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Author Topic: Good dogs for a survival group  (Read 14020 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: Good dogs for a survival group
« Reply #30 on: June 08, 2015, 11:25:45 PM »
Have you taken a look at the Husky breed?

Hello and Welcome to the Planet X Town Hall.
I joined in on a discussion on FB about huskies but didn't post on here...
They seem like a really great breed. My only consideration might be weather. I am likely to end up in a climate with plenty of heat and humidity much of the year...Might that be too warm a climate for a husky?

Here are some links...

•   http://pets.thenest.com/dangers-outdoor-temperatures-husky-dogs-11916.html
•   http://www.yourpurebredpuppy.com/reviews/siberianhuskies.html
•   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siberian_Husky

I'm sure a husky would be high on many people's list especially if they had a survival community in northern latitudes.

PLS share what you know about huskies.  :)

- Yowbarb

WhiteHusky

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Re: Good dogs for a survival group
« Reply #31 on: June 09, 2015, 05:44:57 AM »
Hi Yowbarb,

 I've only had my purebred husky for 6 months which weighed in at 50 pounds yesterday. He's still a puppy, but a hardy breed from what I've seen with my own eyes and read. As for the heat you can build them up slowly to it. Just like a person that's not used to being outside in the heat, just takes baby steps. They have 2 coats, and when they are in hotter climates they will shed the bottom thicker coat. Mines actually started to blow that lower coat out seeing he is playing more and more outside. Like any dog, you have to have water for them, and shade time to time. The hunting instinct of this species is quite amazing.


enlightenme

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Re: Good dogs for a survival group
« Reply #32 on: January 01, 2016, 03:05:04 PM »
I have had a few pure breed dogs during my lifetime, but mostly I have raised labs, that weren't quite pure bred, usually with a little shepherd or whatnot mixed in.  My current dog is a yellow lab mix of some sort (I believe he is mixed with some shepherd or possibly even some type of larger breed, possibly even a Ridgeback because his hair stands up along his spine when in protecting mode and since he is very tall, and very, very fast).  We rescued him from a shelter at 18 mo old, still plenty of time to bond and raise properly.  I definitely feel as if he must have had some sort of special training, possibly even a police dog dropout who couldn't get past the fear of gunshots and loud noises like fireworks.  He actually assisted in the apprehension of a thief at a local business when the police were called and the thief was getting away, Duke stopped him by grabbing a hold of his ankles until he was handcuffed and taken away.  It was the local police who told us they thought he must have had some professional training for how he was able to apprehend the suspect.  Labs are great with children, very loyal, and if you have a bit of a shepherd in there you have got one excellent guard dog too!  Usually available at your local SPCA/shelter for only a small adoption fee too!
« Last Edit: January 01, 2016, 03:27:14 PM by enlightenme »

Yowbarb

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Re: Good dogs for a survival group
« Reply #33 on: January 09, 2016, 05:30:39 PM »
I have had a few pure breed dogs during my lifetime, but mostly I have raised labs, that weren't quite pure bred, usually with a little shepherd or whatnot mixed in.  My current dog is a yellow lab mix of some sort (I believe he is mixed with some shepherd or possibly even some type of larger breed, possibly even a Ridgeback because his hair stands up along his spine when in protecting mode and since he is very tall, and very, very fast).  We rescued him from a shelter at 18 mo old, still plenty of time to bond and raise properly.  I definitely feel as if he must have had some sort of special training, possibly even a police dog dropout who couldn't get past the fear of gunshots and loud noises like fireworks.  He actually assisted in the apprehension of a thief at a local business when the police were called and the thief was getting away, Duke stopped him by grabbing a hold of his ankles until he was handcuffed and taken away.  It was the local police who told us they thought he must have had some professional training for how he was able to apprehend the suspect.  Labs are great with children, very loyal, and if you have a bit of a shepherd in there you have got one excellent guard dog too!  Usually available at your local SPCA/shelter for only a small adoption fee too!

