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Author Topic: FLOODING (US)  (Read 36293 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: FLOODING (US)
« Reply #180 on: March 15, 2019, 12:57:39 AM »
Major flooding in Nebraska, Iowa and South Dakota

Hundreds Evacuated in Historic Flooding in Nebraska, Iowa as Swollen Waterways Threaten Dams, Levees
By Pam Wright and Ron Brackett11 hours ago

weather.com

At a Glance
A third of the 24,000 residents in Norfolk, Nebraska, were ordered to evacuate Thursday.
Residents of a small Iowa town were given 10 minutes to evacuate.
Widespread damage was reported in Kilgore, Texas, from high winds.
A 'compromised' dam forced evacuations along the Niobrara River.

Flooding from heavy rain and a melting snowpack is threatening towns across the Midwest, swelling waterways to historic levels in places, compromising flood protections and triggering evacuations for hundreds of residents in Nebraska and Iowa.

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds on Thursday signed an emergency disaster proclamation that allows state resources to be used in response to flooding in the state. Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts had issued an Emergency Declaration on Tuesday.

Just before 11 a.m. Thursday, the residents of Hornick in western Iowa were ordered to evacuate immediately because of a levee breach on the West Fork of the Little Sioux River.


"They gave us about 10 minutes, so you just grab the things you need the most," Catie Newman told the Des Moines Register.

Sheriff's deputies and fire fighters went door to door warning the residents, the Sioux City Journal reported.

Newman, who is disaster response coordinator for the Iowa United Methodist Church and pastor of churches in Hornick and Salix, said tree branches and chunks of ice were floating across the plains around the town of about 200 people about 30 miles southeast of Sioux City. "Many of the fields are filled with water as far as the eye can see," she said.

continues:  https://weather.com/news/news/2019-03-14-flooding-severe-tornadoes-nebraska-iowa-texas

R.R. Book

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Re: FLOODING (US)
« Reply #181 on: March 15, 2019, 05:30:00 AM »
Many prayers for the well-being of all those in the mid-West who were affected by that storm.  May those who were evacuated be able to return home.  May they enjoy some sunny early spring weather soon, in time to plant their crops.

Yowbarb

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Re: FLOODING (US)
« Reply #182 on: March 17, 2019, 01:03:53 AM »
Many prayers for the well-being of all those in the mid-West who were affected by that storm.  May those who were evacuated be able to return home.  May they enjoy some sunny early spring weather soon, in time to plant their crops.

Amen.

Yowbarb

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Re: FLOODING (US)
« Reply #183 on: March 17, 2019, 01:11:10 AM »
2 hrs ago

Omaha World-Herald

Flooding continues to ravage parts of Nebraska, Iowa; communities brace as water heads downstream

By Erin Duffy, Julie Anderson and Erin Grace / World-Herald staff writers

Let Fremont be a warning.

Floodwaters there cut off all roads in and out of town starting Friday. Two levees were breached Saturday.

So residents know all too well about washed-out roads. They heard the flash flood warnings blaring from cellphones. They left their homes behind and ended up on cots in community centers or churches.

And all that could be an ominous sign of what’s to come in parts of southeastern Nebraska and western Iowa as record-busting water levels continue to push huge torrents of water downstream.

Similar scenarios have played out from Columbus to Wood River to Plattsmouth. Levees breaching. Rivers, lakes and creeks swelling. And people in the way forced to make critical decisions: Should I stay or should I go?

Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts estimated Saturday that one-third of the state has been affected by floods, largely the eastern third. Fifty-two counties and two American Indian tribes have issued emergency declarations in the aftermath of a storm that stretched across the Midwest but hit Nebraska and neighboring areas of South Dakota and Iowa hardest with flooding.

Ricketts and other state officials said people in the path of possible floodwaters should consider leaving pre-emptively — don’t wait to be told to evacuate and risk being trapped or in need of rescue.

In Waterloo, sandwiched between the Elkhorn and Platte Rivers, people were stranded, said a local pastor, Mike Bitter of the Christian Church of Waterloo.

“There is no way out of here unless you’ve got a helicopter — or a boat,” Bitter said.

(Later on Saturday, it wasn’t quite a helicopter that would help some people, but the Union Pacific Railroad, with vehicles that took people in Waterloo and elsewhere along its train lines to safety.)

