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Author Topic: Fracking. Leaking and exploding pipeline disasters in the US  (Read 56341 times)

R.R. Book

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Re: Fracking. Leaking and exploding pipeline disasters in the US
« Reply #120 on: June 26, 2018, 05:43:37 AM »
Their discovery of water flowing that far down would seem to support a previous discussion that we had last year about "the waters of the deep" comprising a second ocean that might seep to the surface.  Does anyone remember where that discussion is located on the boards?

ilinda

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Re: Fracking. Leaking and exploding pipeline disasters in the US
« Reply #121 on: June 26, 2018, 08:59:51 AM »
Their discovery of water flowing that far down would seem to support a previous discussion that we had last year about "the waters of the deep" comprising a second ocean that might seep to the surface.  Does anyone remember where that discussion is located on the boards?
I looked a bit, unsuccessfully, but yowbarb is the expert at ferreting out so many things I cannot seem to find, so possibly she will chime in here.

I've read about this a few times elsewhere, and secretly hope that until our species learns how to treat our Planet with care, we will be unable to access that presumably pristine and pure, deep water.   When our species matures, then it will be wonderful to imagine having access to a water source that we would be intelligent enough to not pollute.

Yowbarb

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Re: Fracking. Leaking and exploding pipeline disasters in the US
« Reply #122 on: June 28, 2018, 08:56:43 PM »
This is long overdue Barb, and hopefully a legal precedent will be established in favor of human rights in this very important trial.

Sadly I can't even seem to find out what happened from all the activism in May.
I am not looking in the right places perhaps... I hope it is good news.

There have been some (lost) knock down drag out fights in PA, TX other states.

Yowbarb

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Re: Fracking. Leaking and exploding pipeline disasters in the US
« Reply #123 on: June 28, 2018, 08:58:02 PM »
Wonder what it is about Vermont and Maine, whereby they often are more forward-thinking than those in other states?  Thanks for posting, Barb, and maybe the idea will spread by osmosis!

Thanks... it is good to speak up about these things. The love for ones environment often transcends political party etc....so maybe humankind will prevail on this...

Yowbarb

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Re: Fracking. Leaking and exploding pipeline disasters in the US
« Reply #124 on: June 28, 2018, 09:00:05 PM »

(Editor's note:  not sure if this one is "leaking" yet, but as deep as it is, hard to believe the shaft would/could be totally intact.   They are supposedly not injecting any substance into the hole--we certainly hope not.)
http://scribol.com/a/environment/deepest-man-made-hole-ever-abandoned-due-to-astonishing-event/?utm_source=Yahoo-AdRizer&utm_campaign=87724&utm_term=HOMEPAGE_US~c&utm_medium=CPC&utm_content=


The Deepest Man-Made Hole Ever Created Was Sealed Up And Abandoned – Due To An Astonishing Event

By Suzi Marsh
April 17, 2018

Image: via The Earth Chronicles of Life
On a remote peninsula in north-west Russia, scientists have spent decades drilling down towards the center of the earth. At over 40,000 feet, their borehole is the deepest that man has ever gone. Then, however, something unexpected happens, and the researchers are forced to seal up their experiment for good.

Wow, ilinda I had not heard of this! Thanks for posting this and R.R. also thanks for your posts, and for helping look into this...
I will try to find out...

Yowbarb

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Re: Fracking. Leaking and exploding pipeline disasters in the US
« Reply #125 on: June 28, 2018, 09:03:05 PM »
Their discovery of water flowing that far down would seem to support a previous discussion that we had last year about "the waters of the deep" comprising a second ocean that might seep to the surface.  Does anyone remember where that discussion is located on the boards?
I looked a bit, unsuccessfully, but yowbarb is the expert at ferreting out so many things I cannot seem to find, so possibly she will chime in here.

I've read about this a few times elsewhere, and secretly hope that until our species learns how to treat our Planet with care, we will be unable to access that presumably pristine and pure, deep water.   When our species matures, then it will be wonderful to imagine having access to a water source that we would be intelligent enough to not pollute.

Hi Linda and R.R.:
I don't remember a topic or post about this previously... about underground "oceans" but I did post one thing, in one of the radiation or radioactive-related Topics.
What I posted was: In the desert southwest of the US, a massive underground water layer was discovered, (I think) sandwiched in between rock.)

This (WOULD HAVE BEEN) truly miraculous and a source of clean water for the future of  mankind in that region. But guess what?! The water layer was contaminated by atomic testing in the area.

I will try to find the link to the Topic and post.
Sorry not in a good mood about all this stuff.
- Barb T.

