Being In It for the Species The Kolbrin Bible Complete Danjeon Breathing System Home Study System

Author Topic: AURORA BOREALIS: How far south will they go?  (Read 2749 times)

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32123
  • Karma: +26/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
AURORA BOREALIS: How far south will they go?
« on: January 30, 2012, 04:15:25 PM »
Spaceweather http://spaceweather.com/

ARIZONA AURORAS: The geomagnetic storm of Jan. 24th produced some spectacular auroras around the Arctic Circle. Unnoticed by most observers, the Northern Lights reached all the way down to Arizona. In Payson, AZ, a robotic camera system operated by amateur astronomer Chris Schur captured the telltale green glow:
"From sunrise to sunset, our automated robotic camera system with a fish-eye lens recorded the northern half of the sky every five minutes," says Schur. "When reviewing all the frames taken during this night of massive auroral storming to the north, I discovered that the display had reached us, too. The normally neutral grey sky to the north suddenly at around 3am glowed an intense green hue for only about half an hour, then returned to normal. Although we have some airglow visible on many nights here photographically, we never get one this bright. I suspect I was actually getting the topmost layers of the aurora which was seen in its entirety in the northern US that evening."

The auroras were not visible to the unaided eye. It took a five-minute exposure by a low-light astronomy camera to reveal the faint and distant lights. These "deep-sky auroras" are a promise of bigger things to come--maybe even naked-eye auroras in Arizona--as solar maximum approaches in 2013. "The sun," says Schur, "is finally waking up!"

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32123
  • Karma: +26/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: AURORA BOREALIS: How far south will they go?
« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2013, 08:17:42 AM »
http://www.spaceweather.com/

WEEKEND CME STRIKES: Over the weekend, a pair of CMEs hit Earth--one on May 18th (0100 UT) and another on May 19th (2250 UT). The impacts, especially the first one, rattled Earth's magnetic field and sparked Northern Lights visible as far south as Colorado. Some of the brightest appeared over Cape Cod, Massachusetts, where photographer Chris Cook took this self-portrait

"This is the first time since September 2005 that the lights have been visible from here," says Cook. " It was a beautiful display. During the peak, which lasted about 20 minutes, I could see red and pink pillars with my unaided eye." With only a short exposure, Cook's camera revealed the true depth of color shown above.
...
Spaceweather Photo Gallery of Auroras:

http://spaceweather.com/gallery/index.php?title=aurora&title2=lights

...

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32123
  • Karma: +26/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: AURORA BOREALIS: How far south will they go?
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2018, 01:49:46 PM »
http://spaceweather.com/

THE MYSTERY OF LAST FRIDAY'S AURORAS: Before sunrise on Friday, April 20th, Northern Lights spilled across the Canadian border into almost a dozen US states. The unexpected display was seen from Washington to Maine, with sightings as far south as Illinois and Indiana. "The lights danced from sunrise to sunset," reports eyewitness Thomas Spence, who sends this picture from the Superior National Forest  in the Arrowhead Region of Minnesota:
[See screen shot farther below]

The display was sparked by an interplanetary shock wave that hit Earth's magnetic field during the waning minutes of April 19th. Interplanetary shock waves are supersonic disturbances in the solar wind, causing sudden discontinuities in the speed, temperature, and density of gaseous material blowing around our planet. During periods of high solar activity, these shocks are routinely delivered to Earth by coronal mass ejections (CMEs)--that is, big explosions on the sun.

And therein lies the mystery.

There was no big explosion on the sun last week. So what caused the shock wave? No one knows. Despite the fact that there are multiple satellites keeping an eye on the sun 24/7, we missed something. The stealthy disturbance left the surface of the sun and traveled across the sun-Earth divide, unseen and undetected for several days, before it hit, sparking a moderately strong G2-class geomagnetic storm attended by strangely colored, widespread auroras. Surprises are still possible in space weather, after all.

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32123
  • Karma: +26/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: AURORA BOREALIS: How far south will they go?
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2018, 02:15:27 PM »
PS To reiterate, the main point is, auroras were seen as far south as Illinois and Indiana and according to spaceweather.com there is no explanation for them. (What caused them to occur.)
I would upload more pics but for some reason I cannot get the spaceweather.com gallery to open up...

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32123
  • Karma: +26/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: AURORA BOREALIS: How far south will they go?
« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2018, 03:19:30 PM »
I still cannot open up the spaceweather gallery but here is one image I capturted online. Davis illinois aurora.

Auroras Taken by Tom Naber on April 20, 2018 @ Davis, IL

http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=144015&PHPSESSID=s8v1l1snsmn6ehcuh8vn6fl567

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5530
  • Karma: +19/-0
Re: AURORA BOREALIS: How far south will they go?
« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2018, 04:30:04 PM »
What a beautiful photo Barb!  :)

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32123
  • Karma: +26/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: AURORA BOREALIS: How far south will they go?
« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2018, 08:49:45 PM »
What a beautiful photo Barb!  :)

It is beautiful.
The only time I got a glimpse of the auroras was up around the 48th parallel, Sequim, WA. 
Almost as far north as the southwest coast of England...
Of course the auroras have been spotted much farther south than that...

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32123
  • Karma: +26/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: AURORA BOREALIS: How far south will they go?
« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2018, 04:13:25 AM »
http://spaceweather.com/

http://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_upload.php?upload_id=147581

Lightning and Auroras, West Lafayette, IN Hongming Zheng 8-26-2018

 

Surviving the Planet X Tribulation: A Faith-Based Leadership Guide

Surviving the Planet X Tribulation: A Faith-Based Leadership Guide

This uplifting and entertaining guide is written to give you, the reader, confidence and hope through effective leadership techniques and survival community strategies designed for an extended tribulation. Learn more...

Advertise

Marshall's Motto

Destiny comes to those who listen, and fate finds the rest.

So learn what you can learn, do what you can do, and never give up hope!