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Author Topic: Bad water situations due to human error - 2016  (Read 8614 times)

steedy

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Re: Major screwup with the water in West Virginia
« Reply #15 on: April 25, 2014, 06:18:59 AM »
I didn't even know you had this topic!  I live in a county that borders the counties affected by that spill.  Maybe you haven't heard that even now lots of people in that area won't drink the water, or shower, do dishes, wash clothes in it.  They've been told it's ok to drink, but don't bathe in it.  They've been told it's safe now, but their water still smells like licorice.  They've had to close schools periodically because the smell comes back.

They are still looking into the spill, but it's been a couple weeks since I've heard about schools closing or the smell.  Still, I don't blame them for not drinking or using their water.  I don't think it's safe either.  I've been waiting for someone to discover that the spill has now mixed in with other rivers.  Also, I can't remember the original number given about how much was spilled, but it was a week or two later that it was discovered the amount was well beyond what had been reported.

It was nice that people around the country donated water to the area, but that stopped a couple months ago.  I think this will be a long term, if not permanent, problem down there.  Even I cancelled a trip to Charleston to avoid the water.  It's pretty sad.  Lots of people want to move, but can't afford it.

Yowbarb

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Re: Major screwup with the water in West Virginia
« Reply #16 on: April 26, 2014, 11:53:21 PM »
I didn't even know you had this topic!  I live in a county that borders the counties affected by that spill.  Maybe you haven't heard that even now lots of people in that area won't drink the water, or shower, do dishes, wash clothes in it.  They've been told it's ok to drink, but don't bathe in it.  They've been told it's safe now, but their water still smells like licorice.  They've had to close schools periodically because the smell comes back.

They are still looking into the spill, but it's been a couple weeks since I've heard about schools closing or the smell.  Still, I don't blame them for not drinking or using their water.  I don't think it's safe either.  I've been waiting for someone to discover that the spill has now mixed in with other rivers.  Also, I can't remember the original number given about how much was spilled, but it was a week or two later that it was discovered the amount was well beyond what had been reported.

It was nice that people around the country donated water to the area, but that stopped a couple months ago.  I think this will be a long term, if not permanent, problem down there.  Even I cancelled a trip to Charleston to avoid the water.  It's pretty sad.  Lots of people want to move, but can't afford it.
steedy thanks for posting more info here...
Yes I had heard a lot of people don't trust the all-clears they hear. It really is a tragedy. Also if they really they are not getting donations of water anymore - that's just awful...

steedy

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Re: Major screwup with the water in West Virginia
« Reply #17 on: April 27, 2014, 08:37:00 AM »
I know there are those people out there who just love conspiracies, and even make them up if they have to.  And, being that this happened in WV, I'm surprised someone hasn't come up with a conspiracy theory about it.  Maybe in a couple more months there will be a conspiracy theory.  But I think it wasn't a plot from the government to try to rid the country of people in this region.  Just putting it out there now before anyone says differently.  ;D

Yowbarb

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Re: Major screwup with the water in West Virginia
« Reply #18 on: May 13, 2014, 03:58:09 AM »
Something stinks here...... :-X
The last think I read on it was the tap water in a lot of homes still had that licorice smell and they couldn't stomach drinking it. Also still afraid to drink it...

Yowbarb

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Bad water situations due to human error - 2016
« Reply #19 on: January 12, 2016, 01:16:29 PM »
Yowbarb Note: Been watching the coverage on the water situation in Michigan. The new Mayor of Flint, Karen Weaver has been pushing for more to be done. Now the Governor declared a state of Emergency.  Mayor Weaver pushed hard for investigations and is asking  Federal help in sorting it all out so justice will be done. She has issued statement that the lead poisoning from the bad water (an unnecessary situation caused by human error) has caused irreversible brain and leaning disabilities for a lot of local children. Now, all the children will be tested for the lead. The situation has gone on a long time... Articles will give more details. The situation is, someone (?) decided to change the public water source without consulting voters or perhaps without proper scientific testing so the water source is badly contaminated with lead and other toxins. It is not even safe to brush one's teeth with. Governor now issuing statements do not even touch that water and teams are giving out water door to door. Looks like a belated response though, and a lot of harm has been done.
Update: A Federal Investigation IS being done.
...
SEE VIDEO this page: http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/11/health/toxic-tap-water-flint-michigan/index.html

How tap water became toxic in Flint, Michigan

By Sara Ganim and Linh Tran, CNN
Updated 9:23 AM ET, Tue January 12, 2016

(CNN)—Flint, Michigan, lies about 70 miles from the shores of the largest group of fresh water bodies in the world: the Great Lakes. Yet its residents can't get clean water from their taps.