In Fremont, where the Platte River swelled, evacuees included Cristofer Sanchez, 16, who grabbed clothes, shoes and his PlayStation — “the essentials,” he joked — on Friday. On Saturday, he joined the sandbag line at a flooded stretch of Old Highway 275.

“It hasn’t been stopping,” he said of the water creeping into town. Sanchez is staying with a friend while he’s away from home.

On Friday night, the American Red Cross sheltered almost 900 people, and more shelters opened Saturday. By early Saturday evening, the shelters in Fremont alone counted up to 1,100 people, with more evacuees expected from Snyder, Nebraska. And those numbers don’t capture the swaths of people riding out the flood in hotel rooms or crashing on the couches of family and friends.

Those who decided to evacuate left by plane, train line and automobile. There were departures by boat, by airboat and by massive military vehicles with jacked-up frames capable of cruising through waterlogged roads.

On Saturday afternoon, Union Pacific started transporting people who were evacuating the flooded Waterloo and Valley areas to the safety of Elkhorn. Evacuees were being transported by high-rail vehicles along U.P.’s rail lines to Elkhorn Middle School.

[continued next post]

Yowbarb

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Re: FLOODING (US)
« Reply #184 on: March 17, 2019, 01:57:10 AM »
2 hours ago, Omaha World-Herald article. 100 photos of the record-breaking flooding, in a slideshow on this page:
https://www.omaha.com/multimedia/gallery/photos-major-flooding-hits-nebraska-and-iowa-towns/collection_7242b8cc-38a7-5ddf-9300-a743841b01c3.html
...

https://www.omaha.com/weather/flooding-continues-to-ravage-parts-of-nebraska-iowa-communities-brace/article_2584fb41-05b4-5a0b-ac90-175e253a7cb1.html#comments

Flooding continues to ravage parts of Nebraska, Iowa; communities brace as water heads downstream

With road travel in and out of Fremont still impossible Saturday, some turned to the sunny blue skies, paying for short flights out of the city of 26,000 that became an island surrounded by water.

Some parents who work in Omaha found themselves on the wrong side of the Elkhorn River on Friday, with children in day care or at home on their first day of spring break marooned in Fremont.

So Advanced Air of Council Bluffs ferried children to parents in Omaha. One flight in pilot Nicholas Oliveira’s four-seater Piper Arrow held a 2-year-old and a 4-year-old.

Nebraska should qualify for federal disaster relief
As he toured an emergency shelter in Fremont, Ricketts rattled off sobering statistics: At least one person is dead and two more missing in Nebraska. In Iowa, one person drowned Friday night when a car drove past a barricade and hit water.

Scores of towns have experienced some sort of evacuation. Untold bridges and roads would need to be replaced or shored up. Levees will need to be fixed.

It’s too early to say how much of a hit the state took and what it will cost to rebuild lost homes, businesses, roads and bridges. What seems certain is that the inevitable cleanup will require a massive turnout of workers, residents and volunteers.

Ricketts has said the damage is widespread enough that the state should have no problem qualifying for federal disaster aid.

Both Ricketts and Sen. Ben Sasse, whose own Fremont-area home was taking in water, said Saturday that they had been in contact with President Donald Trump in the past 24 hours. Sasse said he had also spoken to Vice President Mike Pence.

Ricketts said that when he was flying to Fremont, it was hard to tell where the Platte River’s channel was supposed to be. Ricketts offered caution: Don’t drive into water, he said. Don’t do it.

Some law enforcement agencies, including the Omaha Police Department and the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, said they would ticket anyone driving around or through barricades on closed roads.

‘We’re just smashing some records’
Everyone’s still keeping a wary eye on the levels of the Platte and Missouri Rivers.

On the bright side, if you could call it that, the Platte and Elkhorn Rivers were cresting or had crested by Saturday night.

The Platte River at Louisville, Nebraska, was near its expected crest late Saturday afternoon, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and National Weather Service officials said during a conference call with state, local and tribal officials. But the Platte was still well above record levels Saturday night.

Near Columbus, Nebraska, the Loup River has dropped by about 6 feet since yesterday, said Columbus and Platte County Emergency Management Director Tim Hofbauer.

There is no flooding within Columbus, he said. Still, residents have been heavily sandbagging spots, especially near lakes.