R.R. Book

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Re: Fracking. Leaking and exploding pipeline disasters in the US
« Reply #126 on: June 29, 2018, 10:23:00 AM »
It seems that the subterranean ocean discussion might have come up in one of Socrates' posts in response to one of Marshall's "Signs" updates:

https://planetxtownhall.com/index.php/topic,6645.msg95251.html#msg95251

ilinda

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Re: Fracking. Leaking and exploding pipeline disasters in the US
« Reply #127 on: June 29, 2018, 08:57:32 PM »
guess what?! The water layer was contaminated by atomic testing in the area.

Sorry not in a good mood about all this stuff.
- Barb T.[/color]
Like you, I waver back and forth, between mirth/glee and near depression due to our environmental crises, in particular what our species has been doing to the oceans, plus mucch more.

But then I think about Marshall's channeling which told him, "This is their chapter....".  And remember also that all chapters must end, eventually.

Yowbarb

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Re: Fracking. Leaking and exploding pipeline disasters in the US
« Reply #128 on: June 30, 2018, 11:19:57 AM »
guess what?! The water layer was contaminated by atomic testing in the area.

Sorry not in a good mood about all this stuff.
- Barb T.[/color]
Like you, I waver back and forth, between mirth/glee and near depression due to our environmental crises, in particular what our species has been doing to the oceans, plus mucch more.

But then I think about Marshall's channeling which told him, "This is their chapter....".  And remember also that all chapters must end, eventually.
Thanks, ilinda, that is a little bit comforting...

Yowbarb

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Re: Fracking. Leaking and exploding pipeline disasters in the US
« Reply #129 on: June 30, 2019, 05:04:41 PM »
https://www.ecowatch.com/fracking-ban-public-health-climate-2638928294.html?xrs=RebelMouse_fb&ts=1561046726&fbclid=IwAR1wMP9RjBkJRnYAD1HGVoBn3hioxVzzWan1nBRG95tJ3kr9VR7bTjhhbj0

Total Ban on Fracking Urged by Health Experts: 1,500 Studies Showed 'Damning' Evidence of Threats to Public Health, Climate

Common Dreams Jun. 20, 2019 09:32 AM EDT
By Jake Johnson

A comprehensive analysis of nearly 1,500 scientific studies, government reports, and media stories on the consequences of fracking released Wednesday found that the evidence overwhelmingly shows the drilling method poses a profound threat to public health and the climate.

The sixth edition of the Compendium of Scientific, Medical, and Media Findings Demonstrating Risks and Harms of Fracking (the Compendium), published by Physicians for Social Responsibility and Concerned Health Professionals of New York, found that "90.3 percent of all original research studies published from 2016-2018 on the health impacts of fracking found a positive association with harm or potential harm."

The analysis also found that:

69 percent of original research studies on water quality found potential for, or actual evidence of, fracking-associated water contamination;
87 percent of original research studies on air quality found significant air pollutant emissions; and
84 percent of original research studies on human health risks found signs of harm or indication of potential harm.
"There is no evidence that fracking can operate without threatening public health directly and without imperiling climate stability upon which public health depends," the Compendium states.

Sandra Steingraber, Ph.D., co-founder of Concerned Health Professionals of New York, said in a statement that "the case against fracking becomes more damning" with the publication of each edition of the Compendium.

"As the science continues to come in, early inklings of harm have converged into a wide river of corroborating evidence," said Steingraber. "All together, the data show that fracking impairs the health of people who live nearby, especially pregnant women, and swings a wrecking ball at the climate. We urgently call on political leaders to act on the knowledge we've compiled."

According to the Compendium, the first edition of which was published in 2014, the "feverish pace" of U.S. fossil fuel extraction — which has accelerated under President Donald Trump — "has spurred a massive build-out of fracking infrastructure," putting air quality and water sources at risk in communities across the United States.

In addition to the harmful effects of fracking on those who live near oil and gas development projects, the Compendium found, the drilling practice is "also at odds with the emerging scientific consensus on the scale and tempo of necessary climate change mitigation and with rising public alarm about the impending climate crisis that this consensus has amplified."

"Despite efforts by the gas industry to suppress all health data on fracking, the Compendium documents the serious harm fracking holds for pregnant women, children, and those with respiratory disease," Walter Tsou, MD, MPH, interim executive director of Philadelphia Physicians for Social Responsibility, said in a statement. "We need to ban fracking."

The sixth edition of the Compendium comes just days after more than 100 environmental groups sent a letter urging Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf to investigate the link between fracking and the emergence of rare childhood cancers in rural Pennsylvania counties.

As Steingraber — one of the letter's signatories — told online environmental outlet The Daily Climate on Wednesday, much of the data in the Compendium comes from Pennsylvania, which is home to over 100,000 active oil and gas wells.

"What makes fracking different from any other industry I've studied in public health is that there's no industrial zone," Steingraber said. "It's taking place literally in our backyards, and unfortunately some of the best evidence for both polluting emissions and emerging health crises is coming out of southwestern Pennsylvania."

