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Author Topic: Sacred Plant and Earth Medicine  (Read 4404 times)

chaunska

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Sacred Plant and Earth Medicine
« on: January 22, 2012, 08:35:58 PM »
There are many very old cures and treatments for common ailments and disease.   Plant and mineral identification is very important for proper cures.    Storage and preparation is another important aspect of this Medicine.   Listening to the "Plant People" is sometimes how we know what to use.   Herbivors have no problem with this sense and we humans need to relearn it.   

npe1pas

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Re: Sacred Plant and Earth Medicine
« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2012, 11:55:47 AM »
Very good advise.  My partner has been collecting knowledge for a number of years. She gets this knowledge from both printed matter and from the plants themselves.  She has been collecting a variety of medicinal plants and saving seeds (when the plant lends itself to propagation in this manner) from what she can.

A plant identification guide for the local flora is a good way to gain some info when you don't have access to a teacher.  There are a number of guide books available for uses of the different plants. Here is a sample of a book for the Eastern US. http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/1879181967/ref=sr_1_1?p=S00W&keywords=cherokee+plant+medicine&ie=UTF8&qid=1327348374.

pilamaya

chaunska

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Re: Sacred Plant and Earth Medicine
« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2012, 01:55:16 PM »
Tanyan yahi Npe1pas,  (welcome)

I have seen that book, it is very good.    It is also good that she is listening to the plants.   She should continue to practice in the field.   Get the feel for the uses of each plant.   Collect it up and tape it to a piece of paper and write down the uses the plant is telling you on the paper.    Then go look up to see if you were correct in the interpertation of what the plant was telling you.    Since they don't use language, interpertation is our part and we must test ourselves to make sure we are understanding correctly. 

Inaruti

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Re: Sacred Plant and Earth Medicine
« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2020, 07:20:36 PM »
Here is a great article about Chaga mushroom and some it's medicinal uses within the Native/First Nation communities in North America as well as Indigenous Peoples throughout the Northern Hemisphere:

First Nations Use of Chaga Mushroom

Chaga Mushroom, Inonotus Obliquus is a living sterile conk that grows on birch and other trees in the temperate forests throughout the Northern hemisphere.  It can live up to twenty years on the host tree until the tree eventually topples over and dies; both the chaga and the host live and die together.  Once dead the chaga fungus will then have the opportunity to produce fruiting bodies for up to six years.  A mysterious process to say the least and the fruiting body is considered the holy grail of mycology as it can be even more elusive than the chaga conk itself.

Chaga has been used by many cultures all around the world for centuries and used for prevention and cures for many types of diseases.  Widely used in Russia, Poland and other Baltic country’s as folk medicine for gastric problems, cancer, tuberculosis and heart and liver issues.

Khanty People use of Chaga MushroomChaga has been used in Russia as far back as the 16th Century for various cancers, especially tumors associated with angiogenesis (buildup of blood vessels that feed cancerous growths).  In Siberia, chaga has been widely known to help treat tuberculosis, liver conditions and stomach problems including gastritis and ulcers.  The Khanty people of Western Siberia put the chaga into fire and put the smoldering conk into hot water for use to clean and purify women's genital region after menstruation and birthing.
Also used in Canadian aboriginal culture First Nations people have been using Chaga for Centuries as well.  Cree healers call chaga Poashkan or Wiskakecakomikih.  Wisakecak is a mythological being who threw a scab mistaken for a piece of dried meat against a birch tree and tried to ingest it.  Chaga produces a sweet smelling incense and is often used in smoking pipe ceremony.   Used by the Cree and other native nations as a form of Moxibustion treatment to stimulate the body’s energy meridians.

Chipewyan First Nations Chipewyan and Ojibway Nations name for chaga is Cha’a’ihtthi.  They too used chaga simmering it for hours to make tea to treat viral related conditions.

The Denesuliné peoples of Northern Saskatchewan used two long lines of powdered chaga to represent two related events.  Once both lines were lit at opposite sides, whichever side completed burning first would signify which event would become true.  This is known to the Dene people as ETSEN DEK “it smells when it’s burning.”Alaskan Native peopleThe Gitksan of British Columbia know chaga as DIDIHUXW OR DI DIYHUH.  Also known by Gitksan elders as MLL’HLW AND TLLUXW.  Using chaga’s black coals to relieve rheumatic pain.  ‘Take a sliver of the black coal from the crack of the birch tree and burn it for pain in joint.’  The Wet’suwet’en of Northwestern British Columbia uses chaga for similar purposes calling chaga by two different names DIDIC’AH CI’ISTS’O AND TL’EYHTSE. 

The Tenaina of South – Central Alaska used chaga to help with toothaches.


source:https://www.annandachaga.com/pages/first-nations-use-of-chaga-mushroom
'Perceive that which cannot be seen with the eye.' -Miyamoto Musashi

ilinda

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Re: Sacred Plant and Earth Medicine
« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2020, 07:43:01 PM »
Quote
Fascinating that so many different peoples have used/do use this extremely versatile mushroom for so many varying reasons.  So I looked it up in Medicinal Mushrooms by Christopher Hobbs, and he devotes an entire chapter to Chaga (Inonotus obliquus).