But the Missouri River south of Omaha continues to build steam. Major flooding was occurring — or forecast to occur — on the Missouri River between Nebraska City and St. Joseph, Missouri, said Kevin Low, a National Weather Service meteorologist.

Significant stretches of levees from just north of the confluence with the Platte River south to near Rulo, Nebraska, had begun overtopping Saturday afternoon. Several breaches were also reported on the Missouri, including one north of Plattsmouth, one on the Iowa side of the river west of Hamburg, Iowa, and one 3 miles upstream of Brownville, Nebraska.

It could be days before water levels lower on those portions of the Missouri.

By Friday afternoon, the Missouri at Plattsmouth had reached 40.5 feet — well above the previous record of 36.7 feet set during the massive flood in 2011.

The Elkhorn River at Waterloo had crested twice by Saturday, climbing to 24.63 feet Saturday afternoon, 5½ feet higher than the previous record from 1962.

“We’re just smashing some records on the big boys, the Missouri and the Platte,” said National Weather Service meteorologist Jeremy Wesely.

Sandbags and a wiped-out Salvation Army camp
Airmen at Offutt Air Force Base filled up to 100,000 sandbags Friday and Saturday in a last-ditch effort to block floodwaters that are covering much of the southeastern part of the base.

An aerial photo, posted by 55th Wing Commander Col. Michael Manion on his Facebook page, showed that the Missouri River had crept up to the southeast end of Offutt’s single runway. A lake, campground and baseball fields were underwater, and several buildings south of the runway are surrounded. Water was coming toward the Strategic Command gate to the airbase on Capehart Road.

Meanwhile, the Salvation Army’s Gene Eppley Camp, which sits on 118 acres just south of Omaha near U.S. Highway 75, appears to be a total loss after the nearby Platte River flooded.

“Water levels have reached all the way up to the roofs of the cabins and other buildings,” Salvation Army spokesman Todd Andrews said.

About 3,400 people were scheduled to use the camp this year, which for decades has been a year-round camp.

Forecast offers glimmer of hope
It’s not all doom and gloom.

As long as no new ice jams occur, the region will catch a breather over the next few days, with sunshine in the forecast.

But in the long term, the region remains at an elevated risk of flooding because soil is saturated, rivers are high and spring is a rainy time of year.

In a Facebook post on Saturday, Omaha Mayor Jean Stothert said that in Omaha, the Missouri River levee appears to be holding. The projected crest of the river at Omaha on Sunday should be 1½ feet lower than the highest point during the 2011 flood.

“We are monitoring the Omaha levee 24 hours a day by drone and on-site inspections,” she said. “The levee remains safe.”

The Metropolitan Utilities District, which provides water to much of the Omaha area, is monitoring conditions on the Missouri and Platte Rivers as floodwaters rise and spark some concerns about contaminants. The utility said Saturday that drinking water is safe. The City of Lincoln said its water was also safe.

World-Herald staff writers Alia Conley, Steve Liewer, Nancy Gaarder, Rick Ruggles, Susan Szalewski, Alli Davis and Brad Davis contributed to this report.

 +104 Photos: Major flooding hits Nebraska and Iowa towns

https://www.omaha.com/multimedia/gallery/photos-major-flooding-hits-nebraska-and-iowa-towns/collection_7242b8cc-38a7-5ddf-9300-a743841b01c3.html#71

Yowbarb

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Re: FLOODING (US)
« Reply #185 on: March 17, 2019, 02:33:53 AM »
Yowbarb Note: This NWS page has a whole long list of Flood Warnings. Flooding and/or Flood Warnings in these states: WASHINGTON, CALIFORNIA, IDAHO, MONTANA, WYOMING, COLORADO, UTAH, ARIZONA, TEXAS, NEBRASKA,
IOWA, WISCONSIN, SOUTH DAKOTA, KANSAS, MICHIGAN, INDIANA, ILLINOIS, MINNESOTA, MISSOURI, MISSISSIPPI, KENTUCKY, TENNESSEE, LOUISIANA, ARKANSAS, GEORGIA,  SOUTH CAROLINA, NORTH CAROLINA, and other states...
...


