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Author Topic: What can U eat? Foraging, finding/ Merged Topics  (Read 22265 times)

ilinda

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Re: What can U eat? Foraging, finding/ Merged Topics
« Reply #45 on: December 30, 2018, 08:42:37 AM »

Thanks for adding your interesting research to improve our knowledge base on this Ilinda!
Thanks actually should be directed to GreenMedInfo.com, as I signed up to receive their free email updates, and OMG, what a great resource they are for health and medical information, with ever-growing databases on many subjects.

R.R. Book

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Re: What can U eat? Foraging, finding/ Merged Topics
« Reply #46 on: December 30, 2018, 10:08:46 AM »
I did follow up on their B12 articles, and found this one to be interesting:

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/article/cyanocobalamin-required-correct-mild-vitamin-b12-deficiency-elderly-200-times-

Quote
The cyanocobalamin required to correct mild vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly is 200 times greater than the recommended dietary allowance.

Also, I found this explanation of the Lactobacillus reuteri that you had mentioned: it is from sourdough.
http://www.greenmedinfo.com/article/lactobacillus-reuteri-produces-cobalamin

However, the article on b12 in white button mushrooms that you referred to said that the b12 content is significant, so that might be an ideal source for those with gastric intolerance of algae products.
http://www.greenmedinfo.com/article/white-button-mushrooms-contain-significant-quantities-bioavailable-vitamin-b12



ilinda

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Re: What can U eat? Foraging, finding/ Merged Topics
« Reply #47 on: December 31, 2018, 07:54:07 PM »
Yes, wasn't that a total surprise--the white button mushrooms we see everywhere in the grocery stores? 

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Re: What can U eat? Foraging, finding/ Merged Topics
« Reply #48 on: January 21, 2019, 05:23:27 AM »
http://eattheweeds.com/  Green Deane
http://huntgathergroweat.com
Just uploaded to YouTube: 25 edible plants, fruits and trees for wilderness survival.

A list that is pleasantly presented but also contains many varieties that will quickly reemerge after total devastation... [i.e. limited catastrophists be damned].

A big problem with identifying wild edibles is... identifying them. YouTube, however, potentially offers a good solution for this and this Youtuber has take advantage of that potential, with a focus on visuals to help the viewer out
[there are loads of this kind of vids out there but i post this one because it stands out].
survival database
location, civilisation reboot, PERMACULTURE, postcataclysmic soil, Growing Soil 1.01

R.R. Book

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Re: What can U eat? Foraging, finding/ Merged Topics
« Reply #49 on: January 21, 2019, 07:06:04 AM »
Posting some thumbnails of the plants recommended on the film:


Primrose: grows 3 seasons in woodlands, spear-shaped leaves with hairy undersides growing in a basal rosette, high-carb roots


Thistle: edible roots in spring, high in carbs, stalks and leaves edible if thorns are cut off.


Fireweed: All parts edible and high-carb


Dandelion: All parts edible; roots best roasted and ground for a coffee substitute. High in iron.


Stinging Nettle: Droopy flowers; handle with gloves then hold over a fire to destroy stingers.


Dead Nettle: non-drooping purple or white flowers close to stem; no stingers


Daisy: distinguish bigger leaves from dog fennel's wiry leaves; pineapple-flavored flower-centers


Hawthorn: Edible red berries with dark depressions @ center in summer and autumn; grows on a tree; edible glossy leaves fingered rather than rounded grow on thorny branches; squeeze berries to expel stones.


Rowan berry: Grows on trees also called Mountain Ash.  Compound leaves with several leaflets attached to a central stem.  Berries must be cooked.  High in vitamin C and no stones to remove.


Garlic mustard: Leaves are garlic-scented.  All parts edible.  Available year-round.


Red or white clover: Shamrock leaves with white chevrons, available 3 seasons, high protein content, raw or cooked, same family as peas.