EcoWatch
@EcoWatch
 Feds to Sell Even More Public Land for #Fracking Near Sacred Park http://ow.ly/EJ6U30nxY3X  @FrackAction @Frack_Off

10:00 PM - Feb 2, 2019


Yowbarb

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Re: Fracking. Leaking and exploding pipeline disasters in the US
« Reply #130 on: June 30, 2019, 07:04:58 PM »
Yowbarb Note: Started to post then realized this is a 2016 article. There may be more current data.

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-36823926

Fracking linked to asthma flare-ups
19 July 2016

he controversial method for mining natural gas known as fracking might trigger asthma flare-ups, according to a US study.

Pennsylvania doctors found patients' asthma was harder to control if they lived near a fracking site, compared with other asthma patients.

The findings, in more than 25,000 patients, are not proof of a causal effect.

The authors say in the journal JAMA that more safety studies are needed.

Fracking
Fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, involves drilling down miles underground and blasting the shale rock with a high-pressure water mixture to release the natural gas trapped inside.

Proponents say it has the potential to be greener, in terms of carbon footprint, than some other energy sources.

Critics are worried about the impact on humans and the planet - namely, air and water pollution, earth tremors and potential health risks.

Yowbarb

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Re: Fracking. Leaking and exploding pipeline disasters in the US
« Reply #131 on: June 30, 2019, 07:09:26 PM »
https://e360.yale.edu/features/a-fracking-driven-industrial-boom-renews-pollution-concerns-in-pittsburgh

A Fracking-Driven Industrial Boom Renews Pollution Concerns in Pittsburgh

Once known as the Steel City, Pittsburgh is shedding its polluted past and embracing a rebirth built on health care, education, and technology. But the region’s surging fracking industry is attracting a $6 billion ethane plant and other petrochemical facilities, raising new pollution fears.

BY NICK CUNNINGHAM  • MARCH 21, 2019

Pittsburgh is a city on the upswing, rebounding this century from its rustbelt past by developing more innovative sectors such as health care, education, and technology. Uber is testing its self-driving cars in Pittsburgh. Carnegie Mellon University is home to a world-renowned Robotics Institute. And the city made an aggressive bid for Amazon’s HQ2, which the mayor viewed as key to moving the Steel City beyond its roots in heavy industry.

Progress toward a cleaner, post-industrial future is not linear, however. Although the air in Pittsburgh has dramatically improved from the days when it was one of America’s most polluted cities, it still contains high levels of hazardous pollutants, in large part because of several major steel foundries and coke works still in operation, according to the Clean Air Council. The rise of hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas, now more than a decade old, has exacerbated regional air quality problems. Allegheny County, where Pittsburgh is located, is out of compliance with federal air quality standards on fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) and sulfur dioxide. In 2018, the region barely met the federal ozone standard after falling short in years past.

Now, Pittsburgh and the surrounding area are embracing a new wave of industry tied to the fracking boom in western Pennsylvania and eastern Ohio. Nothing better embodies this surge than a massive, $6 billion ethane cracker currently being built 30 miles northwest of Pittsburgh by Shell Chemical Appalachia, a subsidiary of the oil giant Royal Dutch Shell. The facility will process huge quantities of natural gas and natural gas liquids from the prolific Marcellus and Utica shales and turn them into the building blocks of plastic. The plastic pellets produced by “cracking” ethane molecules will then be sold to manufacturers producing consumer and industrial products such as plastic bags, packaging, automotive parts, and furniture.

When it comes online in 2021, Shell’s ethane cracker will also add significantly to air pollution in western Pennsylvania, becoming the region’s largest source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are harmful gases emitted by solids or liquids, including combusted fossil fuels. The facility will also emit substantial amounts of nitrogen oxide (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), fine particulate matter, and other hazardous air pollutants, the Clean Air Council says. All of these have been linked to an increased risk of respiratory problems such as asthma, as well as to cardiovascular effects and a heightened risk of cancer.

“Natural gas is going to be bigger than the steel industry 30 or 40 years ago,” says a union leader.
Environmental groups, along with some local residents, have fought the ethane cracker. But local and state political leaders are almost uniformly supportive of the project, regardless of party affiliation. So are labor leaders and many local citizens, seeing the arrival of Shell’s facility as a pivotal moment in the creation of a new, large-scale industrial sector that could rival the region’s glory days of steel production.

“Employment in western Pennsylvania has never been better,” says Ken Broadbent, business manager at Steamfitters Local 449, noting that construction at Shell’s ethane cracker will eventually provide jobs for 1,500 steamfitters, some of whom will make more than $100,000 a year. “I’ve never seen this many jobs for construction workers in western Pennsylvania, and I’ve been a steamfitter for 45 years. Natural gas is going to be bigger than the steel industry back 30 or 40 years ago. There’s 50 years to 100 years of natural gas in this tri-state region. This thing is not going away.”

