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Author Topic: The Arab Spring: Hope for democracy in the Middle East?  (Read 16260 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: The Arab Spring: Hope for democracy in the Middle East?
« Reply #45 on: December 31, 2012, 12:06:44 PM »
This article and photo are from The Guardian, UK,
Yowbarb
...
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/dec/26/syria-military-police-chief-defects

Syria military police chief defects to rebels

Major General Abdelaziz Jassim al-Shalal says army has 'committed massacres against an unarmed population'

Peter Beaumont
guardian.co.uk, Wednesday 26 December 2012 08.44 EST

.........

Yowbarb

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Re: The Arab Spring: Hope for democracy in the Middle East?
« Reply #46 on: December 31, 2012, 12:08:00 PM »
These guys defecting to the Rebels look scared to death.
Let's hope someone helps them get out the door alive...

Yowbarb

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Re: The Arab Spring: Hope for democracy in the Middle East?
« Reply #47 on: April 23, 2013, 11:43:25 AM »
http://us.cnn.com/2013/04/15/world/meast/saudi-prince-women-driving/index.html?iid=article_sidebar

Royal support for Saudi women drivers

updated 9:12 PM EDT, Mon April 15, 2013
 
Billionaire Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal has tweeted support for giving women the right to drive in Saudi Arabia

Photo: Saudi prince Alwaleed bin Talal speaks during a press conference, on September 13, 2011, in Riyadh.


Yowbarb

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Re: The Arab Spring: Hope for democracy in the Middle East?
« Reply #48 on: May 10, 2013, 12:23:57 PM »
These are countries in the region of the Middle East which are listed on the Social Progress Index.
The Index and the Imperative which is the basis, is apparently a potentially effective way of moving forward, funded by companies in the UK Europe and America.- Yowbarb

Middle East/North Africa

Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Morocco, Tunisia, Turkey and the United Arab Emirates

The Social Progress Imperative

http://social-progress.org/countries-in-the-social-progress-index/


The Imperative

Numerous studies have found a high correlation between economic growth and a wide variety of social indicators, yet there is growing awareness that economic measures alone do not fully capture social progress.

The Social Progress Imperative’s mission is to advance global human wellbeing, by combining national social performance and capacity indicators with solutions-oriented outreach to sector leaders, and grassroots champions, who together can effect large-scale change. Social progress is defined as the capacity of a society to meet the basic human needs of its citizens, establish the building blocks that allow citizens and communities to enhance and sustain the quality of their lives, and create the conditions for all individuals to reach their full potential.

The first major effort of the Social Progress Imperative is the Social Progress Index, launched April 11, 2013 at the Skoll World Forum in Oxford, UK.The Social Progress Index is a tool that we hope will be widely used to inform and influence policies and institutions around the world. The Index is founded on the principle that what we measure guides the choices we make. By measuring the things that really matter to people — their basic needs, their food, shelter and security; their access to healthcare, education, and a healthy environment; their opportunity to improve their live — the Social Progress Index is an attempt to reshape the debate about development.

We are also building a Social Progress Network of organizations that share our desire to find better ways to solve the world’s problems, who will use the Index to analyze their countries’ development challenges, help us make the model even better, and share lessons about what works. This network of partners from research and academic institutions, think tanks, for-profit and non-profit private organizations, and international development organizations in our sample of countries will facilitate feedback, local research, learning, and action. Partners will also help to identify the policies, institutions, legal frameworks and financing mechanisms that can drive more effective and efficient social progress, through international benchmarking and fostering specific research projects among the network of partners. The idea of building capacity in-country and empowering a local network to drive the change process locally is fundamental to the Social Progress Imperative. We want the Social Progress Network in each country to become a driver for change in their country.
[Continues ]  http://www.socialprogressimperative.org/about/the-imperative

Yowbarb

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Yowbarb

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Re: The Arab Spring: Hope for democracy in the Middle East?
« Reply #50 on: May 23, 2013, 12:36:01 PM »
http://www.cnn.com/video/data/2.0/video/world/2013/05/14/nr-wedeman-syrian-refugees-limbo.cnn.html

Syrian refugees stuck in limbo
CNN Newsroom|Added on May 14, 2013
Ben Wedeman reports from Turkey on the growing fears of Syrian refugees.