Greater and lesser knapweed: Thistle-like pink and white flower without the stickers.  Flower petals are the most edible part of the plant.


Burdock: Available 3 seasons; giant leaves hairy on the underside; all parts edible raw or cooked; peel roots first like a carrot, similar to potato in nutrients.


Elderberry; bush or tree producing shiny small black berry clusters; nutritional super-fruit; eat raw when completely ripe.  High in vitamin C.  Avoid eating stems.


Blackberry: Jagged serrated leaves grow in 3's or 5's.  Available year-round.  Fruit eaten raw.


Pineapple weed: maximum 1-foot height; yellow-green dome-shaped flowers without petals; thin, wiry leaves; plant releases pineapple scent when crushed.  All above ground parts safe to eat.  Eaten raw or steeped as a tea.


Available in autumn and winter after wild roses have bloomed.  May or may not have tendrils coming out of one end of the red berries.  Contain 10 x more vitamin C than oranges.  Cut open to remove seeds before eating.  Three times more calories than apples.


Crabapple: Varies between green and red.  Smaller than apples, growing on similar tree.  Too sour to eat raw.  Chop and cook like chunky applesauce and it will sweeten up.   


Pine needles: Available year-round.  High in vitamins A and C, but not calorie-dense.  Best steeped as a tea.


Pine nuts: Found around the base of the tree.  More calories than peanuts.  High in protein.  Need to get to them before the squirrels do.


Poppy seeds: Flowers have 4 overlapping red petals.  Harvest seeds from pods left after flowers have died and dropped petals.  Several times more calories than meat, @ 70% fat.  Edible raw. 


Walnuts: Unripe in green husks.  Look for crinkly brown husks.  High in calories and protein. 


Acorns: Grown on oaks.  Eaten whether husk is green or brown.  High in protein.  If bitter and full of tannins, boil for 1/2 hour before eating. 

ilinda

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Re: What can U eat? Foraging, finding/ Merged Topics
« Reply #50 on: January 21, 2019, 10:12:17 AM »
http://eattheweeds.com/  Green Deane
http://huntgathergroweat.com
Just uploaded to YouTube: 25 edible plants, fruits and trees for wilderness survival.

Thank you Soc, for posting this.  This is absolutely one of the best ever videos on wild edibles.  And thanks to RR for posting the still pics from the video.  Again, I don't think I've seen any videos that are so "to-the-point" as this, nor do many have such clear pictures.  I may return to this over and over.

Funny thing, I've read about some of these, including burdock, and burdock is one plant that often annoyed me to no end, I'm ashamed to admit, because it always seems to invade the garden and it always looks like too much work to harvest.  But after seeing the process for burdock in this video, I think we may have to try it this year.  When it invades the garden, it usually isn't just one plant, but maybe 10 or 20.  Happy wild-harvesting everyone!

Just think....free food with no planting or weeding.   

R.R. Book

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Re: What can U eat? Foraging, finding/ Merged Topics
« Reply #51 on: January 21, 2019, 11:03:39 AM »
It helps to have a tool like this for digging up burdock's long taproot:



I should mention that the thumbnail above is of a 2nd year common burdock plant.  A biennial, it is low to the ground in year one and dies at the end of year two.  Lesser Burdock lasts a few years longer.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2019, 01:08:58 PM by R.R. Book »

Yowbarb

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Re: What can U eat? Foraging, finding/ Merged Topics
« Reply #52 on: February 14, 2019, 08:48:34 PM »
I just merged a couple of topics,
Eat the weeds, which I had started, and an older one, What can you eat.
This will included foraging, finding and other food ideas.

Solani

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Ingenious Foods People Made During Famines
« Reply #53 on: February 20, 2019, 05:53:27 PM »
Ingenious Foods People Made During Famines

Links to share to various Social Media sites found on website, including links to other information through outside links.


