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Author Topic: Food  (Read 7816 times)

ilinda

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Re: Food
« Reply #15 on: April 26, 2018, 06:39:31 PM »
From http://community.wddty.com/blogs/health_from_your_garden/archive/2010/12/09/Olive-days-of-yore.aspx

[start quote]
Olive days of yore

I have just finished hand-harvesting our olives and those of our friends - some 800 kilos in all were gathered up. It was four long days of satisfying exercise on sunny wintery days for four 60- and 70-year-olds. There were no motorized tree shakers to reduce our labours, and no help from the sons of our Spanish friends.

Lunch was cooked over a wood fire with an exchange of views about what has been lost in traditional ways and farming in the past ten years.  We were surrounded by abandoned olive, almond, and orange groves. Ten years ago we would have been surrounded by large family groups, with grandparents, parents and children enjoying and benefiting from the exercise, the sense of community and the health-giving qualities of the extra virgin, cold-pressed olive oil produced on the village or family olive mill and press. Most presses have now disappeared and those villagers that do still harvest olives have to travel to large factory mills up to 50 kilometres away where their olives are mixed with those of others. Luckily, our friends have invested in a small home mill and press so our own olives are producing olive oil as pure as you can get.

Our olive trees have been fertilized only with sheep manure and sprayed against insects and fungi with natural ecological sprays.  We don’t use chemical products as do most commercial olive farms.

Perhaps we spend a full day a week growing and processing our ecological products, but we don’t need to visit supermarkets and we spend less money. One thing not on our shopping list is the typical medications for the over-50s.

© Clodagh and Richard Handscombe
Holistic gardeners and authors living in Spain for 25 years. Details of their books etc will be found on
www.gardeninginspain.com. December 2010.
Published 09 December 2010 12:01 by Bryan Hubbard
Comments
     
Antoine said:

Since olive leaves are known to kill micro-organisms, you might considder the use of olive leave tea... Just a thought
[end quote]
What an interesting article, Jim, that I'm just now finding.  Thanks for posting this!

R.R. Book

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Re: Food
« Reply #16 on: April 27, 2018, 04:40:48 AM »
That was lovely.  It reminds me of cider season here, as there are still a couple of presses located on Amish farms that the community gathers to use for a small fee. 

ilinda

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Re: Food
« Reply #17 on: April 27, 2018, 06:30:42 PM »
That was lovely.  It reminds me of cider season here, as there are still a couple of presses located on Amish farms that the community gathers to use for a small fee.
That is really cool!  Do you know where they keep their presses in off-season?  Indoors?  Do you know how they clean them, after pressing season is over?  Do you know what they charge?

IIRC, some magazine, maybe ACRES, U.S.A., had an article on growing olives in the U.S., and the writer stated that some very small olive farms/operations will use a fruit press for the olives, as it's more cost effective than a huge press as large growers use. 

R.R. Book

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Re: Food
« Reply #18 on: April 27, 2018, 06:51:21 PM »
The presses are large and kept in a barn.  The most modern one, powered by gas, has a conveyor belt with a pre-rinse for the apples, then the pressing, then bottling.  If you use your own jugs, it's a lot cheaper; otherwise theirs are around $1 each.  There is also a farm with a rickety old wooden cider press, which I believe has recently been decommissioned.  I've never stayed to watch the cleaning being done, but do know that they save the leftover pomace for livestock, so it's a win-win for the farmer.

Here's a small manual press from Lehman's:
https://www.lehmans.com/product/stainless-steel-cheese-and-fruit-press/


 

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