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Author Topic: Baking Bread  (Read 17945 times)


steedy

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Re: Baking Bread
« Reply #16 on: May 08, 2014, 10:32:02 AM »
Thanks for the links.  Love a good loaf of Italian bread.  I'm very picky about it too, having had some real Italian cooking throughout my life.  Same with Amish cooking.  People can say it's an Amish recipe, but I know the real deal.

Yowbarb

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Re: Baking Bread
« Reply #17 on: May 08, 2014, 12:19:09 PM »
Topic: Raw - or baked - sprouted breads, such as "Essene" Bread
Started by Yowbarb October 12, 2011

Link:  https://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=3239.0

Recipe:
http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/essene-bread-sprouted-grain.aspx#axzz319Ul1ZuO

Yowbarb

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Re: Baking Bread
« Reply #18 on: May 12, 2014, 02:32:02 PM »
I used to have a wood cook stove but unfortunately hard times made me sell it.  Sure wish I had it now.
Endtimesgal, I have enjoyed your posts for so long now.
Hoping you will continue to post and share all that you have learned about prepping...
All The Best,
Barb Townsend

pbutter72

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Re: Baking Bread
« Reply #19 on: May 14, 2014, 08:00:01 PM »
pbutter, that looks so delicious! I love food like that.
That looks like it also has some black seeds on it... very healing, I think...
 :)

It really is good and filling! I like it with slices of avocado and tomato with a pinch of sea salt n pepper-  ;)

This is my friend's pic, so Im sure she added some other good things not mentioned in the recipe. She  is pretty awesome, she does a wide range of things, from reiki to wild plant/food foraging-- I learn alot from her :)

~pB
pbutter,  anyway that bread must be so good!
Sounds like you have some wonderful friendships.
 :)

Yes, Endtimesgal and Barb! I am thankful to have such a good group of folks around--- they do range in age, experiences, talents, and interests and I am grateful-- Kinda like this forum-- there is so much to learn from folk here as well!

~pB

Yowbarb

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Re: Baking Bread
« Reply #20 on: May 14, 2014, 08:47:36 PM »
pbutter - yes it is a good group here.
 :)

Socrates

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Dried Bread
« Reply #21 on: January 14, 2017, 06:24:14 AM »
Sorry, no links; this comes from memory;

Survival Bread
If you make yourself some proper bread, pull a string through it and hang it up to dry; dried and kept in an appropriate place, it will keep for a very long time.
When you are interested in eating it, wet it and then rebake in an oven for a short period.
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location, civilisation reboot, PERMACULTURE, postcataclysmic soil, Growing Soil 1.01

ilinda

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Re: Dried Bread
« Reply #22 on: January 14, 2017, 01:14:56 PM »
Sorry, no links; this comes from memory;

Survival Bread
If you make yourself some proper bread, pull a string through it and hang it up to dry; dried and kept in an appropriate place, it will keep for a very long time.
When you are interested in eating it, wet it and then rebake in an oven for a short period.
Some pastas such as spaghetti would be a good substitute for "bread", depending on the ingredients.  If the ingredient list has fat or egg, it wouln't have a very long shelf life, but if just wheat flour and water, it is the same ingredients I always use in flatbreads. 

In times of plenty I use either water, potato water, or whey for the liquid, and for the solid ingredients, I grind spelt berries or Kamut berries.  In sparse times I would use water as the liquid.

Socrates

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pasta and 'Vit. D'
« Reply #23 on: January 15, 2017, 08:02:12 AM »
(According to medicinal researcher Atom Bergstrom) pasta was traditionally dried in the Sun and this gave it Vit. D
At some point it seems there were governmental forces that didn't like people drying their pasta out in the Sun and the tradition was abandoned; this was followed by a significant increase in symptoms caused by Vit. D deficiency.

A few things on Vit. D:
Vit. D is a hormone precursor and not a 'vitamin'; it is essential for many biological processes.
Vit. D is created on the skin in sunlight but it can also be washed off of the skin.
It can be created by leaving foods out in the Sun; consuming said foods offers Vit. D
In more Northern/Southern [depending on what hemisphere you're at] regions the power of the Sun is reduced so the skin no longer produces Vit. D no matter how many hours one is exposed to sunlight.
I know that where i am at, i.e. North-Western Europe, from September to May the Sun does not have enough power to create Vit. D on the skin. In other words, even if you were to walk around outside naked all day, your body would still not be producing any Vit. D; that's ironic when one considers that even 10 minutes of sunbatheing during summer offers enough Vit. D to last you through the whole day.
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ilinda

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Re: pasta and 'Vit. D'
« Reply #24 on: January 18, 2017, 03:16:16 PM »
(According to medicinal researcher Atom Bergstrom) pasta was traditionally dried in the Sun and this gave it Vit. D
At some point it seems there were governmental forces that didn't like people drying their pasta out in the Sun and the tradition was abandoned; this was followed by a significant increase in symptoms caused by Vit. D deficiency.

