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Author Topic: Bless The Beasts Two By Two, Pt 2 helping them survive  (Read 75453 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: Protecting animals now - doing what we can...petitions, etc.
« Reply #90 on: April 28, 2012, 07:27:03 AM »
True, Mel we all need to take action and fortunately with these online petitions it only takes a few seconds. These petitions really do help...
Thanks,
Yowbarb

inselemel

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Re: Protecting animals now - doing what we can...petitions, etc.
« Reply #91 on: April 28, 2012, 07:50:18 AM »
True, Mel we all need to take action and fortunately with these online petitions it only takes a few seconds. These petitions really do help...
Thanks,
Yowbarb

Thanks Yowbarb Yep we all need to take action as Martin Luther King said
"Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter."

Yowbarb

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Re: Protecting animals now - doing what we can...petitions, etc.
« Reply #92 on: May 05, 2012, 05:46:20 AM »
Mel, maybe you already posted this...
Someone recently posted the Watcher site (thanks for that.) On the Watcher site, I saw this heartwrenching story,
Yowbarb

.................................................................................................

The Watchers home page:
http://thewatchers.adorraeli.com/

http://thewatchers.adorraeli.com/2012/05/03/sumatran-elephant-found-poisoned-by-humans-in-indonesia/

Environmental organization WWF called on the government Wednesday to investigate the death of a critically endangered Sumatran elephant allegedly poisoned at an Indonesian oil palm plantation. A ranger at the plantation in Krueng Ayon village, Sampoiniet subdistrict, Aceh Jaya district, on Sumatra island said he found the 18-year-old female elephant dying on Monday and that locals reported they had seen it walking around with a calf earlier that day according to JakartaGlobe.

“When I found her, she was foaming at the mouth and bleeding from the rectum, which are strong signs of poisoning,” Mukhtar, the ranger  said, adding that he was unable to save her with medicine.

Mukhtar said the elephant’s calf was “crying” and “making noises” of distress as it stood by its mother dying on the ground. The conflict between animals in the jungle and humans had increased in the past decade as swathes of forest are cleared for agriculture. WWF changed the Sumatran elephant’s status from “endangered” to “critically endangered” in January, largely due to severe habitat loss driven by oil palm and paper plantations.

The Sumatran elephant is a rare and protected animal facing extinction because of illegal logging, lost habitat, and poachers.  There are less than 3,000 Sumatran elephants remaining in the wild, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature, marking a 50 percent drop in numbers since 1985.

In its latest “red list” of threatened species, the IUCN noted that many of the remaining elephant communities were likely to disappear because they do not live in protected areas and there is a high risk of conflicts with humans. It cited studies showing that at least six herds disappeared between 2007 and 2009 in Riau province – a centre for the paper, pulp and palm oil industries. As plantations have expanded, Sumatra has experienced some of the worst deforestation rates in the world. Conservation groups said the Indonesian island has lost more than two-thirds of its natural lowland forest – the most suitable habitat for elephants – in the past 25 years.

The decline of the Sumatran elephant. (Illustration: guardian.co.uk)

Sumatran elephants are the smallest of the Asian elephants. Males rarely develop long tusks, while those of adult females may be so short that they are hidden by the upper lip. This elephant can live up to 70 years in captivity. Sumatran elephants were once widespread on Sumatra.  Today, however, the subspecies only survives highly fragmented populations.  Within the last 25 years, the elephants have lost 70% of their habitat. According to IUCN, 85% of the animal’s remaining habitat is unprotected and likely to be converted for agriculture or other purposes.

Specific problems are associated with forest conversion to plantation development. As forests shrink, elephants are increasingly closer to fields and cultivated land, generating conflict with humans that often results in the death of the elephants by poisoning or capture, as well as economic losses to humans. (WWF)

The Javan rhino was declared extinct in Vietnam in October after the last one was found dead with a bullet in its leg and its horn sawn off. A month later, it was followed by Africa’s western black rhinoceros and warnings that the Sumatran rhino is on the brink of extinction in Indonesia.