Yowbarb

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Re: The Arab Spring: Hope for democracy in the Middle East?
« Reply #51 on: August 21, 2013, 07:29:23 AM »
It's not looking so good, IMHO for the "Arab Spring" in the Middle East. First there was the very worst attack on citizens recently - gas attack on Libyan citizens. Also escalating violence by both pro-Moslem Brotherhood forces AND the Egyptian military. Both situations have been condemned by the President of the United States and the UN Secretary General.
- Yowbarb
... http://www.un.org/News/Press/docs/2013/sgsm15221.doc.htm

SECRETARY-GENERAL, ALARMED BY VIOLENCE IN EGYPT, STRONGLY CONDEMNS ATTACKS
 
ON CHURCHES, HOSPITALS, OTHER PUBLIC FACILITIES AS ‘UNACCEPTABLE’

The following statement was issued today by the Spokesperson for UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon:

The Secretary-General is alarmed by ongoing developments in Egypt and the widespread outbreak of violent protests and excessive use of force in handling them.  He strongly condemns attacks on churches, hospitals and other public facilities, which he finds unacceptable.  Whatever the grievances, there is no justification for destruction of infrastructure and property so important to Egypt’s future.  The Secretary-General believes that preventing further loss of life should be the Egyptians’ highest priority at this dangerous moment.  He urges those in the street and those in authority to use maximum restraint and shift immediately to de-escalation.  He appeals to the authorities and to the political leaders to adopt a credible plan to contain the violence and revive the political process hijacked by violence.  Time is of the essence.

The Secretary-General has noted already that political clocks move only forward, not backwards.  He calls on all Egyptians to resolve their differences peacefully in the interest of moving forward.  With such sharp polarization in Egyptian society, both the authorities and the political leaders share the responsibility for ending the current violence.

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________________________________________

Yowbarb

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Re: The Arab Spring: Hope for democracy in the Middle East?
« Reply #52 on: September 15, 2013, 11:14:04 PM »
http://religion.blogs.cnn.com/2013/09/04/iranian-presidents-surprising-message-to-jews/?iref=obnetwork

Sept 4th 2013 04:47 PM ET

Iranian president's surprising message to Jews

By Daniel Burke and Mitra Mobasherat, CNN

(CNN) - Marking a sharp shift from his Holocaust-denying predecessor, new Iranian President Hassan Rouhani on Wednesday appeared to wish "all Jews" a "blessed Rosh Hashanah" on his English-language Twitter account

Rosh Hashanah, of course, is the Jewish celebration of the new year. As Rouhani mentions, it began Wednesday at sundown. The image in the tweet is reportedly taken from a synagogue in Tehran.

Rouhani, a Shiite Muslim cleric, was elected president in June. He is widely seen as more moderate than former president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, though his goodwill gesture on Wednesday stunned even veteran Iran watchers.

“Not even under the monarchy do we remember such a message,” Haleh Esfandiari, a native Iranian and director of the Middle East program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center, told Al-Monitor.

On Thursday, however, Mohammadreza Sadegh, an adviser to Rouhani, told Iran's Fars News Agency that the Rosh Hashanah tweet did not come from the Iranian president. The tweet came from former campaign aides, rather, who run the Twitter account, Sadegh said.

"All the news regarding the president, after his election, is reflected by his appointed bureau chief and those are the only official reports. Mr. Rouhani does not have a Twitter account," Sadegh told Fars.

A close aide to Rouhani, however, told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour that while the president does not tweet from his account, people in his office do, so it is semi-official.

Interest in Rouhani's Twitter account was nearly eclipsed on Thursday by extraordinary Tweets from the official account of Javad Zarif, Iran's foreign minister.

Yowbarb

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Re: The Arab Spring: Hope for democracy in the Middle East?
« Reply #53 on: October 18, 2013, 02:45:52 PM »
I feel this is related to the Arab Spring. Anyway it is a story which may inspire some hope.
- Yowbarb
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http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/18/world/europe/uk-queen-malala-yousafzai/index.html?hpt=wo_c1

Pakistan's Malala Yousafzai meets with Queen Elizabeth at palace
 
By Laura Smith-Spark, CNN
updated 1:22 PM EDT, Fri October 18, 2013

London (CNN) -- Pakistani girls' education campaigner Malala Yousafzai, who has found international fame since being shot by Taliban militants last year, met with another icon Friday: Britain's Queen Elizabeth II.