A few things on Vit. D:
Vit. D is a hormone precursor and not a 'vitamin'; it is essential for many biological processes.
Vit. D is created on the skin in sunlight but it can also be washed off of the skin.
It can be created by leaving foods out in the Sun; consuming said foods offers Vit. D
In more Northern/Southern [depending on what hemisphere you're at] regions the power of the Sun is reduced so the skin no longer produces Vit. D no matter how many hours one is exposed to sunlight.
I know that where i am at, i.e. North-Western Europe, from September to May the Sun does not have enough power to create Vit. D on the skin. In other words, even if you were to walk around outside naked all day, your body would still not be producing any Vit. D; that's ironic when one considers that even 10 minutes of sunbatheing during summer offers enough Vit. D to last you through the whole day.
Sun-dried mushrooms are another good source of vitamin D.

Dr. Mercola has on his site an article or two about the amount of vitamin D3 that can be obtained by the sun at different latitudes, at different times of the year, and one of his references showed that even when the sun is about 15 degrees above the horizon, there can be some vitamin D production in the body exposed to the sun.  I'll try to find that article and post it or its link.

Yowbarb

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Re: Baking Bread
« Reply #25 on: April 05, 2020, 08:07:31 PM »
Quote
Socrates, ilinda thanks for the great posts, hadn't seen these.

So here is a simple way to make good, normal probably-not-so-terribly-nutritious white bread. Could be done with whole wheat flour too. In the past I advised people stock up on cheap dry goods like flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt, leavening agent, etc. Oil also, and if possible some canned butter.
In a survival situation it would be good to be able to crank out many loaves of easy to bake bread to go along with soups, stews, MREs whatever...  Bread is a comfort food and sometimes good to have some strong coffee, fresh bread and soup or something to start out an early morning...

Here is the video. The amount of actual prep time is negligible. There is some waiting time but  that is not a big deal and could be done along with other tasks in a busy survival kitchen. Note: It does require parchment paper and a tool called a scraper.

Faster No Knead Bread - So Easy ANYONE can make (but NO BOILING WATER!!)
 7:17  10,516,946 views


https://youtu.be/I0t8ZAhb8lQ

« Last Edit: April 05, 2020, 09:01:26 PM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Baking Bread
« Reply #26 on: April 05, 2020, 08:12:28 PM »
Quote
Barb note: BTW, as you probably know, don't use waxed paper for baking... the wax in the paper can melt and even ignite.
I looked into it. on the other hand, parchment paper is made for the hot oven. It does have silicone in it, is considered generally safe for humans.

I feel, considering the low probability of risk and the huge amount of cleanup which can be eliminated... I say use it... I like to bake fish and no matter what I do it is really hard to clean the pans so I will be wrapping the fish in parchment paper or putting it on the bottom of the pans. Also holiday baking especially the Russian teacakes, seems like a good idea.
...


Parchment paper is grease- and moisture-resistant paper specially treated for oven use. It is very versatile—use it to line cake molds and baking sheets, to wrap fish and other dishes that are cooked en papillote, and to cover countertops during messy tasks to make cleanup easy.Sep 5, 2019

What's the Difference Between Parchment Paper and Wax ...www.marthastewart.com › Food & Cooking

https://www.marthastewart.com/269281/parchment-vs-wax-paper
...
Parchment paper is safe to use for baking and cooking. The silicone contained in parchment paper makes the paper oil resistance, moist, and heat resistant. Besides, you can use this parchment paper repeatedly. By using parchment, you no longer need to oil the pan when baking cookies.Jan 1, 2020

Is Parchment Paper Safe: In Oven, Cooking, Toxicity & Burningwww.kitchenfeeds.com › is-parchment-paper-safe

Is parchment paper BPA free?
Good alternatives to plastic wrap are unbleached deli/bakery sheets, waxed paper and parchment paper. ... Plastic bottles labeled “BPA-free” are now found everywhere, but they are often using BPS, a chemical that has similar health concerns.

Storing Food and Packaging | Helping to Healwww.helping2heal.org › healthy-food › storing-food-and-packaging
...
Silicone bakeware is heat-resistant and safe for the oven and freezer. It doesn't change flavours or release odours that might affect food quality. ... One safety tip: Use food-grade silicone products at recommended temperatures — not above 220 C (428 F).