https://forecast.weather.gov/wwamap/wwatxtget.php?cwa=usa&wwa=Flood%20Warning

Yowbarb

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Re: FLOODING (US)
« Reply #186 on: March 17, 2019, 02:41:14 AM »
A disturbance will develop near south Florida slide east-
northeast across the Bahamas, along a stalled frontal boundary
Tuesday into early Wednesday morning. It is possible that 1 to 3
inches of rain could fall over the Treasure Coast and Lake
Okeechobee regions, with locally higher amounts along the coast.
this could lead to some minor urban ponding and temporary poor
drainage flooding in these areas

https://forecast.weather.gov/wwamap/wwatxtget.php?cwa=tbw&wwa=hazardous%20weather%20outlook  Hazardous Weather Forecast, boating conditions become dangerous, a disturbance in southern FL moving eastward will dump a lot  of rain and could cause some minor ponding and poor drainage flooding.
...

https://www.wpc.ncep.noaa.gov/basicwx/bawx_nav.php?imgtyp=ndfd&arrval=6&vtime=Tue_12Z&ptime=Tue_00Z&ntime=

Yowbarb

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Re: FLOODING (US)
« Reply #187 on: March 17, 2019, 10:42:23 AM »

R.R. Book

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Re: FLOODING (US)
« Reply #188 on: March 17, 2019, 02:25:01 PM »
Oppenheimer Ranch Project is predicting that water breaching levees in Nebraska will remain on the move and reach St. Louis, and then spill down the Mississippi toward New Orleans...so lots more locations could still be affected.  In addition, more rain is on the way in the area...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K3q6n49pY-s
« Last Edit: March 17, 2019, 02:46:00 PM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: FLOODING (US)
« Reply #189 on: March 19, 2019, 05:44:21 AM »
Dahboo77 "before and after" aerial images of Nebraska flooding:



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OlrKGV_8hV0

R.R. Book

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Re: FLOODING (US)
« Reply #190 on: March 23, 2019, 08:21:05 AM »
ZeroHedge update on aftermath of Midwest flooding:

*Corn and soybean farmers who stored away their harvests from last season, hoping to sell at higher prices on the off-season, instead lost their grains to moisture and swelling, rendering them illegal to sell (such grains harbor deadly aflatoxins).  38% of all the nation's grain supplies in storage from the last harvest was located in the flooded states

*Damage to bridge, rail and road infrastructure is impeding delivery of supplies into the area, as well as impeding the processing and delivery of salvageable products to market out of the area.


How hay deliveries to farmers are being made right now

*The Hormel Food Company's supply chain has been disrupted, meaning that we should expect a disruption to the supply of canned goods to market.

*Large farm machinery not housed in watertight barns is presently mud and waterlogged, and will require time to be repaired.

*Carcasses of drowned livestock are rotting wherever that waters carried them.

*Half of the topsoil had already eroded from previous storms.  Now even more of it is gone.


Book recommended by ZeroHedge article

*This spring's crops will not be plantable now, because the waters will not have receded in time, among other factors.

This means that we already have lost two growing seasons' worth of harvests: last autumn's and this spring's. 

What will sustain existing livestock until a feed surplus is once again established? 

What will happen to farmers unable to make ends meet financially?

What will happen to prices and availability of food at the stores?

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-weather-agriculture/us-farmers-face-devastation-following-midwest-floods-idUSKCN1R12J0

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-03-21/catastrophic-flooding-midwest-could-last-months-threatens-us-food-production
« Last Edit: March 23, 2019, 09:01:38 AM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: FLOODING (US)
« Reply #191 on: March 23, 2019, 12:32:15 PM »
NOAA posted this spring flood prediction on Thursday:


ilinda

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Re: FLOODING (US)
« Reply #192 on: March 23, 2019, 06:34:41 PM »
The recent flooding in the Upper Midwest, such as Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota, and a few others, might not really hit home until later this year when the crops/livestock that would have grown, and would have been in stores, or incorporated into processed foods, are not available.  The sheer amount of losses kind of blow your mind.

R.R. Book

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Re: FLOODING (US)
« Reply #193 on: March 23, 2019, 06:43:56 PM »
It'll be interesting and sobering when they finally finish the grand tally of damage.

Am most of all concerned about the thousands of farmers who, according to reports, have simply given up farming completely.

Many prayers that it won't result in suicides.

 

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