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Author Topic: Healing plants, herbs and foods  (Read 70377 times)

R.R. Book

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #225 on: August 12, 2018, 04:24:56 PM »
I use wild yam cream topically on a regular basis, per doctor's orders.  Can't imagine that being deadly, as it is a food and contains weak amounts of phyto-progesterone that are beneficial to post-menopausal women.  But maybe I underestimate the strength of homeopathics?

ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #226 on: August 13, 2018, 07:41:33 PM »
I use wild yam cream topically on a regular basis, per doctor's orders.  Can't imagine that being deadly, as it is a food and contains weak amounts of phyto-progesterone that are beneficial to post-menopausal women.  But maybe I underestimate the strength of homeopathics?
I don't believe the material wild yam is deadly, as I also use it daily.  But the homeopathic wild yam is an energy version, and homeopathic remedies are usually for a specific ailment or condition, usually with a course of treatment, but not meant to take every day for the rest of one's life.

What I had been doing was gradually increasing the potency, beginning at 1C, and by 20C, I got the message to stop.  I realized later that the reason I was taking it was not a disease or medical condition, but more of a quasi-cosmetic reason.  Not necessary, but desired.  I just had not realized how powerful homeopathics can be.

But if a person has found that a particular potency of wild yam works for them, that would probably be fine.  Problem is, I hadn't found that perfect potency, and had probably accidentally gotten into potencies too powerful for my own good.

Is the wild yam you take homeopathic?  If so, which potency?

R.R. Book

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #227 on: August 14, 2018, 06:59:01 AM »
Mine is a purely topical cream. 

Well, I have a fresh respect for the potency of homeopathics now!   :)

ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #228 on: September 19, 2018, 10:09:23 AM »
In reviewing my decades-old HerbalGram magazines before donating them to an herbalist and her herb shop, I am discovering things I had long since forgotten, and some of these are incredible.  I could not find copyright infringement notices of any kind, so am reposting an article from HerbalGram No. 26, (1992).  Also, note that this article may be relevant to a new rash of "food doctoring" in which strawberries have apparently been spiked with needles, as posted elsewhere on PXTH. 

The following is posted, not because I am suggesting those so affected should avoid the allopathic medical community and instead try the following procedure.  But in a crisis situation where no physician or medical help is available, the following information could save a life.

Traditional Chinese Medicine — (chives for swallowed pins & needles)
By Albert Leung, Ph.D.
Here are two simple but interesting remedies from a single issue of the Sichuan Zhongyi  (Sichuan Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine), …the second remedy may be new to most Westerners.

….Jiucai (Chinese chives, allium tuberous) for removing swelled needles in children.  Sichuan Zhongyi, 8(11): 2-3 (1990).
These two cases are reported by Zhou Laifa of the PLA Hangzhou Sanatorium.

Case 1 was a five-year-old girl who had accidentally swallowed a 4-cm-long needle.  On presentation, X-ray examination revealed that the needle was lodged crosswise at the lesser curvature of the stomach.  Following a folk remedy, 250 g of fresh Chinese chives were cut into 3-inch lengths, cooked to half-done, and fed to the child all at once.  The next morning, no needle was found in the child’s feces.  X-ray examination revealed that the needle had moved down to the ileocecal region.  Another 250 g of Chinese chives were used in the same manner as before.  The next morning, the needle was found excreted in the feces wrapped in the chives.  The patient suffered no deleterious effects.

Case 2 was a six-year-old boy who had accidentally swallowed a pin.  X-ray examination revealed the pin lodged crosswise at the gastropyloric region.  Immediately, 400 g of Chinese chives were cooked as in the Case 1 example and fed to the child all at once.  The next morning, the pin was found excreted in the feces, wrapped in the chives.  The patient suffered no ill effects,

Chinese chives are sold in Chinatowns in major cities.  They are called “gao choi” in Cantonese and “jiu Cai” in Mandarin.  Flowers and leaves are sold separately as vegetables; the seeds are used as a male tonic.  There are two kinds of leaves:  the blanched (yellow) and unbalanced (green).  Blanches chives are produced by depriving the plant of sunlight during part of its growth; these leaves are normally used in wonton soups and have different flavor than that of unbalanced chives.  The leaves used in the remedy are unbalanced.