By C. Davis February 19, 2015 13:14



My guess is none of you experienced a long-time hunger. But probably most of you are familiar with the feeling of skipping 2 or 3 meals. Not a very pleasant one. During that time did you experience fatigue or dizziness? These are the first general symptoms of malnutrition.

An average man cannot survive without food for more than 8 weeks. A famine may last for years like the Tempo Famine in Japan (4 years). Not many of us have such large stockpiles. And it’s not even enough to stockpile food in order to properly prepare since you may develop malnutrition if you lack a single vitamin in your diet.

During the Norway Famine



Bark Bread – is a bread made by adding inner bark (carries organic nutrients) to the flour as an extender to make it last longer, bake more breads and still keep them nutritious. In fact, bark meal contains more zinc, magnesium and iron then is found in rye and wheat and it is full of fiber.

It was widely used during Norway famine; the Finland Famine and it was commonly eaten by our ancestors.

The bark component was usually made from trees like elm, ash, aspen, rowan, birch, pine and moss.

The inner bark is the only part of a tree trunk that is actually edible, the remaining bark and wood is made up of cellulose which no man can digest. The dried and ground inner bark was added: about 1/3rd “bark flour” to the remaining grain flour.

The bark, however, adds a rather bitter taste to the bread, and gives particularly white bread a grey-green hue. Though bark today is sometimes added to pastry as a culinary curiosity, bark bread is considered an emergency food, and as is common with such food, phased out as soon as the availability of grain improves and people forget about it.

During the Famines of Russia



Breads out of orache and bran, fried on machine oil, as found at the siege of Leningrad

During famines in Russia, nettle and orache were used to make breads or soups (But you can also make polenta, pesto and purée). Chamiso and Shadscale (two species of orache) were also commonly eaten by Native Americans. Both rich in Vitamin E (much needed in a food crisis).

Nettle has a flavor similar to spinach (prepared in exactly the same way) when cooked and is rich in vitamins A, C, iron, potassium, manganese, and calcium. Soaking stinging nettles in water or cooking will remove the stinging chemicals from the plant.

Some breads were made out of orache and bran at the Siege of Leningrad, using machine oil – the only oil still available. (see picture) The city authorities provided the population with foodstuffs salvaged from industry. They made hard cakes of pressed seed hulls left over from processing of oil from sunflower, cotton, hemp or linseed. These seed cakes sustained many lives in Leningrad.

In France, Germany and Belgium During the Famine of WWI and WWII



Steckrübeneintopf

Rutabagas were widely used as a food of last resort in Europe during the famine of World War I and World War II. The roots are prepared for human food in a variety of ways, and the leaves can be eaten as a leaf vegetable. Especially the French and the Germans boiled rutabaga making a stew.

During the Irish Famine

It is also called “The Potato Famine” since it was caused by a devastating potato disease (blight).

Corn meal sold for a few times more pennies a pound, so the men were unable to earn enough money to adequately feed themselves let alone their families as food prices continued to climb.

As a result, children sometimes went unfed so that parents could stay healthy enough to keep working for the desperately needed cash. Many of the workers, poorly clothed, malnourished and weakened by fever, fainted or even dropped dead on the spot.

As the Famine worsened, and looters became commonplace and the British continually sent in more troops instead of food.

The Irish in the countryside began to live off:

– Wild blackberries
– Ate Nettles
– Turnips
– Several species of edible kelp, including dulse and Irish moss
– Old cabbage leaves
– Edible seaweed
– Fungi
– Shellfish
– Roots
– Frogs
– Roadside weeds
– and even green grass

Finally, Government-sponsored soup kitchens were established throughout the countryside and began dispensing a nutritious food called Stirabout.



‘Stirabout,’ si a substantial porridge made from two-thirds Indian corn meal and one-third rice, cooked with water. By the summer, three million Irish were being kept alive on a pound of stirabout and a four-ounce slice of bread each day.