...................
« Last Edit: May 05, 2012, 05:48:35 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Protecting animals now - doing what we can...petitions, etc.
« Reply #93 on: May 05, 2012, 06:04:07 AM »
Inselemel I responded to your Facebook sharing and signed the petition...
Sent it to some friends.
thanks,
Yowbarb


Thanks for signing the petition.
 
Can you help Stop Trade in Rhino Horn reach its goal of 10000 signatures?
Invite Friends
10084
Barbara Lou Townsend Palm Harbor, FL

Thanks for signing the petition.
.............

Yowbarb Note. Repeating, from The Watcher: The Javan rhino was declared extinct in Vietnam in October after the last one was found dead with a bullet in its leg and its horn sawn off. A month later, it was followed by Africa’s western black rhinoceros and warnings that the Sumatran rhino is on the brink of extinction in Indonesia.
The Sumatran elephant is "critically endangered because of illegal logging, lost habitat and poachers." 

Yowbarb

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Re: Protecting animals now - doing what we can...petitions, etc.
« Reply #94 on: May 08, 2012, 09:26:17 AM »
Honestly I don't even want to post about this. just read the flaming petition and you will see why it needs to be signed...
This type of cruelty toward animals is called an abomination.
- Yowbarb

http://www.change.org/suggested?petition_id=341544

http://www.change.org/petitions/us-military-stop-shooting-cutting-open-and-breaking-the-limbs-of-living-animals

inselemel

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Re: Protecting animals now - doing what we can...petitions, etc.
« Reply #95 on: May 08, 2012, 12:06:17 PM »
Signed - couldn't watch the video -  just seen on fb a woman grinning at the camera over killing a lion and sticking a can of beer in its jaws to get a 'funny' photo and  a Rhino Legally killed in a trophy hunt. I wish this hell would stop. Do not understand the mentality of these people who take pleasure in killing sentient beings. OMG i have had enough of human beings. :'(

Yowbarb

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Re: Protecting animals now - doing what we can...petitions, etc.
« Reply #96 on: May 08, 2012, 12:06:35 PM »
I signed this petition earlier today.
- Yowbarb
......................................................................................
http://www.change.org/petitions/us-military-stop-shooting-cutting-open-and-breaking-the-limbs-of-living-animals

Dear Barbara,

Thanks for signing my petition, "US Military: Stop Shooting, Cutting Open, and Breaking the Limbs of Living Animals."

Winning this campaign is now in your hands. We need to reach out to as many friends as we can to grow this campaign and win.

Thanks for your support,

James

Yowbarb

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Re: Protecting animals now - doing what we can...petitions, etc.
« Reply #97 on: May 08, 2012, 12:08:46 PM »
Signed - couldn't watch the video -  just seen on fb a woman grinning at the camera over killing a lion and sticking a can of beer in its jaws to get a 'funny' photo and  a Rhino Legally killed in a trophy hunt. I wish this hell would stop. Do not understand the mentality of these people who take pleasure in killing sentient beings. OMG i have had enough of human beings. :'(

Mel I surely know how U feel...
I believe there has always been in insensitive, amoral component to what we call human...it is shocking when it comes out and is so plainly visible...
All we can do is try to keep creating a real civilization...we  aren't there yet.

inselemel

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Re: Protecting animals now - doing what we can...petitions, etc.
« Reply #98 on: May 08, 2012, 12:15:18 PM »
Signed - couldn't watch the video -  just seen on fb a woman grinning at the camera over killing a lion and sticking a can of beer in its jaws to get a 'funny' photo and  a Rhino Legally killed in a trophy hunt. I wish this hell would stop. Do not understand the mentality of these people who take pleasure in killing sentient beings. OMG i have had enough of human beings. :'(

Mel I surely know how U feel...
I believe there has always been in insensitive, amoral component to what we call human...it is shocking when it comes out and is so plainly visible...
All we can do is try to keep creating a real civilization...we  aren't there yet.