Nearly two years ago, the state decided to save money by switching Flint's water supply from Lake Huron (which they were paying the city of Detroit for), to the Flint River, a notorious tributary that runs through town known to locals for its filth.

"We thought it was a joke," said Rhonda Kelso, a long-time Flint resident. "People my age and older, thought 'They're not going to do that.' "

The switch was made during a financial state of emergency for the ever-struggling industrial town. It was supposed to be temporary while a new state-run supply line to Lake Huron was ready for connection. The project was estimated to take about two years.

Soon after the switch, the water started to look, smell and taste funny. Residents said it often looked dirty.

"The water would come in brown and my daughter was like 'Mom ... why is the water brown?' "

Kelso thought it was sewage, but it was actually iron. The Flint River is highly corrosive: 19 times more so than the Lake Huron supply, according to researchers from Virginia Tech.

According to a class-action lawsuit, the state Department of Environmental Quality wasn't treating the Flint River water with an anti-corrosive agent, in violation of federal law. Therefore, the water was eroding the iron water mains, turning water brown.

But what residents couldn't see was far worse. About half of the service lines to homes in Flint are made of lead and because the water wasn't properly treated, lead began leaching into the water supply, in addition to the iron.

This had been the status quo for nearly two years, and until September, city and state officials told worried residents that everything was fine. Former Flint Mayor Dayne Walling even drank it on local TV to make the point.

But in August, a group of skeptical researchers from Virginia Tech came up and did in-home testing and found elevated levels of lead in the drinking water and made those findings public. State officials insisted their own research was more accurate.

"You're paying for poison. I'm paying for water that's a toxic waste," Kelso said. She and her daughter and four other families are now part of a class-action lawsuit that alleges not only lead poisoning but several medical conditions resulting from contaminated water after the switch. CNN sought responses from all the defendants, and many did not respond.

Later it became publicly known that federal law had not been followed. A 2011 study on the Flint River found it would have to be treated with an anti-corrosive agent for it to be considered as a safe source for drinking water.

Adding that agent would have cost about $100 a day, and experts say 90% of the problems with Flint's water would have been avoided.

But Flint residents say they were kept in the dark for 18 months until a local doctor took things into her own hands.

The hero doctor

Yowbarb

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Re: Bad water situations due to human error - 2016
« Reply #20 on: January 12, 2016, 01:35:27 PM »
Yowbarb Note: Disgraceful situations in Flint about bad water.
Don't blame the Mayor of Flint. She is newly-elected and been pushing for investigations and to get the situation handled. Now that a State of Emergency has finally been declared by the Governor of Michigan, FEMA sent more than 7,000 gallons of water to Flint, MI. It is being distributed by city workers and volunteers.
...

THOUSANDS OF CHILDREN POISONED: FLINT MICHIGAN DECLARES EMERGENCY  9:27

video link: https://youtu.be/jWURzvVOU4w

Published on Jan 10, 2016

FLINT, Mich. — A caravan of Genesee County sheriff’s office cruisers snaked its way through the streets here on Thursday, doling out water filters and jugs of water to frustrated and terrified residents who have been trying to cope for more than a year with the public health crisis that has been flowing out of their taps.

Shortly after officials switched the source of their drinking water to the Flint River from Lake Huron in April 2014 to save money, residents started complaining that their tap water looked strange, tasted bad and caused rashes. But not until the fall of 2015, when the water was found to have elevated levels of lead that were reflected in children’s blood, did state officials swing into action.