Seed potatoes, many having been eaten, had been in short supply. Planters had either been involved in the public works projects or had been too ill to dig the next year. Others were simply discouraged, knowing that whatever they grew would be seized by landowners, agents or middlemen as back payment for rent.

In a food crisis you can buy EVERYTHING with food.

During the Mormon Famine in Western United States



Sego lily bulbs were eaten by the Mormon pioneers when their food crops failed. The flower is endemic to the Western United States and it is actually the state flower of Utah. The bulbs of the flower were roasted, boiled or made into porridge. The plant was also eaten by Native Americans.

During the Dutch Famine



During the WWII the northern provinces became isolated from the liberated parts of Europe. Food stocks ran out, as did fuel stocks. Then a harsh winter began.

Due to the war situation, tulip growers have not planted tulip bulbs that year; great amounts of tulip bulbs were stocked on farms throughout the country. During the famine authorities decided to use these stocks as food for the starving populations. The tulip bulbs were nutritious and relatively easy to cook.

Here’s an account about how they prepared the bulbs (of one of the survivors – Father Leo):

“The skin of the bulb is removed, pretty much like an onion, and so is the center, because that is poisonous. Then it is dried and baked in the oven. My mother or older sisters would grind the bulbs to a meal-like consistency. Then they would mix the meal with water and salt, shape it like a meatloaf, and bake it. I can still remember the taste of it: like wet sawdust…We still shared tulip bulbs and sugar beets with those with hand-drawn carts who continued to go from door to door. I think seeing my mother still give to the hungry at this time, even though we had very little, made me want to be a missionary.”

They also boiled and ate Sugar beets. These are high in fiber, manganese, and is a decent source of vitamin C, potassium and magnesium. The greens, though, are really the nutritional powerhouse of the plant. They are super high in fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, riboflavin, calcium, iron, magnesium, copper, manganese.

During most famines


Grass pea is a particularly important crop in areas that are prone to drought and famine and is thought of as an ‘insurance crop’ as it produces reliable yields when all other crops fail.

Well that’s something people eat when there’s nothing else to eat, because eating grass pea may cause a disease that basically paralyzes the lower limbs. The disease occurs only when the seeds are consumed as a primary protein source for a prolonged period but safe to eat for days maybe weeks.

When a famine occurs, that’s hell of a lot of people who end up eating this grass pea. The ratio is fairly small with about 10 out of 1000 people who get the disease.



Grass pea Soup and Bread

Flour was made out of grass peas (named almorta) and they mixed it with wheat flour to eliminate the toxicity.

During Holodomor (The Ukrainian Famine)

For those faint-hearted: don’t read the next paragraph. You’ll find 3 real recollections of survivors from one of the most horrific famines. I wanted to include this in the article, so people would better understand why and what do we prep for. And why having a food stockpile is an insurance you’ll not end up in this situation.

Olexandra Rafalska – one of the survivors – noted:

“…I have no idea how I managed to survive and stay alive. In 1933 we tried to survive the best we could. We collected grass, goose-foot, burdocks, rotten potatoes and made pancakes, soups from putrid beans or nettles.

Collected clay from the trees and ate it, ate sparrows, pigeons, cats, dead and live dogs. When there were still cattle, it was eaten first, then – the domestic animals. Some were eating their own children, I would have never been able to eat my child. One of our neighbors came home when her husband, suffering from severe starvation ate their own baby-daughter. This woman went crazy. “

Galina Smyrna, village Uspenka of Dniepropetrovsk region recollected:

“I remember Holodomor very well but have no wish to recall it. There were so many people dying then. They were lying out in the streets, in the fields, floating in the flux. My uncle lived in Derevka – he died of hunger and my aunt went crazy – she ate her own child. At the time one couldn’t hear the dogs barking – they were all eaten up.”

A boy, 9 years old back then (later known as Dr M.M.):

“Mother said, ‘Save yourself, run to town.’ I turned back twice; I could not bear to leave my mother, but she begged and cried, and I finally went for good.”