Oh, that's interesting! I never thought to ask if you had a dog. :) Does Duke have a protruding spine at all?
Seems very smart and independent?
:)
Do you have a cat, too?

enlightenme

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Re: Good dogs for a survival group
« Reply #34 on: January 09, 2016, 05:37:18 PM »
I have had a few pure breed dogs during my lifetime, but mostly I have raised labs, that weren't quite pure bred, usually with a little shepherd or whatnot mixed in.  My current dog is a yellow lab mix of some sort (I believe he is mixed with some shepherd or possibly even some type of larger breed, possibly even a Ridgeback because his hair stands up along his spine when in protecting mode and since he is very tall, and very, very fast).  We rescued him from a shelter at 18 mo old, still plenty of time to bond and raise properly.  I definitely feel as if he must have had some sort of special training, possibly even a police dog dropout who couldn't get past the fear of gunshots and loud noises like fireworks.  He actually assisted in the apprehension of a thief at a local business when the police were called and the thief was getting away, Duke stopped him by grabbing a hold of his ankles until he was handcuffed and taken away.  It was the local police who told us they thought he must have had some professional training for how he was able to apprehend the suspect.  Labs are great with children, very loyal, and if you have a bit of a shepherd in there you have got one excellent guard dog too!  Usually available at your local SPCA/shelter for only a small adoption fee too!

Oh, that's interesting! I never thought to ask if you had a dog. :) Does Duke have a protruding spine at all?
Seems very smart and independent?
:)
Do you have a cat, too?

Yes, one dog, one cat.  I inherited the kitten/cat (Tigger) with the children.  It's Aly's pet, but for the most part she just loves and plays with it, while her Uncle Nate takes care of feeding/watering and the litter box.  It's really cute how the two animals have taken to each other.  They are good buddies now and play together.  Considering Tigger was a kitten of only four months when he moved in and Duke (6 years old now already) had been an only child for awhile, I was pleasantly surprised and pleased that they learned to get along together so well.  I will have to learn how to get pics from my phone onto here to show you all.  He is very smart and pretty independent, other than a large fear of loud noises (fireworks, gunshots,etc).  When he is in watchdog mode, his hair stands up all along his back.  He is fiercely loyal and protective, especially of the kids.  Heaven help anyone who ever tried to come in here uninvited or make a move to hurt one of us!

Yowbarb

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Re: Good dogs for a survival group
« Reply #35 on: January 09, 2016, 09:17:46 PM »
I have had a few pure breed dogs during my lifetime, but mostly I have raised labs, that weren't quite pure bred, usually with a little shepherd or whatnot mixed in.  My current dog is a yellow lab mix of some sort (I believe he is mixed with some shepherd or possibly even some type of larger breed, possibly even a Ridgeback because his hair stands up along his spine when in protecting mode and since he is very tall, and very, very fast).  We rescued him from a shelter at 18 mo old, still plenty of time to bond and raise properly.  I definitely feel as if he must have had some sort of special training, possibly even a police dog dropout who couldn't get past the fear of gunshots and loud noises like fireworks.  He actually assisted in the apprehension of a thief at a local business when the police were called and the thief was getting away, Duke stopped him by grabbing a hold of his ankles until he was handcuffed and taken away.  It was the local police who told us they thought he must have had some professional training for how he was able to apprehend the suspect.  Labs are great with children, very loyal, and if you have a bit of a shepherd in there you have got one excellent guard dog too!  Usually available at your local SPCA/shelter for only a small adoption fee too!

Oh, that's interesting! I never thought to ask if you had a dog. :) Does Duke have a protruding spine at all?
Seems very smart and independent?
:)
Do you have a cat, too?

Yes, one dog, one cat.  I inherited the kitten/cat (Tigger) with the children.  It's Aly's pet, but for the most part she just loves and plays with it, while her Uncle Nate takes care of feeding/watering and the litter box.  It's really cute how the two animals have taken to each other.  They are good buddies now and play together.  Considering Tigger was a kitten of only four months when he moved in and Duke (6 years old now already) had been an only child for awhile, I was pleasantly surprised and pleased that they learned to get along together so well.  I will have to learn how to get pics from my phone onto here to show you all.  He is very smart and pretty independent, other than a large fear of loud noises (fireworks, gunshots,etc).  When he is in watchdog mode, his hair stands up all along his back.  He is fiercely loyal and protective, especially of the kids.  Heaven help anyone who ever tried to come in here uninvited or make a move to hurt one of us!

