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Author Topic: Solar Power  (Read 10065 times)

ilinda

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Re: Solar Power
« Reply #30 on: January 26, 2019, 08:39:29 AM »
Ilinda, Could you post more info on DC lighting? 
After viewing a video of scientist Alexander Wunsch (there are several so hope I have the right link) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mOQ2SmaDLOY
I decided to swap out all our LED lights in our solar-powered "lean-to" for halogen lights.  The 12 V halogen lights are higher wattages than most LED, but lower than most incandescent bulbs.  And Dr. Wunsch has talked about the halogen being safer.

One caveat is that after hearing of this, hubby bought some halogen bulbs for conventional 110V AC systems, and installed them in our living quarters, but we notice they burn out quickly!  It's ridiculous!  However those 12V halogen bulbs in our lean-to seem to be very long lasting and in fact, I've not had to replace one yet.

The attached pic shows two halogen bulb cartons, small halogen bulb in center of pic, with an LED bulb above, for comparison.  Note that there is a new vocabulary with accessories in solar power. 

For example, you can use a DC bulb in a conventional lamp that would ordinarily be used in 110V AC system, as long as you have the correct adaptor, PLUS you make certain it is boldly labeled DC only if you have a DC/AC combination system.  If your system is totally DC, the labeling is probably not as important, as long as everyone using it knows it is DC and does not try to use AC appliances.

There is an adaptor needed to connect the halogen bulb with its two pins, into the lamp.  The MR16 adaptor is needed.  Note in the attached picture, the LED bulb above plugs into an adaptor, that then screws into the lamp.  In other words, the adaptor has threads on the male portion, which would screw into a lamp, and on the other end it has two thin holes where the pins from the bulb insert.

Also, note that there are other bulbs with pins that are a different distance apart, and possibly having different diameter of pins.  I don't know all the details, but MR16 is not the only type of adaptor.  It just happens to be the one which correctly adapts these bulbs to a conventional lamp which accepts a screw-in bulb.

I get most of my bulbs from https://www.lightbulbs.com and have found them to be a good source of a lot of variety.

R.R. Book

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Re: Solar Power
« Reply #31 on: January 26, 2019, 02:28:55 PM »
Thank you so much, Ilinda, for excellent detailed information and the photo!

ilinda

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Re: Solar Power
« Reply #32 on: January 26, 2019, 04:02:08 PM »
Hubby commented that another factor in the longevity of bulbs might be the manufacturer.  He said all the 110-120V halogen bulbs he bought for our living area are G.E.  Still we don't know if G.E. makes halogen bulbs of lesser quality, or if higher voltage is just a lot more damaging and destructive to the bulbs than 12V.

R.R. Book

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Re: Solar Power
« Reply #33 on: January 26, 2019, 06:16:56 PM »
Ilinda, Can the adaptors be used to convert any normal lamp to DC?

That would open possibilities here that we hadn't considered.  For example, a light for the privy that wouldn't require batteries.

We never really felt the need to place lights on the solar/wind system before, but in the event of an extended outage beyond what we've experienced, it might make sense to selectively connect up some DC lights.


ilinda

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Re: Solar Power
« Reply #34 on: January 27, 2019, 05:40:02 PM »
Ilinda, Can the adaptors be used to convert any normal lamp to DC?

That would open possibilities here that we hadn't considered.  For example, a light for the privy that wouldn't require batteries.

We never really felt the need to place lights on the solar/wind system before, but in the event of an extended outage beyond what we've experienced, it might make sense to selectively connect up some DC lights.
As far as I know, they can.  There is a term for the screw-in base (?E 27?) that is standard in conventional lamps used in 110-120V AC systems.  Every lamp in our DC lean-to was purchased from a thrift store, or yard sale, etc., and I bought a package of 10 or so of those adaptors so we'd always have plenty.  One of the lamps is a cool-looking floor lamp with a flexible goose-neck which can be turned in about any direction.

And not only that, but I wired conventional AC outlets into our DC lean-to, so that the conventional-looking lamps and conventional-looking AC outlets all appear to be AC.  Of course, this is an excellent example of why mixing AC and DC into the same building isn't a good idea, especially if a visitor doesn't know the system, and especially if the DC is wired as I have done.   (It probably wouldn't pass code.)

On the other hand, it may be easier, if you are doing only one lamp, to wire into a cigarette-lighter-like DC plug.  You already know how to do the wiring, so that will be your choice, but I mention this for those who are still contemplating.

  I'll post a pic of adaptors for better visuals.

R.R. Book

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Re: Solar Power
« Reply #35 on: January 28, 2019, 06:35:13 AM »
Thanks so much Ilinda!

ilinda

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Re: Solar Power
« Reply #36 on: January 29, 2019, 03:48:03 PM »
Here are a couple of close-ups, showing the adaptors.  I must have bought two packages as this one is nearly empty and I have an unopened one that appears to have 15 adaptors inside.  They are not expensive, so it's worthwhile to buy a few more than you think you'll need for your first project.