Preparing for a food crisis or famine means preparing for at least one year. But famines can last up to 7 years and it can be wiser to have the means to produce your own food rather than stockpiling. One of the best ways to do that is by building a system totally independent from the environment.

And this CAN be done.
~In order to determine what is possible, one only needs to step out into what is considered impossible and look around...~
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R.R. Book

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Re: What can U eat? Foraging, finding/ Merged Topics
« Reply #54 on: February 21, 2019, 11:11:16 AM »
Some very tasty meal ideas Solani!

Loved the seaweed soup idea, which reminded me of the ending of Secret of Roan Inish, when the family had returned to the island and needed to make dinner during a storm.  Found this short "how to" video that adds a fresh egg from the hen yard:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aqnaauW0zKY



Re: old cabbage leaves -

Yes, cabbage heads can be root cellared for many months at a time and still be edible.

Re: the Stirabout soup - it sounds very similar to Polenta, which is popular among the East Coast Italian communities.  Makes a delicious and satisfying meal.



Thanks for good suggestions on sourcing fresh ingredients for a starvation ration diet!  :)

Solani

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Re: What can U eat? Foraging, finding/ Merged Topics
« Reply #55 on: February 21, 2019, 12:26:03 PM »
Some very tasty meal ideas Solani!

Loved the seaweed soup idea, which reminded me of the ending of Secret of Roan Inish, when the family had returned to the island and needed to make dinner during a storm.  Found this short "how to" video that adds a fresh egg from the hen yard:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aqnaauW0zKY



Re: old cabbage leaves -

Yes, cabbage heads can be root cellared for many months at a time and still be edible.

Re: the Stirabout soup - it sounds very similar to Polenta, which is popular among the East Coast Italian communities.  Makes a delicious and satisfying meal.



Thanks for good suggestions on sourcing fresh ingredients for a starvation ration diet!  :)

I have quite a few "recipes" that I have found over the years, using food stuffs that most likely would get thrown out, or not even thought of being something you could make a meal out of.

I also have many recipes from when I was young and raising my children on my own. Had to get quite creative at times when your budget doesn't add up to being able to buy enough nourishing foods.

Unfortunately, I don't have that recipe book with me and don't know where it is at the moment. One of my kids may have it or... I'll try to remember the recipes I would make most often as they're still etched in what substitutes my brain...  8)

I just need to figure out where to post them...  ;)

//Solani
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R.R. Book

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Re: What can U eat? Foraging, finding/ Merged Topics
« Reply #56 on: February 21, 2019, 03:14:43 PM »
Very much looking forward to more, as you're able to post.  :)

ilinda

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Re: What can U eat? Foraging, finding/ Merged Topics
« Reply #57 on: February 21, 2019, 04:17:27 PM »
Solani, you manage to find such unique things to post.  I read a lot about "back-to-the-land" foods, survival foods, etc., but still your article had things I'd not heard about much, if any.

Stirabout is interesting and sounds flexible enough to tweak.  Plus bark bread.  Am thinking especially about elm and "slippery elm" in particular and how the inner bark of the slippery elm supposedly makes a very nutritous and delicious porride, sort of like oatmeal.

Funny thing--one time I watched the goats chowing down on Gingko leaves and decided since people can ingest gingko tea or tincture, the leaves would have to be non-poisonous.  I put one in my mouth and OMG, it was the most difficult thing to chew and in fact, impossible for a human to chew.  You'd choke if you tried, and I had to spit it out immediately!  (Tough as nails.)

Thanks for posting.

Yowbarb

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Re: What can U eat? Foraging, finding/ Merged Topics
« Reply #58 on: February 21, 2019, 11:42:26 PM »
Solani  ;) this is a good place for the famine foods and the recipes you posted.
Excellent posts all ya all,
Barb T.

 

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