Yes you are so right, No we ain't there yet, unfortunately :'( :'( :'(
One day, oh Glorious day!

Willsorr75

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Re: Protecting animals now - doing what we can...petitions, etc.
« Reply #99 on: May 08, 2012, 12:16:51 PM »
Does anyone know if I were to give a pet potassium iodide if it would keep them safe from radiation exposure? Not sure if it works the same with animals as it does humans?
Stay informed, information is our first line of defense!
-Will

Yowbarb

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Re: Protecting animals now - doing what we can...petitions, etc.
« Reply #100 on: May 08, 2012, 03:02:21 PM »
Does anyone know if I were to give a pet potassium iodide if it would keep them safe from radiation exposure? Not sure if it works the same with animals as it does humans?

Willsorr I just found this, state government info. I would recommend printing this but go to the page and print out any links there that might be needed. I hope it helps. This is the main info:
[ KI comes in 130 mg and 65 mg bottles. Pro-KI™ 65 mg recommends the following dosages for pets (www.aaoobfoods.com/NBC.htm): Large dogs: 1.0-2.0 tablets per day
 Medium dogs: 0.5-1.0 tablets per day
 Cats and small dogs: 0.25-0.5 tablet per day ]

- Yowbarb
...

http://www.mbah.state.ms.us/emergency_programs/ki_vets.htm
Potassium Iodide (KI) Treatment for Animals Following a Nuclear Disaster

FACT SHEET for VETERINARIANS

What is the most important thing owners can do to protect their animals in a Nuclear Disaster?

Plan ahead. Animal owners should make plans in advance with friends, relatives, or shelters for housing their pets in a disaster. This will be helpful for a nuclear accident or any natural disaster.
Animal owners should be encouraged to purchase pet carriers.
Owners can use regular veterinary check-ups to practice evacuation plans from their homes.
 Owners should have copies of their pet’s health records, including rabies vaccination.
Owners should have their pets micro-chipped for easy identification in an emergency.

 What is KI treatment and what does it do?
 Potassium iodide (KI) is a salt of iodine. It is one of several ingredients that can be added to tale salt to make it iodized.
 KI has also been approved by the FDA as a nonprescription drug for use as a “blocking agent” to prevent the human thyroid gland from absorbing radioactive iodine.
 December 10, 2001 the Food and Drug Administration issued Guidance: Potassium Iodide as a Thyroid Blocking Agent in Radiation Emergencies for use of KI in humans during a radiological emergency. There is no such national guidance for use of KI in animals available.
 KI has a wide margin of safety, however like all medications, KI can be toxic if dosed incorrectly. Documented side effects include vomiting, drooling, runny eyes, rash, collapse and death. KI should not be used in animals with a known allergy to iodine. Suggested dose guidelines are listed below.
 KI is a medication that can be given to humans and animals.
 KI may not provide people or animals with 100% protection against all radioactive iodine.
The effectiveness of KI as a thyroid blocking agent is greatest if administered before the time of exposure to radioactive iodine, but some exposure saving can be obtained by administration shortly after exposure.

 Should pets be given KI for radiological emergencies?

 There are no guidelines for administration of KI for pets during an emergency. However, your clients may ask you to give KI to their pets if they have received it Potassium Iodide (KI) Treatment for Animals Following a Nuclear Disaster because of a radiological exposure. Administration of KI should be determined by you with the owner. The following information is provided to assist you with that decision. This information is provided as guidance and recommendations only.
 KI lessens the damage to the thyroid from radioactive iodine only. KI does not protect against other harmful radioactive rays released during a nuclear disaster.
 Radiation is most harmful to young, actively growing animals.
 KI must be given before or within 4 hours of exposure to be effective.
KI is an over-the-counter medication and you may want to stock it if there is demand in your area or special order it for the owner.
 Do not give KI to your pet if it is sensitive to iodine.
 Consider the age of the animal. Young animals have the highest risk of health problems from radioactive iodine and radioactive iodine causes long-term potential for thyroid cancer. Therefore, if the animal is elderly there is little chance the animal will get thyroid cancer in its lifetime (one estimate for humans was about 4 years) and elderly pets may have more problems with side effects from the KI.