The Queen and her husband, Prince Philip, invited the young activist to a reception at Buckingham Palace, where they met and chatted for a short time.

Malala, who was accompanied by her father, Ziauddin Yousafzai, presented the Queen with a copy of her newly published memoir, titled "I am Malala."

"It's nice to meet you and it's a great honor coming here, and I wanted to present you my book," Malala said.

Queen Elizabeth responded, "That's very kind of you. Thank you very much indeed."

Malala said she hoped the two could work together to make sure all children receive an education, not just in Pakistan, but in the United Kingdom, too.
"I hope that we will all work together for the education of every child, and especially in this country as well, because I have heard about many children that cannot go to school," she said. "So I hope that we will continue our work on youth empowerment."

In his inimitable fashion, the Queen's husband, Prince Philip, made a joke about children and education when meeting Malala at the palace.

"It's one thing about children going to school," he said, "they go to school because their parents don't want them in the house."

In an interview with CNN last week, Malala joked that she was going "because it's the order of the Queen, it's the command."

Malala has been based in Britain since she was rushed there for major surgery after the Taliban shot her in the head in her native Pakistan because of her efforts to promote girls' education.

Malala: Accolades, applause and a grim milestone

It's been a busy few days for the 16-year-old.

Last Friday, as the world marked the International Day of the Girl, she met U.S. President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama at the White House.

Pakistan's educational challenges

Undaunted by the occasion, she challenged the President over U.S. drone strikes in her homeland, saying that they risk "fueling terrorism" and that U.S. efforts would be better focused on promoting education, according to a statement she released. The U.S. government has said strikes by the unmanned aircraft are a necessary part of the fight against militant groups, including the Taliban.

A day earlier, Malala won the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought, awarded by the European Parliament.

Parliament President Martin Schulz called her a "brave advocate for education" who "reminds us of our duty toward children and especially girls."

Malala's memoir, which recounts her experiences after she was shot and her determination not to be intimidated by extremists, was released October 8.

There had been speculation that she might also be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize last Friday, but it went instead to the world's chemical weapons watchdog.

Why Malala's bravery inspires us

Malala's activism started after the Taliban banned girls from schools in Pakistan's Swat Valley in 2009. She anonymously blogged for the BBC in opposition to that order and became an open advocate for girls' education.

In 2011, Malala told CNN, "I have the right of education. I have the right to play. I have the right to sing. I have the right to talk."

A year later, at age 15, she was riding the bus home from school when a Taliban gunman climbed aboard and shot her in the head. She nearly died.

Since then, Malala has recovered and continued advocating for girls' education, despite ongoing death threats from the Taliban.
 
CNN's Max Foster contributed to this report.

Yowbarb

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Re: The Arab Spring: Hope for democracy in the Middle East?
« Reply #54 on: December 10, 2013, 11:39:42 PM »
Yowbarb Note: This is usually a good sign when protestors are released. The women were pro-Morsi supporters and had faced terrorism charges, etc.
...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-25283054

Women pro-Morsi protesters freed in Egypt 7 December 2013 Last updated at 21:47 GMT

Fourteen women jailed in Egypt over a protest in support of ousted President Mohammed Morsi have been freed after an appeal court ruling.

Seven juveniles jailed over the protest last month in Alexandria have also been released, on three months' probation.

The women's 11-year sentence was cut to one year, suspended.

Human rights groups had attacked the convictions - on charges of belonging to a terrorist group, obstructing traffic, sabotage and using force.

Orla Guerin reports.  Continues" http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-25280469

Yowbarb

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Re: The Arab Spring: Hope for democracy in the Middle East?
« Reply #55 on: May 01, 2015, 10:31:04 PM »
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-32530324

Pakistan court jails 10 for Malala Yousafzai attack

BBC News‎ - 1 day ago
30 April 2015
From the section Asia

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