the series is called a tetrad.

image
Click to view a complete visibility map of the April 15th lunar eclipse.
http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/OH/OHfigures/OH2014-Fig01.pdf

"During the 21st century, there are 8 sets of tetrads, so I would describe tetrads as a frequent occurrence in the current pattern of lunar eclipses," says Espenak. "But this has not always been the case. During the three hundred year interval from 1600 to 1900, for instance, there were no tetrads at all."

The April 15th eclipse begins at 2 AM Eastern time when the edge of the Moon first enters the amber core of Earth’s shadow.  Totality occurs during a 78 minute interval beginning around 3 o’clock in the morning on the east coast, midnight on the west coast.  Weather permitting, the red Moon will be easy to see across the entirety of North America.

Why red?

A quick trip to the Moon provides the answer: Imagine yourself standing on a dusty lunar plain looking up at the sky. Overhead hangs Earth, nightside down, completely hiding the sun behind it. The eclipse is underway.

You might expect Earth seen in this way to be utterly dark, but it's not. The rim of the planet is on fire! As you scan your eye around Earth's circumference, you're seeing every sunrise and every sunset in the world, all of them, all at once. This incredible light beams into the heart of Earth's shadow, filling it with a coppery glow and transforming the Moon into a great red orb.

Mark your calendar for April 15th and let the tetrad begin.

More information about the lunar eclipse may be found on NASA's eclipse home page
http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse.html

Credits:
Author: Dr. Tony Phillips | Production editor: Dr. Tony Phillips | Credit: Science@NASA





enlightenme

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Re: The Moon
« Reply #121 on: April 15, 2014, 03:27:52 PM »
No, I didn't get to.  I was really disappointed too!  It was clear out up until about 10 pm, and then it got so cloudy and overcast there was no way I was going to be able to see anything.

Yowbarb

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Re: The Moon
« Reply #122 on: April 15, 2014, 04:04:22 PM »
No, I didn't get to.  I was really disappointed too!  It was clear out up until about 10 pm, and then it got so cloudy and overcast there was no way I was going to be able to see anything.

Sorry U missed it too.
I think it was clear here, but I was sleeping like the dead all night. At 0500 AM EDT I saw the big, beautiful white full moon and brightly - lit small clouds.
My son saw the blood moon but not the eclipse he was awakened by a high - speed chase right near his work site (camper they were all in) fugitive and a bunch of cops cars went tearing past their camper. Son Wes went out and saw the blood moon about 2 AM CDT. (Texas.)

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Re: The Moon
« Reply #123 on: April 15, 2014, 04:06:50 PM »
I missed the moon too, and I was out around 4 AM. There was NO moon in my area.  I had been excited because the moon had been bright and it was partly cloudy around 11 PM.  I was disappointed I missed it.  But we get 3 more chances before 2015 is out.

Yowbarb

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Re: The Moon
« Reply #124 on: April 15, 2014, 09:45:08 PM »
I missed the moon too, and I was out around 4 AM. There was NO moon in my area.  I had been excited because the moon had been bright and it was partly cloudy around 11 PM.  I was disappointed I missed it.  But we get 3 more chances before 2015 is out.

When I went out at 5 AM EDT the moon was fairly high in the western sky...

Yowbarb

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Re: The Moon
« Reply #125 on: May 23, 2014, 01:38:24 PM »
Re the meteor shower in the wee hours -predawn tomorrow:

Excerpt from Spaceweather -
  http://www.spaceweather.com/

Earth won't be the only body passing through the debris zone. The Moon will be, too. Meteoroids hitting the lunar surface could produce explosions visible through backyard telescopes on Earth.

Yowbarb

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Re: The Moon
« Reply #126 on: May 24, 2014, 01:44:22 AM »
At 0415 AM EDT the moon was reddish orange not far above the horizon. Too hazy though, to see meteors.
By 0440 the moon had lightened up to a golden color but even more haze.

Yowbarb

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Re: The Moon
« Reply #127 on: November 22, 2014, 06:26:06 AM »
http://www.spaceweather.com/

LUNAR TRANSIT OF THE SUN:
On Saturday, Nov. 22nd, the Moon will pass in front of the sun, producing a partial solar eclipse visible only from Earth orbit. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory will record the event, simulated here. (Note - the movie doesn't seem to play. Check it in awhile, BT.) http://sdoisgo.blogspot.com/2014/11/another-lunar-transit-november-22-2014.html

Stay tuned for a crescent sun.

Yowbarb

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Re: The Moon
« Reply #128 on: February 03, 2015, 08:02:19 AM »
http://www.spaceweather.com/

SNOW MOON AND JUPITER: There's a full Moon tonight, and according to folklore it has a special name: the Snow Moon, so-called because northern snow often falls most heavily in February. This year the Snow Moon is in conjunction with Jupiter. Look for the duo rising together in the east just after sunset on Feb. 3rd.

