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Surviving the Planet X Tribulation

Author Topic: Fireballs, comets, meteorites, meteors and asteroids  (Read 119501 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: Fireballs, comets, meteorites, meteors and asteroids
« Reply #615 on: November 30, 2018, 10:16:44 PM »

Update this page says the close approach is 0.09 LDs. https://cneos.jpl.nasa.gov/ca/

There have been a few recent close approaches which we did not get much notice on. 0.3, etc.
On Nov 25th 0.3 LDs  lunar distances, considered close.
So now, upcoming on Dec 01, 2018 is a close pass of 0.1 LDs, lunar distances:  2018 WV1
...

MadMax

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Re: Fireballs, comets, meteorites, meteors and asteroids
« Reply #616 on: December 12, 2018, 04:20:13 PM »
As Marshall mentioned in his latest “signs” article, we are starting to encounter the PX “Debris Field” in a major way..

Back-to-back fireballs bolted through Washington’s sky Monday evening

http://strangesounds.org/2018/12/two-fireballs-washington-new-york-east-coast.html

Two bright fireballs lit up the skies Monday evening, widely visible from D.C. to New York. Out of this world!

The first occurred about 4:56 p.m., 10 minutes after sunset in Washington. It illuminated the twilight eastern horizon, burning vibrant shades of green, blue and white as it exploded in our atmosphere. It lasted about five to seven seconds as it fell, fragmenting into a number of smaller shards like a doomed firework.

Other eyewitnesses described it as “like a stray firework,” “green and slow moving,” and “an incredibly bright blue white streaking ball.”

The American Meteor Society received four dozen reports of the spectacle, from Richmond to Providence, R.I. The group synthesized each account, drawing upon information about the meteor’s apparent motion, color, bearing and speed. They concluded that the meteor likely entered Earth’s atmosphere off the southeastern shores of the Delmarva Peninsula, south of Ocean City, before either disintegrating and burning up or crashing into the water somewhere 100 miles to the east-northeast.
"Ignorance is Bliss" - (Agent Smith the first Matrix Movie)

R.R. Book

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Re: Fireballs, comets, meteorites, meteors and asteroids
« Reply #617 on: December 12, 2018, 05:04:57 PM »
Since we don't know how long it will take for the debris tail to pass, nor how many passes we may experience, it might be a good idea to turn our attention toward fire-proofing our homes or bug-out locations. 

Those in the South whose garden faucets don't need to be disconnected for the winter might want to keep their hoses connected and ready to use at a moment's notice. 

Those in the North won't have that option, as hoses must be disconnected to prevent pipes from bursting inside the wall.  However, it might be worthwhile to ask a plumber about the newer flexible stems.  Might they withstand certain temps?

Where a hose won't reach, maybe rainwater barrels?

It also might be a good idea to evaluate one's property for a fire-break.  Can trees or brush be cut back further?

How about patrolling the property regularly, or at least scanning it frequently, to spot any sign of fire potentially caused by falling space debris?

Other ideas?

ilinda

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Re: Fireballs, comets, meteorites, meteors and asteroids
« Reply #618 on: December 13, 2018, 03:55:08 PM »
As Marshall mentioned in his latest “signs” article, we are starting to encounter the PX “Debris Field” in a major way..
Thanks for posting this, Max, as I had missed this little tidbit.  It's not little and is critically important.  Thanks again.

ilinda

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Re: Fireballs, comets, meteorites, meteors and asteroids
« Reply #619 on: December 13, 2018, 04:01:50 PM »
Since we don't know how long it will take for the debris tail to pass, nor how many passes we may experience, it might be a good idea to turn our attention toward fire-proofing our homes or bug-out locations. 

Other ideas?
I know this sounds bizarre and would certainly look so, but this idea has rolled around in my head for several years:  Hang tin roofing panels side by side, all across the front, sides and back of frame buildings.  If you cannot cover all of them, then move your very most important items into one building (if all are frame) and then literally cover the exterior with metal roofing panels.

Steel will work, but costs more, and the really old tin barn roofing works too, plus the newer "tin" roofing which seems to be less tin, and less lead, and more aluminum and/or steel would also do the trick.  It might be worth while to experiment now to determine if it's better to just hang the panels or actually attach them, top and bottom.

So far, I haven't heard of any fires having been started by falling space debris, but the potential is surely there.

R.R. Book

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Re: Fireballs, comets, meteorites, meteors and asteroids
« Reply #620 on: December 13, 2018, 04:09:45 PM »
Great idea, as metal roofing panels are pretty inexpensive (it's the labor that's the expensive part of a metal roof).

Hope you wear thick gloves to handle the panels!  :)

Jimfarmer

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Re: Fireballs, comets, meteorites, meteors and asteroids
« Reply #621 on: December 13, 2018, 10:47:13 PM »
Quote
Hang tin roofing panels side by side, all across the front, sides and back of frame buildings.

Might attract lightening?

