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Author Topic: what is 'survival food' / what to think of  (Read 46992 times)

ilinda

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #240 on: March 25, 2019, 07:53:45 PM »
Solani, I am also super impressed with your jars and jars of dried puffball mushroom!  Truly impressive size also.  And I have neve seen one so large that was not already "going bad".

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #241 on: May 05, 2019, 04:59:49 PM »
We've briefly discussed a dandelion coffee substitute in the past, and I considered whether to bring it up again under the "Survival Food" thread or under "Alternative Medicine," of which it is both.

Am now regarding it as a survival food with medicinal benefits, rather than the other way around, and when mixed with hot water and a little dry milk from storage, it becomes a comfort food as well.

I've put coffee at the bottom of my list of preps, even though I know how important it is to the menfolk in our household, and although it does have some medicinal qualities.  On the other hand, for less $ than coffee, am putting dandelion coffee substitute near the top as a food, medicine and comfort item.

An independent lab (Chemical Solutions Ltd.) found the following nutritional content in a 2.8g (1 tsp) serving of Dandyblend (made from dandelion roots + four other plants):

Major Minerals:
Potassium 22.2 mg
Sodium 3.2 mg
Phosphorus 2.8 mg
Magnesium 2.0 mg
Calcium 2.1 mg
Iron 0.9 mg
Aluminum 0.05mg
Manganese 0.03

Trace Minerals:
Rubidium 12.0 mcg
Zinc 8.6 mcg
Barium 6.0 mcg
Boron 4.0 mcg
Copper 1.6 mcg
Strontium 2.0 mcg
Chromium 2.0 mcg
Titanium 2.0 mcg

In addition:
Phytochemical list for dandelion roots:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dandelion_coffee

Sesquiterpene lactones

    Taraxacin (a digestive bitter and diuretic)
    Phenylpropanoid glycosides: dihydroconiferin, syringin, and dihydrosyringin (detergent-like sugars)
    Taraxacoside (a growth hormone sugar)
    Lactupircin (an analgesic sedative stronger than Ibuprofen)

Carotenoids

    Lutein (a carotenoid eye protectant, especially of the macula)
    Violaxanthin (an eye protectant, especially of the macula, derived from zeaxanthin)

Coumarins

    Esculin (vasoprotective)
    Scopoletin (anticoagulant)

Flavonoids

    Apigenin-7-glucoside (antimutagenic, anti-cancer, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory)
    Luteolin-7-glucoside (a.k.a. cynaroside, strongly anti-cancer)
    Isorhamnetin 3-glucoside (anti-oxidant, anti-cataract)
    Luteolin-7-diglucoside (antioxidant, a free radical scavenger, anti-inflammatory, strongly anti-cancer)
    Quercetin-7-glucoside (antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative and anticarcinogenic)
    Quercetin (anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, phyto-estrogen, anti-cancer, enzyme regulator)
    Luteolin (antioxidant, a free radical scavenger, anti-inflammatory, strongly anti-cancer)
    Rutin (antiallergic, anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, and anticarcinogenic)
    Chrysoeriol (vaso-relaxant and anti-hypertensive)

Phenolic acids

    Caffeic acid (anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal, anti-oxidant)
    Chlorogenic acid (anti-hypertensive, anti-inflammatory)
    Chicoric acid (stimulates immunity, protects collagen)
    ρ-hydroxyphenylacetic acids (anti-oxidants)

Polysaccharides

    Glucans mannans (intra-cranial pressure reduction, lowers ocular pressure, diuretic, increases transplant success rate, antiinflammatory, immunostimulatory, antioxidant, anticoagulant, antiviral, antiproliferative, antiapoptosis and antitumor properties)
    inulin (inhibits growth or activities of certain pathogenic bacteria

Cyanogenic glycosides

    Prunasin (byproduct amygdalin is anti-neoplastic)

Sesquiterpene lactones (of the germacranolide type)