Not sure how clear the small text will show up onscreen, but on each adaptor is the label, "84575  E27 male to MR16 female".  The 84575 is probably the catalog or item #, or was at that time.  On this screen the two tiny holes where the pins insert appear clearly visible.  Hope this helps.

For someone who has not followed this thread, this adaptor will allow an MR16 two-pin base bulb (LED or halogen) insert into a conventional lamp socket, as the E27 end of the adaptor screws into any "conventional" E27 lamp socket.

R.R. Book

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Re: Solar Power
« Reply #37 on: January 29, 2019, 04:00:59 PM »
Thanks for the photo Ilinda.  It looks very simple to use!

ilinda

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Re: Solar Power
« Reply #38 on: January 30, 2019, 01:42:47 PM »
Another stray thought about a barebones solar power system:

I remember reading that in the earlier solar panel systems, a person who wanted something rather "primitive" would have to consider the fact that at night, the current would/could flow from the batteries to the panels, unless a diode was inline.  The diode will allow only one-way traffic, and installed correctly, will only allow electricity to flow from panels to battery bank, but never in reverse.

In modern day, complex systems, that problem has been taken care of, and although I have no idea where diodes may be, or if they have been replaced by something more high-tech, that problem no longer exists.  However someone who wants for example, only lights from their system, then they may set up panels, batteries, and lights.  So, it pays to investigate whether the panels themselves have some sort of diode to prevent accepting current from the batteries at night. 

Here:  https://www.google.com/search?q=diode&client=firefox-b-1&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=sAdg96zIgm3_VM%253A%252CsMMORFft4Z8J9M%252C%252Fm%252F029d4&usg=AI4_-kSMgoo8NqBJhpmVNIlMwYkXKJfwMw&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjvn4GXvJbgAhWg8oMKHUNECR8Q_h0wHnoECAUQDA#imgrc=sAdg96zIgm3_VM:

ilinda

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Re: Solar Power
« Reply #39 on: November 02, 2019, 05:44:15 PM »
This prototype car featured below is slated to become available next year:

https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/solar-powered-electric-vehicle-never-130003416.html

Business
This Solar-Powered Electric Vehicle Never Needs to Be Charged
 Peter Jackson,Robb Report Fri, Nov 1 8:00 AM CDT
   
 Click here to read the full article.
California’s Aptera Motors has released details of what they are calling the first prototype automobile that will never require charging. Aptera’s “Never Charge” system uses solar panels integrated into the car’s body that supply a claimed 40 miles of driving per day and up to 11,000 miles per year with no impact on performance.
“The average driver in the US drives 29 miles per day, so now for most American consumers, the Aptera is a vehicle you never have to plug in to the wall to receive any charge,” says Chris Anthony, Aptera’s co-CEO. “If you put our same solar package on a Prius, you could get maybe six or eight miles of charge range a day, which some people might find compelling, if you have a really short commute. For most people, it wouldn’t be worth the expense of the solar. But when you only burn 100 watt-hours per mile, like the Aptera does, the same solar package can get you 40+ miles a day of range.”
More from Robb Report
   •   China's Biggest Electric Car Maker Might Have Solved the EV Charge-Time Conundrum
   •   Bollinger Finally Put a Price on Its All-Electric Utility Trucks--and You Can Have One for $125,000
   •   Drako Unveils The Most Powerful All-Electric Grand Tourer on the Planet
Those 40 miles of essentially free range are collected by over three square meters of solar panels, designed to be easily upgradable and replaceable over the car’s life. That complements the version capable of 1,000 miles from a single charge obtained via a 110-volt outlet, commonly found in every American household. “Our vehicle is unique in that most electric cars you can never really charge off a 110-volt outlet,” says Anthony. “It’s not enough power to charge a Tesla or Chevy Bolt. But with our vehicle, the same outlet that you use to charge your cell phone can charge 130 miles of range per hour.”
The three-wheel Aptera uses individual wheel-mounted electric motors to propel a chassis with only 10 key structural components, with the base model a claimed 1,800 pounds (the 1,000- mile edition is 2,200 pounds).
The Aptera is still in the prototype stage. Notes Anthony: “We’re hoping by the end of the first quarter of next year we’ll have those [prototypes] driving, and we’re hoping to start regular production by the end of 2020.”

R.R. Book

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Re: Solar Power
« Reply #40 on: November 03, 2019, 03:46:05 AM »
Very interesting Ilinda - I found the price on their website:

Quote
Our initial target price is $36k-$59k.

I can remember back in the '60s that our local post office had numerous accidents with 3-wheelers tipping over on turns...


ilinda

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Re: Solar Power
« Reply #41 on: November 03, 2019, 01:03:26 PM »
Judging from the shape of that postal service vehicle, it's easy to see how they would be turning over with regularity!  Sort of like an amusement ride, maybe.  When compared to that nifty-looking Aptera, this new solar car would win hands down.

Didn't even think to check price, as I had assumed around $80,000 or more!  Their price is in the same league with plenty of "regular" cars.

 

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