Asked if he is concerned about air pollution from the plant, Broadbent acknowledged the threat, but said the economic opportunities are too important. “It concerns everybody — we fish, we hunt, our kids breathe the air like everybody else,” he said. “But we’ve also got to realize that people have got to work for a living, too. If you’re not working, it won’t matter how much pollution you have.”

Construction of the Shell facility is expected to reach its peak this year, with up to 6,000 total workers on site. When operational, the plant will employ 600 people on a permanent basis.

Pennsylvania’s Governor Tom Wolf, a Democrat, has hailed Shell’s ethane cracker as the “biggest private-sector investment in Pennsylvania since World War II” and touted the prospect of a transformation of western Pennsylvania as a fracking-driven energy “hub,” with the cracker just the first in a series of petrochemical projects. Executives and industry analysts refer to Shell’s ethane cracker as an “anchor” project around which new infrastructure would be built — the associated pipelines, compressor stations, gas processing facilities, and a new ethane storage facility.

But this reindustrialization of western Pennsylvania, and the resulting increase in air and water pollution, is of growing concern to some in the region. They note that in recent years the Pittsburgh area has benefitted from a job-creating shift to cleaner economic sectors, driven by major local institutions like the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

“This region for [the last] 30 years started making some really smart decisions — investing in education and health care, letting universities lead the way, letting innovation be the driver, having a much more diversified economy and, especially, climbing up the value chain and getting away from those basic commodities that leave a toxic legacy,” says Matt Mehalik, executive director of the Breathe Project, a local nonprofit working to reduce air pollution.

Others see the arrival of the ethane cracker as further evidence of the fracking industry’s increasing dominance of western Pennsylvania and eastern Ohio. Although the fracking boom has undeniably created jobs and pumped money into the region, scientists and environmentalists say it is bringing with it polluted wastewater, dirty air, roads crowded with gas industry trucks, and rural areas dotted with noisy and unsightly drilling platforms.

Ted Auch of the FracTracker Alliance, a non-profit that keeps tabs on the health effects of the shale gas industry, notes that it has gone through several phases over the past decade. At the start of each phase, he says, the industry pushed for new investments that justified the next level of intensification. First, the industry needed more pipelines in order to move excess gas out of the region. Then it needed more wells to dispose of fracking wastewater, says Auch. Then the ability to export gas abroad. A year ago, exports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) began from a newly constructed terminal on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland, moving Marcellus shale gas across the world to Japan.

Pittsburgh’s work on combatting climate change through 2030 would be negated by this single Shell plant.
Auch says he fears that Shell’s ethane cracker, plus others in the works, may unleash yet another wave of drilling. “So now we’re on like our third or fourth version of reasoning for why [the industry] needs X, Y, and Z,” says Auch.

Auch and others say that at a time when scientists are issuing increasingly stark warnings about the worsening impacts of global warming and the need to rapidly reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the fracking boom in northern Appalachia, coupled with the construction of related infrastructure and facilities, is moving the region and the U.S. in precisely the wrong direction. They note that in 2017 the city of Pittsburgh unveiled an ambitious plan to slash greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2030 (using a 2003 baseline), which would equate to a reduction of 2.1 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent per year. Shell’s ethane cracker, which needs to burn natural gas to create the high temperatures needed to “crack” ethane, is expected to emit 2.2 million tons of greenhouse gases annually. In other words, all of Pittsburgh’s work on combating climate change through 2030 would be negated by a single plant.

The plant’s critics also maintain that Shell’s ethane cracker represents a significant setback in the region’s long battle to clean up its air. Pittsburgh is ranked in the top 10 nationwide for most polluted cities in terms of year-round particulate matter. Allegheny County, where Pittsburgh is located, is ranked in the top 2 percent nationally in terms of cancer risk from hazardous air pollutants, according to a 2013 study by the Center for Healthy Environments and Communities at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.

Shell refutes the notion that its Pittsburgh-area ethane cracker will adversely affect the health of nearby communities. “Shell takes the health of the community and our staff very seriously,” says Joe Minnitte, a company spokesman. He notes that the potential health effects from hazardous air pollutants were evaluated when Shell applied for, and received, its air permits from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PA DEP). Indeed, the DEP concluded that the air and health impacts would not exceed federal standards.

“Inhalation risk assessments performed by Shell and PA DEP during that period concluded that chronic cancer and non-cancer risks as well as acute non-cancer risks do not exceed PA DEP’s benchmarks,” Minnitte says. Shell agreed to implement air quality monitoring around its facility.

[ CONTINUES https://e360.yale.edu/features/a-fracking-driven-industrial-boom-renews-pollution-concerns-in-pittsburgh ]

 

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