    11β, 13-dihydrolactucin (analgesic, sedative, antimalarial)
    Ixerin D (prevents/reduces stone formation, indigestion, pneumonia, hepatitis, and tumors)
    Ainslioside taraxinic acid (anti-leukemia)
    β-glucopyranosyl (a sugar capable of interacting with RNA)
    Taraxinic acid (anti-leukemia)
    Glucosyl ester (energy production and storage)
    11-dihydrotaraxinic acid and 13-dihydrotaraxinic acid (antivirals)
    l'-glucoside a.k.a. betulinic acid, betulin (antiprotozoal, antimicrobial, antiinflammatory, chemopreventive, antiretroviral, antimalarial and anti-tumor - especially head, neck and melanomas.)
    Lactucopicrin (sedative and analgesic)
    Lactucin (sedative and analgesic)
    Cichorin (stimulates the immune system and protects collagen)

Eudesmanolides

    Tetrahydroridentin-B
    Taraxacolide-O-β-glucopyranoside
    Prunasin (anti-tumor)
    Dihydroconiferin
    Syringin (antidiabetic)
    Dihydrosyringin
    Taraxasterol
    ψ-taraxasterol
    Homo-taraxasterol
    Stigmatsterol (an anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer steroid  and hormone precursor)

Triterpenes

    Cycloartenol
    α-amyrin
    β-amyrin ((a gastroprotective, antipruritic, analgesic and hepatoprotective triterpene)
    Arnidiol
    Faradiol
    Lupeol (antiprotozoal, antimicrobial, antiinflammatory, chemopreventive, antiretroviral, antimalarial and anti-tumor - especially head, neck and melanomas.)
    Taraxol
    Taraxaserol and
    3β-hydroxylup-18-ene-21-one

Sterols

    Taraxasterol
    ψ-taraxasterol
    Homo-taraxasterol
    β-sitosterol (a steroid that may reduce benign prostatic hyperplasia and blood cholesterol levels)
    Stigmatsterol (an anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer steroid  and hormone precursor)
    Campesterol (anti-inflammatory)

Other

    Lettucenin A
    Taraxalisin, a serine proteinase
    Amino acids
    Choline (a B-vitamin)
    Mucilage
    Pectin

https://www.ekowarehouse.com/jianmar-llc-1/organic-dandelion-root-1

https://www.sigmaaldrich.com/catalog/product/sial/09236?lang=en&region=US

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beta-Sitosterol

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stigmasterol

http://healthy-food-house.com/similar-opium-best-natural-painkiller-grows-backyard/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zeaxanthin

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutein

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aesculin

https://www.cogentoa.com/article/10.1080/23312009.2016.1212452

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/44690843_Isorhamnetin-3-glucos

https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/luteolin

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercetin

https://www.sigmaaldrich.com/catalog/product/sial/16654?lang=en&region=US

https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/rutin#section=ATC-Code

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caffeic_acid

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chlorogenic_acid

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cichoric_acid

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glucan

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mannitol

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inulin

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunasin

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lactucin

https://bmccomplementalternmed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12906-015-0700-x

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betulinic_acid

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lupeol

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lactucopicrin

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cichoric_acid

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syringin

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campesterol

Long-term storage potential:

Quote

With extracts, there is nothing to go rancid or oxidize, so the shelf life could be unlimited as long as storage conditions are cool and dry.

Dandy Blend has been on the market for over 25 years (2017). We have saved samples of the earliest packages, and periodically test them. They are still the same as they were–a loose, brown powder with no color or consistency change–and taste the same as they did when new..

If, however, Dandy Blend is exposed to humidity or other moisture, it will harden to the consistency of a brick. It is still usable if you break off a piece and boil it for a while in water, but the flavor is not as good.

https://dandyblend.com/faqs/


« Last Edit: May 05, 2019, 06:58:25 PM by R.R. Book »

Yowbarb

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #242 on: July 17, 2019, 05:45:17 PM »
I remember an era when I used to drink only dandelion root coffee or something with dandelion root and/or chicory etc.  Those beverages definitely had a strengthening effect on me.

https://practicalselfreliance.com/dandelion-coffee/

https://www.eater.com/drinks/2015/6/30/8871449/demystifying-dandelion-coffee-the-hippest-new-health-drink

Yowbarb

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #243 on: July 17, 2019, 10:23:22 PM »
R.R. great post. I agree, dandelions, seeds, tea, coffee all good additions to the survival cabinet... We should all allow at least a small corner of the property to have dandelions growing. :)
...
Let dandelions grow. Bees, beetles and birds need them