This is not the first report  of using Chinese chives to remove swallowed pins and needles that I have seen.  The difference is that this report traced the location of the swallowed needle/pin.  I am not familiar with what modern physicians normally do in this kind of situation, but the Chinese chives method seems so easy and effective.

(HerbalGram offers the material in this article for informational purposes only, not to be used as a basis for self-medication.)
(This article was originally published on page 34 of HerbalGram No. 26  — 1992.)

R.R. Book

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #229 on: September 19, 2018, 10:44:47 AM »
Found this handsome bunch of them:


ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #230 on: September 20, 2018, 01:40:41 PM »
Makes one wonder if all chives have the same qualities. 

ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #231 on: September 20, 2018, 01:47:57 PM »
In that same article containing the Chinese chives research, entitled "Traditional Chinese Medicine", HerbalGram No. 26 -- 1992, is a discussion of peanut leaves for insomnia.

"Use of fresh peanut shoots in treating insomnia."    Sichuan Zhongyi 8,(11)29-30 (2990).  This is a report by Yang Ceming of the Nuclear Industry No. 416 Hospital in Chengdu.  Yang tried peanut shoots on his patients suffering from insomnia and found the treatment to be fast, effective, simple, and economical with no adverse side effects.

Method:  Place 30 g fresh young shoots in a teacup and pour in 150 ml boiling water.  Drink this tea one hour before retiring every night.  It normally takes only two to three days to take effect.

The author did not give the number of patients treated by this method.   

R.R. Book

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods: Disinfo Campaign Against Superfoods
« Reply #232 on: October 07, 2018, 11:27:37 AM »
For at least a decade now, many of us have been learning about Superfoods and trying to include more of them in our diets.  They tend to be from plants which naturally happen to be highly colored and flavored:



Here's an article, however, which says that Big-Agra and Big-Pharma are withdrawing their funding from periodicals which mention Superfoods, and furthermore may even be actively persuading editors to include disinformation debunking their benefits.  Never mind that scientific journals have published countless clinical trial results unequivocally concluding their importance to human health.

https://www.thesleuthjournal.com/the-fake-news-war-on-superfoods/

Quote
Among the superfoods attacked...are quinoa, goji and acai berries, chia seeds, maca tea, coconut oil, spirulina, kale, all of which have a solid record of aiding people’s nutrition.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2018, 12:05:23 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #233 on: October 07, 2018, 03:50:36 PM »
Any time anyone tries to discredit organic, brightly colored fruits and veggies, many people nowadays know to run in the other direction (towards those brightly colored fruits and veggies)!

R.R. Book

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #234 on: October 07, 2018, 04:49:54 PM »
Absolutely!  :)

R.R. Book

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #235 on: November 28, 2018, 09:44:09 AM »
Ranking of antioxidant levels in northern berry species:


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3751288/figure/F0001/

One of the most remarkable conclusions of this study was that the antioxidant levels were so high that heat-processing didn't significantly reduce their value.  Good to know for those who put up preserves and dehydrate.

Another study demonstrated that liquid preparations of the berries at the higher antioxidant (left-side) end of the spectrum remained shelf-stable and did not deteriorate over time:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23868799
« Last Edit: November 28, 2018, 09:54:44 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #236 on: November 28, 2018, 11:52:05 AM »


Another study demonstrated that liquid preparations of the berries at the higher antioxidant (left-side) end of the spectrum remained shelf-stable and did not deteriorate over time:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23868799
Fascinating about the liquid preps.  Maybe liquefying the berries makes the nutrients more readily accessible to our digestive tracts.  Makes sense, as "they" often say we don't chew our food properly, which means nutrients go down the drain, literally.

R.R. Book

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #237 on: November 30, 2018, 04:40:21 AM »
Adding another ORAC score profile which includes a few other berries not previously mentioned:


http://www.traditional-foods.com/antioxidants/elderberries/

If I understand the antioxidant measurement scale correctly, the values in the chart in the previous post are stated in micromols of *Trolox Equivalents/100g fresh weight, while the values in this chart may just be stated in µmTE (not divided by 100).  Please feel welcome to correct me, if anyone can find a better definition.