Yowbarb

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Re: The Moon
« Reply #129 on: March 08, 2015, 05:33:25 PM »
There was a "mini moon" not long ago now a Supermoon will be coming up during the Spring equinox. This will be an unusual event. On the morning of the Spring equinox the sun will be covered up 98% by the moon.

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/technology-science/science/spring-equinox-supermoon-solar-eclipse-5286245

Spring equinox, Supermoon, solar eclipse 98% morning of March 20, 2015

Yowbarb

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Re: The Moon
« Reply #130 on: January 22, 2016, 10:03:17 PM »
Yowbarb Note: Saturday night is the Wolf Moon.
Jan. 23 Sa.  08:46 PM
http://www.calendar-12.com/moon_phases/2016
...
http://www.spaceweather.com/

WOLF MOON: Can you hear them howl? According to folklore, tonight's full Moon is the "Wolf Moon," named long ago by Native Americans after the singing packs of wolves they heard during the winter month of January. Look east at sunset and enjoy the Wolf moonlight.

Yowbarb

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Re: The Moon
« Reply #131 on: August 17, 2016, 03:40:50 PM »
http://spaceweather.com/

SOMETHING FISHY: According to folklore, this weekend's full Moon is the Sturgeon Moon, named by Native American tribes of the Great Lakes who caught lots of sturgeon during the month of August. A Moon named after an ancient bony fish? Go outside and take a look. It's prettier than it sounds:

Yowbarb

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Re: The Moon
« Reply #132 on: November 11, 2016, 09:16:38 PM »
http://spaceweather.com/

THE BIGGEST FULL MOON IN ALMOST 70 YEARS: On Monday night, Nov. 14th, there's going to be a full Moon--the biggest and brightest in almost 70 years.  Members of the press are calling it a "supermoon."  The scientific term is "perigee Moon." These terms mean the same thing: The Moon is going to be as much as 14% bigger and 30% brighter than lesser moons we have seen in the past.

"The last time we had such a close full Moon was January 26, 1948," says Geoff Chester of the US Naval Observatory, "and it won't happen again until November 25, 2034."

Full moons vary in size because the Moon's orbit is not a circle, it's an ellipse. One side of the Moon's orbit (perigee) is 50,000 km closer to Earth than the other side (apogee): diagram. This Monday's Moon becomes full about 2 hours away from perigee, a coincidence that makes it remarkable.

But will we be able to tell the difference ... just by looking?  A 30% difference in brightness can easily be masked by clouds or the competing glare of urban lights.  Also, there are no rulers floating in the sky to measure lunar diameters. Hanging high overhead with no reference points to provide a sense of scale, one full Moon looks much like any other.

"I think that the hype over the term 'supermoon' is a bit overblown," says Chester.  "In my book every full Moon has something to offer!"

To get the most out of Monday's apparition, Chester makes this recommendation: "Try to catch the Moon just as it is rising."  A perigee Moon magnified by the Moon Illusion could look super, indeed.
...
http://www.space.com/34676-closest-supermoon-since-1948-surprising-facts.html

https://youtu.be/sWAN0FwfD5M    ScienceCasts: 2016 Ends with Three Supermoons

Yowbarb

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Re: The Moon
« Reply #133 on: October 04, 2017, 07:10:25 PM »
Yowbarb Note: There's a full moon arriving tomorrow, a Harvest moon. It will reach its reached the fullest point in the afternoon.
...

http://abc7chicago.com/weather/why-this-years-harvest-moon-will-be-unique/2488541/

Wednesday, October 04, 2017 03:16PM

Why this year's Harvest Moon will be unique



The Harvest Moon is the first full moon that is closest to the autumnal equinox, but this year's moon will be a little later than usual.

This 2017 Harvest Moon arrives on Thursday, October 5. Usually, the Harvest Moon occurs in September, but this year, the October full moon arrived closer to the fall equinox. So, it takes home the Harvest Moon title.

Technically, the moon will be 100 percent full at 2:40 p.m. EST which is still daylight for us, but the moon will still look fairly full after sunset.

One thing that's unique about the Harvest Moon is the timing of moonrise - when the moon rises above the horizon - after the full moon.

During a regular month, the moon normally rises about 50 minutes later each day. But after a Harvest Moon, the moon rises only 30-35 minutes later each day.

To the naked eye, that lower difference in the moonrise timing will make it seem like we'll have a full moon night.

The Harvest Moon isn't any bigger or brighter than your normal full moon.

Like any other full moon, it does appear to have an orange tint in some cases as it rises along the horizon.

When you look towards the horizon, you are looking through a greater thickness of the earth's atmosphere, compared to when you look up at the sky.

That thicker atmosphere scatters blue light very efficiently, but it lets our eyes see more red. That's why the moon looks more orange.

Yowbarb

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Re: The Moon
« Reply #134 on: December 14, 2017, 09:00:33 PM »
The last New Moon of this year will appear, December 17th

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