Inaruti

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Re: Sacred Plant and Earth Medicine
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2020, 06:29:25 PM »
Quote
Fascinating that so many different peoples have used/do use this extremely versatile mushroom for so many varying reasons.  So I looked it up in Medicinal Mushrooms by Christopher Hobbs, and he devotes an entire chapter to Chaga (Inonotus obliquus).

Yes! Medicinal mushrooms are awesome! They are said to carry ancient memory within them :D

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Inaruti
'Perceive that which cannot be seen with the eye.' -Miyamoto Musashi

Inaruti

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Re: Sacred Plant and Earth Medicine
« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2020, 06:43:58 PM »
Echinacea: A Native American Cure-All

Echinacea is native to North America and was used by Native Americans for its range of medicinal benefits. Archaeological digs have found evidence of echinacea use by the Lakota Sioux dating back to the 17th century. The Sioux were said to use it to treat syphilis. Other tribes known to have used echinacea include the Choctaw, Pawnee, and Cheyenne. It first became known to European arrivals at around the start of the 1800s.

The Europeans acquired their knowledge from the Native Americans (particularly those who lived in the Great Plains) who had amassed considerable knowledge of medicinal herbs. Among the Native Americans, echinacea may have been the most widely used medicinal plant of all in that it was used to treat more maladies than any other plant.

The earliest mention of echinacea among Europeans in the US come from an English botanist named John Clayton who lived between 1693 and 1773. Clayton was a longtime resident of Virginia who mentioned the herb as a treatment for saddle sores on horses.

Echinacea belongs to the Asteraceae family, which includes daisies as well as edible herbs like dandelion and arnica. It does not have many common English names but one of the few is the purple coneflower. In recent years there has been a renewed interest in the herb due to purported benefits for the immune system. Echinacea is viewed as one of the herbal supplements that show the most promise as far as its positive immune system effects are concerned.

The Eclectic Medicine movement among doctors in the mid-19th-century medicine involved a strong focus on using botany to treat ailments. It was these doctors who made echinacea one of the main elements in herbal medicine. They used it to treat a range of illnesses and health conditions including snakebite, meningitis and tuberculosis.

These days, the echinacea plant is a favorite of gardeners, not just for its potential medicinal value but for its attractive flowers as well.

Echinacea flavor profile
Echinacea has an earthy taste accompanied by a tingling sensation. The tingling effect is caused by compounds it contains called alkamides.

Health benefits of echinacea
Echinacea’s health benefits come from the fact that it contains flavonoids and other antioxidants. The alkamides it contains boost the antioxidant activity.

Echinacea may be effective for treating health issues like:

Respiratory ailments: Echinacea has long been used to treat coughs, sore throats and similar problems. These respiratory issues are often symptoms of colds or flu. There is some evidence that echinacea can shorten the duration of colds and the flu.

Infections: Echinacea may reduce incidents of recurring infections such as malaria and vaginal yeast infections. This effect may result from its ability to boost the immune system.

Pain: Echinacea may be useful as a pain reliever. Native Americans used it as an analgesic.

Anxiety: Some of the compounds in echinacea may be beneficial for individuals suffering from anxiety.

Colds: The most common use of echinacea today is to shorten the duration of colds. Studies suggest that using echinacea can shorten a cold by up to four days.

Common uses
The most common way to use echinacea is to make an infusion with the leaves, roots, or petals by steeping it in hot water for about 20 minutes. Strain and drink. There are also commercial echinacea extracts available.


source:https://www.spiceography.com/echinacea/
'Perceive that which cannot be seen with the eye.' -Miyamoto Musashi

R.R. Book

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Re: Sacred Plant and Earth Medicine
« Reply #7 on: April 01, 2020, 05:15:06 AM »
What an amazing tidbit of information, about the mushrooms carrying ancient memory within them!

R.R. Book

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Re: Sacred Plant and Earth Medicine
« Reply #8 on: April 02, 2020, 08:57:38 AM »
I once knew a Cherokee woman who told me that echinacea ideally should be taken in late summer/ early autumn only, in preparation for the coming winter flu season.  She said that if taken at other times of the year, the body becomes accustomed to it and the effect might wear off.

Had never heard or read that before, but she seemed very certain about it.

Yowbarb

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Re: Sacred Plant and Earth Medicine
« Reply #9 on: April 03, 2020, 01:16:28 PM »
Quote
Fascinating that so many different peoples have used/do use this extremely versatile mushroom for so many varying reasons.  So I looked it up in Medicinal Mushrooms by Christopher Hobbs, and he devotes an entire chapter to Chaga (Inonotus obliquus).

Yes! Medicinal mushrooms are awesome! They are said to carry ancient memory within them :D

1
Inaruti

Inaruti, you had mentioned Chaga to me in a message. :)
I've not tried it...sounds really important to get it...

 

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