R.R. Book

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Re: Fireballs, comets, meteorites, meteors and asteroids
« Reply #622 on: December 14, 2018, 04:31:34 AM »
Good point - would probably need grounded rods...

ilinda

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Re: Fireballs, comets, meteorites, meteors and asteroids
« Reply #623 on: December 14, 2018, 01:59:23 PM »
Yes, they could attract lightening, although probably not more than a conventional steel-sided and steel-roofed barn.  Still, since they will be touching each other, good idea to attach one of them to a ground rod, driven 8' into the earth.

MadMax

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Re: Fireballs, comets, meteorites, meteors and asteroids
« Reply #624 on: December 15, 2018, 07:34:33 AM »
Time to head underground !!

Seismic Sensors Triggered By Gigantic Fireball’s Explosion Over Greenland!!

http://www.shtfplan.com/headline-news/seismic-sensors-triggered-by-fireballs-explosion-over-greenland_12132018

A fireball that exploded over Greenland shook the planet so much that it triggered seismic sensors to go off.  The event occurred back on July 25, but it was the first ever meteor to shake the Earth so violently that it caused a seismic event.

At approximately 8:00 p.m. local time on that day, residents of the town of Qaanaaq on Greenland’s northwestern coast reported seeing a bright light in the sky and feeling the ground shake as a meteor combusted over the nearby Thule Air Base, according to Live Science. That phenomenal event was detected by more than just human observers though.

    A fireball was detected over Greenland on July 25, 2018 by US Government sensors at an altitude of 43.3 km. The energy from the explosion is estimated to be 2.1 kilotons. pic.twitter.com/EePuk14Pqd

    — Rocket Ron 🚀 (@RonBaalke) July 31, 2018

According to unpublished research presented on December 12 at the annual conference of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), that fleeting event triggered a seismic reaction.

    Seismographic equipment, which had been installed near Qaanaaq just a few months earlier to monitor how ground shaking affected the ice, also recorded the fiery meteor blast. The Qaanaaq fireball provided scientists with the first evidence of how an icy environment — and, possibly, a distant ice-covered world — could respond to a meteor impact.

    The first sign of the meteor was a brilliant flash in the sky over Greenland; the meteor was at its brightest at an altitude of approximately 27 miles (43 kilometers) above the ground, and it was traveling at nearly 54,000 mph (87,000 km/h), according to the International Meteor Organization (IMO). –Live Science

Many who witnessed the meteor’s explosion over Greenland said it was like a bomb going off, and the seismic measurements agreed. With a calculated impact energy of 2.1 kilotons of TNT, this blast was the second-most-energetic fireball of the year, Live Science previously reported.

The recordings were captured by the seismic sensors and interpreted by two Danish Seismological Network broadband stations in Greenland: TULEG (Station Thule) and NEEM (Station Eemian). Seismic equipment picked up tremors from the impact location as far as 218 miles (350 km) away. The scientists were then able to identify the seismic event that matched the arc of the traveling ground waves and estimate the impact point of the fireball, the researchers reported at AGU. Scientists were then able to pinpoint the epicenter of the event near Humboldt glacier on the Greenland ice sheet. fireball that exploded over Greenland shook the planet so much that it triggered seismic sensors to go off.  The event occurred back on July 25, but it was the first ever meteor to shake the Earth so violently that it caused a seismic event.

At approximately 8:00 p.m. local time on that day, residents of the town of Qaanaaq on Greenland’s northwestern coast reported seeing a bright light in the sky and feeling the ground shake as a meteor combusted over the nearby Thule Air Base, according to Live Science. That phenomenal event was detected by more than just human observers though.

    A fireball was detected over Greenland on July 25, 2018 by US Government sensors at an altitude of 43.3 km. The energy from the explosion is estimated to be 2.1 kilotons. pic.twitter.com/EePuk14Pqd

    — Rocket Ron 🚀 (@RonBaalke) July 31, 2018

According to unpublished research presented on December 12 at the annual conference of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), that fleeting event triggered a seismic reaction.

    Seismographic equipment, which had been installed near Qaanaaq just a few months earlier to monitor how ground shaking affected the ice, also recorded the fiery meteor blast. The Qaanaaq fireball provided scientists with the first evidence of how an icy environment — and, possibly, a distant ice-covered world — could respond to a meteor impact.

    The first sign of the meteor was a brilliant flash in the sky over Greenland; the meteor was at its brightest at an altitude of approximately 27 miles (43 kilometers) above the ground, and it was traveling at nearly 54,000 mph (87,000 km/h), according to the International Meteor Organization (IMO). –Live Science

Many who witnessed the meteor’s explosion over Greenland said it was like a bomb going off, and the seismic measurements agreed. With a calculated impact energy of 2.1 kilotons of TNT, this blast was the second-most-energetic fireball of the year, Live Science previously reported.

The recordings were captured by the seismic sensors and interpreted by two Danish Seismological Network broadband stations in Greenland: TULEG (Station Thule) and NEEM (Station Eemian). Seismic equipment picked up tremors from the impact location as far as 218 miles (350 km) away. The scientists were then able to identify the seismic event that matched the arc of the traveling ground waves and estimate the impact point of the fireball, the researchers reported at AGU. Scientists were then able to pinpoint the epicenter of the event near Humboldt glacier on the Greenland ice sheet.
"Ignorance is Bliss" - (Agent Smith the first Matrix Movie)

 

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