 Note: If a pet has been left on the property during an exposure and the owner is unable to retrieve it before 4 hours then KI will not be effective. If the pet is evacuated with the owner prior to exposure to radiation, there is no need for KI. It is our recommendation that KI only be considered for the pet if the owner has received it and the pet is with the owner.

Where can veterinarians find information regarding dosing and efficacy of KI?

 Journal articles on the subject include:
 Use of radioiodine urinalysis for effective thyroid blocking in the first few hours post exposure - Health Phys 1999 Jan;76(1):11-6
 Potassium iodate and its comparison to potassium iodide as a blocker of 131I uptake by the thyroid in rats - Health Phys 1993 Nov;65(5):545-9 Reference the abstracts on page 3 of this document
 KI comes in 130 mg and 65 mg bottles. Pro-KI™ 65 mg recommends the following dosages for pets (www.aaoobfoods.com/NBC.htm): Large dogs: 1.0-2.0 tablets per day
 Medium dogs: 0.5-1.0 tablets per day
 Cats and small dogs: 0.25-0.5 tablet per day

 Where can I get further information?
 Contact your veterinarian with questions relating to KI and your pets.
www.nukepills.com has information about KI pills.
Mississippi Board of Animal Health (1-888-722-3106; www.mbah.state.ms.us)

 REFERENCES ON KI DOSING AND EFFICACY

 Health Phys 1999 Jan;76(1):11-6

 Use of radioiodine urinalysis for effective thyroid blocking in the first few hours post exposure, Ribela MT, Marone MM, Bartolini P. Department of Application of Nuclear Techniques in Biological Sciences, IPENCNEN, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo, Brazil.

A useful correlation between maximum thyroid uptake and radioiodine urine levels at different times after exposure was developed in order to determine when the intervention with an adequate blocking agent might still be effective. In an animal model (dog), six different doses were administered in the range of 100-600 kBq. The best correlation was found between the 125I uptake after 48 h (T-48) and urine radioactivity 4-6 h (U-4, U-5, U-6) after exposure. For the case of U-4, the equation Y(T-48) = 0.790 X(U-4) + 2.973 (r = 0.974 with a level of significance of p < 0.001) was obtained. An analogous study, carried out in humans (n = 20) to whom 1311 was administered, showed a similar correlation and level of significance: Y(T-24) = 1.162 X(U-4)+3.263 (r = 0.926; p < 0.001). The validity of this correlation was confirmed in four volunteers who received small doses of 125I(25-100 kBq), with good agreement between measured and extrapolated thyroid uptake and a mean difference of less than 10% (CV = 16.2%). Three different blocking agents were then tested in the same dog: potassium iodide, potassium perchlorate, and a thionamide (Tapazole). The blocking action of the first two compounds was about 90%, as opposed to only 48% for the third compound. Potassium iodide was chosen for its limited side effects and more universal utilization. The final study, carried out with four different doses, indicated that 25 mg of KI is the ideal amount to be administered to the dog. This corresponds to approximately 100 mg for a 70 kg human being (i.e., 1.4 mg kg(-1)). This dose, when administered to a volunteer 4 h after exposure, provided a thyroid blocking of 68%. web link

Health Phys 1993 Nov;65(5):545-9

Potassium iodate and its comparison to potassium iodide as a blocker of 131I uptake by the thyroid in rats, Pahuja DN, Rajan MG, Borkar AV, Samuel AM.

Radiation Medicine Centre, B. A. R. C., Parel, Bombay.

