Win-Win Survival Communities The Kolbrin Bible Complete Danjeon Breathing System Radio Free Earth

Author Topic: Surviving animal attacks  (Read 4758 times)

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Surviving animal attacks
« on: June 05, 2014, 05:49:44 PM »
Yowbarb Note: This article is found in Prepared For That website, a wealth of information.
...

http://preparedforthat.com/preventing-surviving-bear-attack/

Preventing and Surviving a Bear Attack


September 29, 2013 by Josh

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Surviving animal attacks
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2014, 11:30:21 AM »
This just randomly popped into my head, looking at this Topic title...
I am not an expert in cattle prods nor do I know the best deal to get one.

This type will not hold the charge, once used, to avoid electrical hazard. Battery operated.
Looks like it extends out and could be kept in a backpack to ward off four legged creatures of all types and the two legged variety also.
...
Syrvet Livestock Prod - from ValleyVet.com  They are based in Marysville, Kansas



http://www.valleyvet.com/zoomimage.html?img=swatches/21925_L_vvs_000.jpg

steedy

  • Guest
Re: Surviving animal attacks
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2014, 07:45:02 AM »
I have often wondered what I'd do if a bear came in too close to my property.  The bears in this area are occasionally coming into town for a couple days now, so I think it's just a matter of time before I encounter one.  Especially once I get chickens.  I've always heard raising your arms to look bigger will scare them off, but I think keeping a gun nearby won't be a bad idea.  I'd much rather shoot it over the bear to scare it away than to shoot the bear directly.

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Surviving animal attacks
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2014, 03:15:18 PM »
I have often wondered what I'd do if a bear came in too close to my property.  The bears in this area are occasionally coming into town for a couple days now, so I think it's just a matter of time before I encounter one.  Especially once I get chickens.  I've always heard raising your arms to look bigger will scare them off, but I think keeping a gun nearby won't be a bad idea.  I'd much rather shoot it over the bear to scare it away than to shoot the bear directly.

I know what you mean. I wouldn't get much joy from shooting a bear. Of course if it were close to a survival camp and I was protecting family, kids grandkids and it seemed necessary - yes a warning shot and if that didn't do it, well then that bear would be toast.

steedy

  • Guest
Re: Surviving animal attacks
« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2014, 05:29:27 PM »
I know.  I love bears.  I think they're cute!  Especially black bears!

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Surviving animal attacks
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2014, 09:51:55 PM »
I know.  I love bears.  I think they're cute!  Especially black bears!
:)

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Surviving animal attacks
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2019, 02:35:43 PM »
Tips On Surviving Wild Animal Attacks  12:21  10,702 views

https://youtu.be/twazde7dzAk

Epic Wildlife
Jul 9, 2018




ilinda

  • Guest
Re: Surviving animal attacks
« Reply #7 on: November 26, 2019, 12:00:46 PM »
(Editor's Note:  we've talked about feral/wild hogs on the TH before, but cannot find that thread.  This particular article isn't about surviving, but it is certainly food for thought after the horrible attack on a woman in a Texas town early one morning.)


Woman killed by feral hogs outside Texas home: ‘One of the worst things I had ever seen’

https://www.yahoo.com/news/woman-killed-feral-hogs-outside-121726181.html
U.S.
Woman killed by feral hogs outside Texas home: ‘One of the worst things I had ever seen’
 Adrianna Rodriguez, USA TODAY,USA TODAY 3 hours ago