Now they are scrambling to address a situation that has endangered the health of Flint’s children and generated untold costs and anxiety.
“It’s ridiculous we have to live in such a way,” said Colette Brown, a Flint native who months ago stopped drinking tap water. She said the filter at her home needed a replacement cartridge.

“Put yourself in our shoes,” she said. “It’s hurting kids, the elderly. It’s hurting all of us.”
And there was plenty of blame to go around, she added. “It’s almost like a stepladder — you start from the top and you go all the way down to the bottom,” she said.

Switching the source of drinking water was meant to relieve some of the financial pressures on this struggling city. Flint has high rates of gun violence and crumbling infrastructure. And as manufacturing jobs have moved overseas, the population has steadily dropped to fewer than 100,000 — more than 40 percent of whom live below the poverty line.
But it was not long before some in Flint were pointing out the nasty color and odor of what was coming out of their taps, and digging into their wallets to buy bottled water for drinking and cooking, and baby wipes for bathing.

State and city leaders had largely dismissed residents’ complaints for months, assuring them that the water was safe and being tested regularly. With the emergence of the blood level data, officials began advising residents not to drink unfiltered tap water — a recommendation that remains in effect.

In October, Gov. Rick Snyder helped orchestrate a switch back to Lake Huron water. Though Mayor Karen Weaver called that a positive step, she said the change did not undo corrosion damage from the river water that caused pipes to leach lead.
As of last month, the state had identified 43 people with elevated lead levels in their blood. Lead is toxic, and can cause stunted development in children.

Last month, the governor apologized to residents. On Tuesday he declared the city to be in a state of emergency — the same day that federal officials said they had opened an investigation into the water contamination. And in October, Mr. Snyder announced a state plan to distribute free water filters and provide water testing to residents. But many residents remain unsatisfied.

“Their one job was to make sure our water was safe,” Melissa Mays, a Flint resident, said of Michigan environmental officials. Ms. Mays, who has helped organize protests and been among the most outspoken critics of the water situation, said she worried about how the water might be affecting her young sons’ health.
“They cut every corner,” she said. “They did more to cover up than actually fix it. That’s criminal.”

In a scathing initial report last month, a task force appointed by Mr. Snyder found that the State Department of Environmental Quality’s response to health concerns “was often one of aggressive dismissal, belittlement and attempts to discredit these efforts and the individuals involved.” That approach, the report added, was “completely unacceptable.”

« Last Edit: January 12, 2016, 01:54:36 PM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Yowbarb

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Re: Bad water situations due to human error - 2016
« Reply #22 on: January 13, 2016, 01:02:50 AM »
Child protesting the poisoned drinking water in her town. Flint Michigan, January 2916

Yowbarb

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Re: Bad water situations due to human error - 2016
« Reply #23 on: January 26, 2016, 02:39:35 AM »
AFP 4 hours ago:

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/lead-poisoning-strikes-another-us-town/ar-BBoG9jO?ocid=spartanntp

Lead poisoning strikes another US town

A lead poisoning scandal has struck a second US town, with schools closed in Sebring, Ohio Monday and the water treatment plant operator accused of falsifying reports.

Initial tests found elevated lead levels in 28 homes and one school in the midwestern village of about 4,400 people, Ohio's environmental protection agency said. It is not clear how long lead has been leaking from the town's pipes.

The agency said in a statement it has "reason to suspect that the operator falsified reports" and has asked the federal Environmental Protection Agency's criminal division for help with the investigation.

The Ohio agency did not specify what kind of reports it was referring to. A spokesperson for it was not immediately available for comment.

The Ohio case comes as a special prosecutor was appointed to investigate how the city of Flint, Michigan exposed 100,000 residents to lead poisoning after cutting water treatment costs.

Officials are accused of ignoring months of health warnings about foul-smelling water, even as residents complained that it was making them sick.

President Barack Obama weighed in on the Flint crisis last week, saying he would be "beside myself" if the health of his children had been placed at risk in such a way.

"You can't short-change basic services that we provide to our people," Obama said.