So Black Raspberries as measured on this chart at 192 µmTE ORAC would fit between the highest two berries scored on the above chart, Lingonberries and High-Bush Cranberries, if dividing by 100.

*Trolox Equivalents are total antioxidant strength of all antioxidants present in a food, unsorted by type.

Also noteworthy in the above ORAC study in Post #235: Dehydrated berries are 10x higher in antioxidants than fresh, and wild berries are at least twice as potent as cultivated, so by all means we should plan to stash fruit leather/dried fruits, and go foraging

Discrepancies between same berry-type on the two charts can be attributed to the soil composition in which each berry sample was grown, so values do vary widely by geographical location, but berries that tend to have high ORAC scores will consistently be at the higher end of the scale.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2018, 05:42:58 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #238 on: January 06, 2019, 08:36:54 AM »

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/how-sesame-seeds-could-save-your-life
 Sayer Ji, Founder of GreenMedInfo.com
How Sesame Seeds Could Save Your Life

Posted on:   Saturday, October 20th 2018 at 5:30 am
Written By:   Sayer Ji, Founder
This article is copyrighted by GreenMedInfo LLC, 2018


We don't think of sesame seed paste as a 'life saver,' but compelling research shows it is capable of reducing blood markers of cardiovascular disease risk by 39% within only six weeks.

Sadly, in the Western world, when the average Joe thinks of protecting himself from heart disease, aspirin and statin drugs are often as high on the list – if not higher – than exercise and eating better. Through decades of intense marketing and miseducation millions have been made to think of the #1 killer as an inevitable force; one against which we fling pills and various pharmaceutical potions to 'minimize risk,' never to strike to the core of the problem and resolve it permanently.

This is one reason why natural medicine continues to gain popularity, as it is founded in more than a palliative approach to disease, and does not require the ingestion of patented chemicals (i.e. pharmaceuticals) whose side effects are often worse and far more plentiful than their claimed therapeutic ones. Instead of simply managing and/or suppressing symptoms, the goal is to invoke bodily self-healing, which is to say remove the interference that keeps it from doing so. And often, this is simply a matter of modifying the diet – adding something medicinal here, removing something not so healthy there.  

One of the most promising studies to come through the biomedical pipeline of late was a gem published in the journal Archives of Iranian Medicine, and which looked at a traditional, sesame-based food-medicine known as Ardeh (aka tahini) for its ability to decrease cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetics – a group whose risk of cardiac mortality is greatly enhanced due to unhealthy ratios and quantities of blood lipids associated with chronically elevated blood sugar, glycation and insulin resistance.

Titled, "Ardeh (Sesamum indicum) Could Improve Serum Triglycerides and Atherogenic Lipid Parameters in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial", the study consisted of 41 patients with type 2 diabetes, who were randomly assigned to one of the two groups: group A (Ardeh 28 g/d, n = 21) and group B (control, n = 20).  The patients in group A were given 28 grams (two tablespoons) of Ardeh with their breakfast, while group B patients continued with their regular breakfast, both for six months (the energy content of both groups was kept within the same range).

Both groups were evaluated at baseline and six weeks later for blood pressure, serum levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), LDL-C, HDL-C, and the so-called atherogenic index (i.e. heart disease promoting index) of plasma (AIP; log TG/HDL-C), TC/HDL-C ratio, and LDL/HDL-C ratio .

Remarkably, after the six week test period, significant positive changes were reported:
"After six weeks, there were significant decreases in serum TG (15.3 mg/dL) and AIP (39 %) in group A. Moreover, slight decreases in serum TC, LDL-C, and other atherogenic lipid parameters and a mild increase in HDL-C also were observed during Ardeh supplementation. Anthropometric measures and blood pressure were unchanged during the study period in both groups." [emphasis added]

Based on these promising observations the researchers concluded: "Ardeh could have favorable effects in decreasing CVD risk factors in type 2 diabetics." Keep in mind that they found a 39% decrease in the so-called atherogenic index of plasma (AIP), which is no small effect for a relatively small dietary change. It should be noted that the brand of tahini used in this study (Oghab Halva Company) had no additional additives or oil. It was ground sesame seed, plain and simple. Were this a drug trial, results like these would be broadcast the world over as the next life-saving (multi-billion dollar selling) blockbuster drug. For a more detailed explanation of the results, read the entire study at the link here.