A woman was attacked and killed by a group of feral hogs Sunday morning outside the southeastern Texas home where she worked as a caretaker, authorities said.
Chambers County Sheriff Brian Hawthorne said in a press conference Monday that Christine Rollins, 59, arrived around 6 or 6:30 a.m. when she was attacked at the Anahuac home, 40 miles east of Houston.
The 84-year-old woman who has been under her care for almost two years went outside and found Rollins in the front yard between her car and the front door, Hawthorne told reporters.
The sheriff said Rollins had a severe head wound and several other injuries consistent with different size bites, indicating multiple animals were involved.  
Hawthorne said detectives are still trying to determine whether Rollins fell because of a medical condition, and whether the fall caused her head injury, or whether the animals made her fall.
“In my 35 years, it was one of the worst things I had ever seen,” Hawthorne said about the scene.
The coroner in neighboring Jefferson County ruled Monday that Rollins bled to death after an attack by feral hogs.
Hawthorne told reporters that feral hogs have been a problem in the county and throughout the state of Texas. But incidents like this are rare.
“Just from what little research we have found, there is less than six of these that have been reported in the nation over the very many years in reporting these kind of deaths," he said.

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Surviving animal attacks
« Reply #8 on: November 28, 2019, 08:52:08 PM »
ilinda thanks for posting. I feel it is an important thing to know, that wild, feral hogs can kill people.
Important to have some kind of fence around the home, and a gate a person can drive in and out of, even if it is a huge acreage, because this will discourage the stray and predatory animals from getting right up to you  when you are working in front of your home, or you or visitors and entering and leaving.

In a lot of western-type movies there was often a little fenced area around the home. Big geese were often running loose defending the area. It gets a bit more complex if you want to be safe getting in and out of your car so ideally a gated driveway - and even better - a driveway gate that you open automatically.

Barb Note: Noe of these fences or gates would truly work in a SHTF scenario, but they would for now, at least affording protection against wild animals invading the area up close to your home.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/26/us/texas-woman-killed-feral-hogs.html
« Last Edit: November 28, 2019, 09:18:46 PM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Surviving animal attacks
« Reply #9 on: November 28, 2019, 09:11:38 PM »
Feral Pigs 01 - Dangerous Animals

https://youtu.be/K0-x15Q0Yfs

Sep 25, 2012

ojatro
823K subscribers

http://Ojatro.com
http://Ojatroblog.blogspot.com
Escaped domestic pigs readily become feral, causing problems to the environment in many ways. These wild hogs cause damage to trees and other vegetation, consume agricultural crops, feed on the eggs of ground-nesting birds and turtles, and can carry disease. Feral hogs can rapidly increase their population. A sow can have up to 10 offspring per litter, and is able to have two litters per year. Each piglet reaches sexual maturity at 6 months of age. Feral hogs often interbreed with wild boar, producing descendants similar in appearance to wild boar.
The problematic nature of feral pigs has caused several states in the U.S. to declare feral hogs to be an invasive species. Often, these states will have greatly reduced (or even non-existent) hunting regulations regarding feral hogs. In Missouri, no hunting permit is required for the taking of wild boar; hunters may take as many as they like with any weapon. Caution is advised, as feral pigs can become aggressive and use their tusks defensively. Hog hunters consider them extremely dangerous when injured or cornered.
Category

R.R. Book

  • Members
  • Prolific Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9293
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Surviving animal attacks
« Reply #10 on: November 29, 2019, 09:30:45 AM »
Even a single goose running around loose can be quite a deterrent.  For my first job in high school (other than odd jobs like babysitting or transcribing audio tapes for the pastor), I worked for an older woman who had a business behind her home, and I always had to get past the goose first.  I can't remember how many times I was nipped by it... ::)


Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Surviving animal attacks
« Reply #11 on: November 29, 2019, 06:09:59 PM »
Even a single goose running around loose can be quite a deterrent.  For my first job in high school (other than odd jobs like babysitting or transcribing audio tapes for the pastor), I worked for an older woman who had a business behind her home, and I always had to get past the goose first.  I can't remember how many times I was nipped by it... ::)


Geese are a deterrent for sure. Too bad they nip at friend and foe alike. :)

Siamese cats are an interesting breed. I read they form a strong bond with their owner(s).
Years ago I used to watch Animal Miracles. Still watch the reruns sometimes.
I've learned a lot.
There was one episode, which I am looking for to post.
Here's how the story goes:

A woman was alone in her lovely big home. Her husband was away on business.  The only one with her was her big, purebred male Siamese cat.
The woman heard a sound downstairs which woke her up, she was concerned so immediately got up and approached her door, probably to lock it. She suddenly hear the most horrific yowling sound and then a man yelling in pain. She rushed out just in time to see her Siamese cat up on the mans face and arms scratching him and yowling at him fiercely. The intruder was attempting to run down the stairs, with the woman's big Siamese cat in hot pursuit. He ran in terror out the front door, and she quickly ran and shut and locked the door and called the police.
The woman was astounded that her big purebred male Siamese "had it in him" to do such a thing, to fight so fiercely.

The narrator of the show, the late Alan Thicke said that Siamese cats were actually bred to be the last line of defense for the emperors of Siam. An emperor would have their palace guards, their weapons, and in the inner sanctum of their rooms, they had curtains around their beds. Inside the curtained area, where they slept they kept 1 or 2 guard cats. The Siamese. :)
...

https://www.petplan.com.au/blog/cat/a-history-of-cats-siamese/ 

A History of Cats: Siamese

September 13th, 2018

The Siamese cat is thought to have originated from Siam (present day Thailand). It is believed that the cats were sacred and were used as guards of ancient temples. They were exclusive to the Royalty of Siam. It is said that the Royal cat of Siam is a product of a mating between the “Egyptian cat” and “wild cat” of Siam.

There are many legends surrounding Siamese cats and the Royal Family, explaining how the cat became cross eyed with a kinked tail. One such legend tells a story of a Siamese temple cat who went in search for a missing royal goblet with his wife. Once the goblet was found, the male went to alarm the King whilst the female stayed to protect it. She was so scared of losing it that she wrapped her tail around the base tightly and stared at until her eyes crossed and her tail kinked.

Another story states that there was once a Siamese Princess who was afraid of loosing her jewelry whilst bathing in a river one day. Her dear cat kinked his tail for her so that she could place them on the tail safely. Since then, all Siamese cats were born with this kink in order to guard princesses’ rings.

It is however recorded that, in 1884 the departing British Consul-General Gould was given a Siamese cat by the Siamese king as a farewell gift. It was considered a great honour as the cat came from those bred in the palace by the royal family. The cats caught the attention of the public as nothing like they had ever seen before. There was a famous quote from the time describing them as an “unnatural nightmare of a cat”. But that did not stop them becoming one of the favourite cats of the British cat fanciers. By 1902 England founded its first Siamese cat fancier’s club.

R.R. Book

  • Members
  • Prolific Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9293
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Surviving animal attacks
« Reply #12 on: November 30, 2019, 06:48:53 AM »

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Surviving animal attacks
« Reply #13 on: November 30, 2019, 12:37:06 PM »
HA HA !   That is a little scary   :o     :o      ;D

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Surviving animal attacks
« Reply #14 on: November 30, 2019, 12:38:28 PM »
BTW (my disclaimer, haha) I am not saying a Siamese cat will protect you from animal attacks - (This topic about animal attacks)  ;D

Personally, I will try the keep a Siamese as a last line of defense against predatory humans...
Most of my cats are part Siamese but no purebred guard cats yet.  ;D


 

Home Study System

Home Study System
Save 30%

BUY NOW

The ideal win-win survival community library reference system offers a broad range of valuable survival skills and knowledge. Ideal those in preparedness, it provides in-depth knowledge about how to form communities and operate two-way communications.

For human needs, it also includes a low-impact energy self-healing art and an essential role for seniors in survival communities.

A special note for those of you living outside the United States, we optimized this system for the lowest possible Priority Mail costs.

4 Paperbacks and 6 DVDs

Win-Win Survival Communities Signed

Radio Free Earth Color (Color Editon) Signed

Complete Danjeon Breathing System w/6 DVDs

Survival Wellness Advocacy and the BIG WIN

BUY NOW