I got a kick out of reading about how the kitten and the big dog get along. :) Maybe Duke is part Ridgeback as you have been thinking.
He sounds like such a good dog, a real keeper!
We have a cat named Tigga. Tigga had a littermate named Tiggy but she got chased away or something; we tried so hard to find her. We can only hope someone is feeding her, just as we feed cats at our door. it took us awhile to figure it out but some old fellow in the neighborhood passed away and a conglomeration of cats ran down the street to an abandoned partly built house. Right behind our place. We couldn't figure out how a small group of them seemed to know one another but did not look like litter mates. We ended up feeding them for quite awhile and figured out they were not actually feral. Squeaky a young Bombay ended up PG. before we could catch and fix her. She had kittens  and we managed to trap all the kittens on our front porch with tuna. Then mama cat ran in too. Got them fixed, shots and all. Fairly well tamed, but not well enough to adopt out. Bombay mama not feral but kittens never completely tamed down.
More on all that... :) I am a certifiable cat woman...:) Pics, mama cat (black Bombay "Squeaky," Tigga Tiggy Foxie. Will post Nigel and Nirosha later...if I can find them... They are black Bombay-looking like mama. Beautiful!! We already had cats but kept mama and all 5 kittens. I am not so adept on phone pics, either. Daughter has to help me...
Half the time can't find my own pics...
« Last Edit: January 09, 2016, 10:28:10 PM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Good dogs for a survival group
« Reply #36 on: January 09, 2016, 10:17:03 PM »
PS Tigga and Tigga look a little lethargic in the pics. I think that was the first day they were all let out after getting fixed...
OK well this is mainly about good survival dogs. I'd say if the dog doesn't eat the kitten that helps. :)

ilinda

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Re: Good dogs for a survival group
« Reply #37 on: February 07, 2016, 01:53:17 PM »
Not sure how good the dog below would be in a survival situation, but s/he would try to help eat all the meat he could! 

Yowbarb

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Re: Good dogs for a survival group
« Reply #38 on: February 07, 2016, 10:40:05 PM »
That doggie would probably help people feel safer. :)

Yowbarb

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Re: Good dogs for a survival group
« Reply #39 on: May 03, 2018, 08:22:25 PM »
Miscelleneous "Security" note from happypreppers.com
 ;D

http://www.happypreppers.com/shelter.html

Give cues that "Cujo" lives here.

Make it look like you have a dog, even if you don't own one. Place
a big dog dish of water and a big chew toy to imply you have a
huge dog. Intruders may not want to battle a large and hungry
apocalypse dog! It may be just the incentive they need to go to
another home. As  mentioned above, display a "Guard dog on
Duty" sign (even if you don't have a dog).

NOTE: In times of famine a small dog may be considered
prey.

Socrates

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Beware the Malinois
« Reply #40 on: May 03, 2018, 10:01:07 PM »

Maybe a nice sign [this dog is not prey...].
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R.R. Book

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Re: Good dogs for a survival group
« Reply #41 on: May 04, 2018, 05:59:32 AM »
Nice doggie. :-X

« Last Edit: May 04, 2018, 07:00:09 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Good dogs for a survival group
« Reply #42 on: May 04, 2018, 09:19:44 PM »
Not only post signs of the dog that you don't have, but there are recordings of a dog barking that can be played periodically.  I remember those dog-barking-recordings  used to be sold, and it sounded so real. 

IIRC, the recording was played after a knock at the door or phone call or ??  Anyway, it would allow barking for several minutes, then stop, so as to sound more natural, as if there really were a dog there.

Socrates

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Re: recorded dog barking
« Reply #43 on: May 04, 2018, 11:00:15 PM »
there are recordings of a dog barking that can be played periodically.
3 problems with this option, as i see it:
- it has become pretty common; if someone doesn't actually see a dog or hear it scratching or jumping up against the door, i'm sure they'll test if there really is one
- maybe really expensive ones sound real; all the ones i've heard are clearly recordings
- the mindset/psyche of starving people is such that only the threat of serious injury will scare them off. In other words, they'll keep looking for a way in until a dog is literally after them. Maybe the dog will quiet down; maybe it can be appeased, distracted or locked away. If you're starving to death, the threat on your life better be pretty darn real.

You know, like coming face to face with a Malinois that's protective, fast, strong, fierce, relentless and can fly...  ;)

Man, these dogs are crazy. They're not like: if you force me, i will hurt you or if you come here, i will chase you away; Malinois are more like: dude, i'm bored. Please come over here so i can rip you to shreds. Make my day....
All ya have to do is look at the eyes of these dogs, either at 'rest' or attack. These dogs look like they don't even have an off button. They are always ready to go 100% at a moment's notice.
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R.R. Book

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Re: Good dogs for a survival group
« Reply #44 on: May 05, 2018, 05:33:46 AM »
Quote
and can fly

LOL!

 

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