This is not the first human clinical study to find a beneficial effect of sesame on cardiovascular health or diabetes. Here are few others:
   •   A 2012 study published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology found that "Sesame oil consumption exerts a beneficial effect on endothelial function in hypertensive men.[ii]
   •   A 2010 study published in the journal Clinical Nutrition found that "Sesame oil exhibits synergistic effect with anti-diabetic medication in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus."iii]
   •   A 2006 study published in the Journal of Medical Food found that "The substitution of sesame seed oil as the sole edible oil lowers blood pressure and glucose in hypertensive diabetics."[iv]
   •   A 2006 study published in the Yale Journal of Biological Medicine found that "Sesame seed oil has a beneficial effect in hypertensive patients on either diuretics or beta-blockers."[v]
Sesame is truly a super star among medicinal foods.  In fact, recently, we reported on a study that found that eating 40 grams of sesame seeds, or the equivalent of two tablespoons of tahini, was superior to Tylenol in reducing pain in those suffering from knee arthritis. You can also take  a look at the over 40 health benefits of sesame seed and/or its components on our sesame seed health benefits research page to learn more about this remarkable healing food.

Let's face it. At this point, with human clinical research from respected, peer-reviewed journals revealing that simple dietary changes – yes, as simple as eating some sesame paste (tahini) daily -- can have huge impacts on risk factors for the most deadly and common diseases known in modern times, the time has come to reevaluate what exactly it is that is going on under the name of medicine today. Drugs don't cure disease any more than bullets cure war. Foods, on the other hand, can be curative, and may just help us to put our 'war against heart disease' – like are failed 'war on cancer' --  to rest once and for all.
Finally, for a quick tahini recipe, take a look at this About.com how to, and consider super-charging the heart-friendly properties of this food with the addition of garlic, whose life-saving properties we have expanded on in another article.
References



Parvin Mirmiran, Zahra Bahadoran, Mahdieh Golzarand, Asadolah Rajab, Fereidoun Azizi. Ardeh (Sesamum indicum) Could Improve Serum Triglycerides and Atherogenic Lipid Parameters in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial.  Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2013 Apr;20(2):202-8. doi: 10.1177/2047487312437625. Epub 2012 Jan 25.


[ii] Kalliopi Karatzi, Kimon Stamatelopoulos, Maritta Lykka, Pigi Mantzouratou, Sofia Skalidi, Nikolaos Zakopoulos, Christos Papamichael, Labros S Sidossis. Sesame oil consumption exerts a beneficial effect on endothelial function in hypertensive men. Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2012 Jan 25. Epub 2012 Jan 25. PMID: 22345690


[iii] Devarajan Sankar, Amanat Ali, Ganapathy Sambandam, Ramakrishna Rao. Sesame oil exhibits synergistic effect with anti-diabetic medication in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Clin Nutr. 2011 Jun ;30(3):351-8. Epub 2010 Dec 16. PMID: 21163558


[iv] D Sankar, M Ramakrishna Rao, G Sambandam, K V Pugalendi. A pilot study of open label sesame oil in hypertensive diabetics. J Med Food. 2006 Fall;9(3):408-12. PMID: 17004907


[v] D Sankar, M Ramakrishna Rao, G Sambandam, K V Pugalendi. Effect of sesame oil on diuretics or Beta-blockers in the modulation of blood pressure, anthropometry, lipid profile, and redox status. Yale J Biol Med. 2006 Mar;79(1):19-26. PMID: 17876372

R.R. Book

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #239 on: January 06, 2019, 01:42:38 PM »
Very valuable info Ilinda - thank you so much. 

For those who can eat sesame, there are some other beneficial properties of it as well, such as being antimicrobial and protective of breast tissue.

Definitely agree that aspirin and statins come with serious risks. 

For those who form stones and can't consume sesame, at least a gram a day of lecithin preserves the pliability of blood vessel walls, while vitamin E (mixed tocopherols) &/or krill (mixed tocotrienols) thin the blood with less wear and tear on the gastric lining than aspirin.  High-dose B-complex also prevents homocysteine formation.
« Last Edit: January 06, 2019, 02:48:09 PM by R.R. Book »

 

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