Lead exposure is harmful to everyone, but it can have devastating impacts on young children by irreversibly harming brain development. It has been shown to lower intelligence, stunt growth and lead to aggressive and anti-social behavior.

Ohio's environmental protection agency issued a warning on December
3 about lead contamination in the Sebring water supply.

It issued a notice of violation to the village on Thursday after learning officials "had failed to properly notify its customers" and repeatedly failed to "provide timely and accurate information to the department's field office."

"It has become apparent that our field office was too patient in dealing with the village of Sebring's 'cat and mouse' game and should have had closer scrutiny on the water system meeting its deadlines," Ohio EPA Director Craig Butler said.

"We are in the process of developing new protocols and appropriate personnel
actions to ensure that our field staff takes action when it appears that a water system is not complying and taking their review seriously."

Changes already made to the way the village treats its water have helped reduce corrosion in the pipes, the agency said. However, the water advisory will not be lifted until the village achieves two rounds of lead-free sampling in consecutive six month periods.

Pregnant women and children were asked to have their blood tested for elevated lead levels on Sunday and officials have also begun distributing bottled water and filtration systems.

enlightenme

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Re: Bad water situations due to human error - 2016
« Reply #24 on: January 26, 2016, 02:47:19 AM »
OMG! Another town with lead poisoning the water!!  What is wrong with our local governments??  Oh my, I'm truly a bit at a loss for words, thanks for the info Barb!

Yowbarb

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Re: Bad water situations due to human error - 2016
« Reply #25 on: January 26, 2016, 03:00:09 AM »
OMG! Another town with lead poisoning the water!!  What is wrong with our local governments??  Oh my, I'm truly a bit at a loss for words, thanks for the info Barb!
Yes, that's a bad situation. Image farther below: Child in Flint MI who was bathed in the water in his home, lead poisoning Jan 2016
2016/01/21/ Regina Boone photographer -Time Magazine

There may be some kind of fines and prosecutions before this is all sorted out.
Maybe Congressional Hearings on this too?
Infrastructure crumbling ... Also Governors cannot just be careless and ignore what is being reported up to their level. I watched an interview on TV (several) one Representative had emailed the Governor of Michigan over a year ago about levels of lead and barely got any response... The Governor did not meet with the MI Representative (House).
« Last Edit: January 26, 2016, 03:23:01 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Bad water situations due to human error - 2016
« Reply #26 on: January 26, 2016, 03:30:03 AM »
PS It does seem like the Governor of Michigan has been dragging his feel...Former Mayor and other officials maybe culpable too. Meanwhile there is a Class Action Lawsuit by citizens of Flint...and lots of heat now from the Federal level...

Yowbarb

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Re: Bad water situations due to human error - 2016
« Reply #27 on: September 18, 2016, 11:38:55 PM »
Yowbarb Note: This headline was posted already by Jimfarmer in his NEWS Topic. I just thought it worthwhile to post this story here too, to help get the word out.
Do I fully understand this? No. Not sure why the water is radioactive...
...

https://www.earthfiles.com/

September 17, 2016 -   215 Million Gallons of Radioactive Water Have Leaked Into Major Florida Aquifer Through Huge Sinkhole.

New Wales Mosaic fertilizer plant in Mulberry, Florida, 30 miles straight east of Tampa, has discovered a sinkhole 45 feet in diameter opened up in “the liner system at the base of a phosophogypsum stack residue from the processing of phosphate to make fertilizers and drained into the Floridian aquifer” threatening water supplies for millions of Florida residents. But Mosaic “began pumping water out of the west cell where the massive sinkhole opened up and is holding that water in an alternative holding area on site to reduce the amount of (radioactive) drainage into the aquifer.” What caused the big sinkhole is still unknown.

Yowbarb

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Re: Bad water situations due to human error - 2016
« Reply #28 on: September 26, 2016, 12:34:30 AM »
Video on this page:

http://www.cnn.com/videos/health/2016/09/19/sinkhole-toxic-drinking-water-florida-pkg.wfla

Massive sinkhole threatens drinking water
A giant sinkhole allowed millions of gallons of contaminated water to flow into a Florida aquifer.Source: WFLA

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