Potassium iodide is the preferred thyroid blocker for personnel handling radioiodine and is recommended as a prophylaxis for the population in the nearfield of a nuclear reactor which would be likely to be exposed to radioiodine in an accidental breach of containment. However, in hot and humid climates, this hygroscopic chemical has a poor shelf life due to hydrolytic loss of iodine vapors. On the other hand, another iodine-rich salt, potassium iodate (KIO3), is quite stable and has a much longer shelf life. The present study compares potassium iodide and KIO3 as thyroid blockers and examines the appropriate time at which they should be administered in case of radioiodine exposure. Either of the two were given in recommended dosage (100 mg stable iodine per 70 kg body weight) at -2, 0, +2, +4, +6, and +8 h after administration of tracer quantities of radioiodine (131I) to age-, weight-, and sex-matched rats. 131I uptake in thyroid was measured 24 h after its administration in the experimental animals and compared with placebo administered controls. Results suggest that KIO3 is as effective a thyroid blocking agent as potassium iodide. In comparison to controls, 24-h thyroid uptake of 131I can be substantially reduced if potassium iodide or KIO3 is given to the animals within 2-4 h after exposure to 131I. Another noteworthy observation is that KIO3 is effective even at 8 h when administered at twice the usual dosage in comparison to the single dose, which does not show appreciable thyroid blocking properties after 8 h.

web link
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8225995?dopt=Abstract

..........

Willsorr75

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Re: Protecting animals now - doing what we can...petitions, etc.
« Reply #101 on: May 09, 2012, 06:33:42 AM »
Fantastic! Thanks Yowbarb. I'll definitely print this out today and added it to my emergency folder.
Stay informed, information is our first line of defense!
-Will

Yowbarb

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Re: Protecting animals now - doing what we can...petitions, etc.
« Reply #102 on: May 09, 2012, 10:26:28 AM »
Fantastic! Thanks Yowbarb. I'll definitely print this out today and added it to my emergency folder.

That's wonderful you are looking out for your little friends, in advance, when it is needed.  :)
Take Care,
Yowbarb

inselemel

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Re: Protecting animals now - doing what we can...petitions, etc.
« Reply #103 on: May 13, 2012, 10:04:17 AM »
If anyone is familiar with Sea Shepherd BREAKING NEWS: Via Scott West - "Captain Paul Watson was arrested today at Frankfurt airport on a warrant for his arrest for his intervention for the sharks campaign in 2005 in Costa Rica (in the documentary Sharkwater campaign). "

More details to come when head office issues the official press release.

This is so disgusting - Someone who defends the rights of those who cannot speak for themselves (the animals) has been arrested and may be deported to Costa Rica a country who is not only heavily involved in the shark decimation but also of the wholesale harvesting of endangered Turtle eggs (as the female turtles were still laying them) amongst other wildlife crimes.

OMG! I am quite literally fuming right now! >:( >:( >:(



Yowbarb

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Re: Protecting animals now - doing what we can...petitions, etc.
« Reply #104 on: May 13, 2012, 08:02:58 PM »
If anyone is familiar with Sea Shepherd BREAKING NEWS: Via Scott West - "Captain Paul Watson was arrested today at Frankfurt airport on a warrant for his arrest for his intervention for the sharks campaign in 2005 in Costa Rica (in the documentary Sharkwater campaign). "

More details to come when head office issues the official press release.

This is so disgusting - Someone who defends the rights of those who cannot speak for themselves (the animals) has been arrested and may be deported to Costa Rica a country who is not only heavily involved in the shark decimation but also of the wholesale harvesting of endangered Turtle eggs (as the female turtles were still laying them) amongst other wildlife crimes.

OMG! I am quite literally fuming right now! >:( >:( >:(

Do you know if he has proper legal representation if his rights are being violated. If the latter is true he could get help from Amnesty International.
All The Best,
Yowbarb

 

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