How to choose eco-friendly cookware - David Suzuki ...davidsuzuki.org › queen-of-green › choose-eco-friendly-cookware

Silicone bakeware is heat-resistant and safe for the oven and freezer. It doesn't change flavours or release odours that might affect food quality. ... One safety tip: Use food-grade silicone products at recommended temperatures — not above 220 C (428 F).
- wellness mama

Is silicone cookware toxic?

Is silicone toxic when heated?
While not a “100% natural” material like rubber, food-grade silicone is a non-toxic polymer mostly made from silica (sand). It can withstand heating and freezing without leaching or off-gassing, hazardous chemicals – unlike plastics, which contaminate food in these environments.Jun 18, 2015
[/quote

« Last Edit: April 05, 2020, 08:53:54 PM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Baking Bread
« Reply #27 on: April 05, 2020, 09:05:03 PM »
https://www.tastecooking.com/making-old-bread-new/

Food historians trace bread pudding back to Europe in the early 11th and 12th centuries, and it has been popular in England since the 13th century, when just about every kitchen had a deep bowl called a pudding basin that was used to collect scraps of stale bread.

read pudding is an old dish with humble roots. It evolved out of necessity, as a means of using up leftover, stale bread at a time when food was scarce. If the last heel of bread in the house was too stiff to chew, you could always add a bit of warm liquid and sugar to it and make it new again.

Food historians trace bread pudding back to Europe in the early 11th and 12th centuries, and it has been popular in England since the 13th century, when just about every kitchen had a deep bowl called a pudding basin that was used to collect scraps of stale bread. Bread pudding of that era was not nearly as luxurious as the kind we know today. Rather than the custardy mix of cream and eggs, stale bread was often soaked in hot water and squeezed dry before being mixed with sugar and spices. Early settlers brought pudding to America, but because wheat was not readily available, they often thickened the mixture with cornmeal instead of bread.

Plenty of countries have their own take on bread pudding. In Mexico, there’s capirotada, a bread pudding layered with cheese and soaked in a syrup made with piloncillo, a type of brown sugar. Egypt has Om Ali, a pudding made from puff pastry, milk or cream, raisins, and almonds. There’s Eish es Serny, a Middle Eastern dessert made from dried bread (rusks), simmered in sugar and honey syrup, flavored with rosewater and colored with caramel. And in India, there is shahi tukda, a dish made from bread, ghee, saffron, sugar, rosewater, and almonds.

Yowbarb

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Re: Baking Bread
« Reply #28 on: April 05, 2020, 09:27:02 PM »
Quote
Barb Note: This bread pudding looks just like my Mom used to make.
...

https://theenglishkitchen.blogspot.com/

https://theenglishkitchen.blogspot.com/2014/12/old-time-bread-pudding.html

https://sites.google.com/site/oakcottagerecipes/bread-pudding-1

Bread Pudding
*A Traditional Bread Pudding*

Makes one 12 by 9 inch pan

This is very different than bread and butter pudding.  Don't confuse the two.  This is a very traditional and stodgily delicious blend of dried fruit, spices, bread, eggs and milk. Perfect for a winters day tucked up in side in the warmth and best served with custard or cream.  It's also very good served cold and simply cut into squares.

400g of white bread, torn into pieces (about 7 cups)
600ml of milk (2 1/2 cups)
450g of dried fruit (3 cups)
(Use a mixture of raisins, sultanas and currants
100g sugar (1/2 cup)
50g of self raising flour (1/4 cup plus 2 TBS)
1 1/2 TBS mixed spice (see my right hand side bar for a recipe to make your own)
2 large free range eggs, beaten
100g of butter, melted (7 TBS)
demerara sugar to sprinkle on top (turbinado)

Preheat the oven to 150*C/300*F.  Butter a rectangular pan about 12 by 9 inches well.  Set aside.

Put the bread into a large bowl.  Pour the milk over top and allow it to stand for 10 minutes.   At the end of that time, beat it all together with a wooden spoon.  Stir in the dried fruit and sugar.  Mix well together.  Stir in the flour and mixed spice.   Add the beaten eggs and the melted butter.  Pour into the prepared pan.   Sprinkle demerara sugar on top evenly. Bake for one and a half hours.  Raise the oven temperature to 180*C.350*F. and bake for a further 10 minutes or so until the pudding is golden.   Excellent served warm with custard or cream, or eaten cold.

R.R. Book

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Re: Baking Bread
« Reply #29 on: April 06, 2020, 03:39:44 PM »
Yum!  It reminds me a little bit of one of the Christmas puddings by the Townsends, the Youtube channel that Soc recommended for their primitive Colonial cooking and other skills.

 

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