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/gardening-blog/2015/may/12/dandelions-pollinators-wildlife-garden

Dandelions are demonised as one of the most pernicious weeds, but hold back on the mowing and you’ll find a whole range of garden wildlife depends on them for food, writes Kate Bradbury

 @Kate_Bradbury
Tue 12 May 2015 06.35 EDT Last modified on Wed 14 Feb 2018 12.53 EST

Image:  Two Bees and dandelion flower.
Photograph: Alamy

A few weeks ago I walked past a lawn which hadn’t yet had its first spring cut. It was awash with bright yellow dandelions, and each one was peppered with several pollen beetles, perhaps enjoying their first meal of the year. A week later the dandelions were buzzing with bees, but a few days after that, this little patch of wildflowers had been razed – what happened to the pollen beetles and the bees?

As I write, thousands of hectares of such wildflower habitat are being destroyed under the blades of our lawn mowers, and the bees, pollen beetles, butterflies and moths are going hungry. As a weed, it’s one of the most unpopular of the bunch: dandelion tap roots are notoriously hard to dig out, the plants have an almost unrivalled knack of propagating themselves, including in walls and cracks in paving where nothing else would live, and – to add insult to injury – they are often the first flower we see in spring and the last in autumn. The dandelion is bold and brash and unrelenting. But that is why it is brilliant. It’s virtually everywhere and nearly always in flower; it’s the pollinator’s best friend.

Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale), was named after the French dent de lion, meaning lion’s tooth, which refers to its toothed leaves. Other names for dandelion include wet-the-bed and pissy-beds, which refer to its effectiveness as a diuretic

Yowbarb

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #244 on: July 17, 2019, 10:24:35 PM »
It Could Promote Liver Health
Dandelion root has long been held as a “liver tonic” in folk medicine. ... Naturopaths believe it means that dandelion root tea could help detoxify the liver, help with skin and eye problems, and relieve symptoms of liver disease.
7 Ways Dandelion Tea Could Be Good for You - Healthline
https://www.healthline.com/health/ways-dandelion-tea-could-be-good-for-your

ilinda

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #245 on: July 18, 2019, 07:58:51 PM »
I remember an era when I used to drink only dandelion root coffee or something with dandelion root and/or chicory etc.  Those beverages definitely had a strengthening effect on me.
Do you think you'll return to the healthful practice?

Yowbarb

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #246 on: July 22, 2019, 12:27:36 AM »
I remember an era when I used to drink only dandelion root coffee or something with dandelion root and/or chicory etc.  Those beverages definitely had a strengthening effect on me.
Do you think you'll return to the healthful practice?

At this point, not thinkin' I will give up regular coffee but I will supplement the coffee with the dandelion root and other beverages I used to drink. Especially when the weather is cold or I am feeling under the weather, hot beverages are better.
A lot of the coffee substitutes are made of ingredients which act as a nerve tonic, instead of a stimulant, which is good.

Yowbarb

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #247 on: July 22, 2019, 12:33:32 AM »
https://elanaspantry.com/dandelion-root-coffee/

According to The Way of Herbs , “Roasted dandelion root makes a pleasant beverage that can be consumed daily. It combines well with kukicha tea or chicory root.” I pair dandelion root with chicory which gives this Dandelion Root Coffee a deliciously bitter, coffee-like flavor.Feb 22, 2011
Dandelion Root Coffee Recipe | Elana's Pantry
...
https://coffee-brewing-methods.com/coffee/6-healthy-alternatives-to-coffee-cafix-vs-pero-vs-teeccino/     
Cafix is made from chicory, barley, malted barley, figs, and red beet extract. Cafix pride with clean ingredients, non-GMO, if this is a concern for you.



ilinda

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #248 on: September 17, 2019, 10:31:50 AM »
Most wild foods have a rather short season, and the pawpaw is no exception.  Around here in Missouri's Ozarks, they ripen in September and are ripening on the tree through most of the month, and some can still be found in October, so the pawpaw season could be approximated at one month.  But during that month, there's a whole lot of wonderful taste-bud sensations.

The pawpaws in the pic were harvested from trees hanging over the dirt road here in Reynolds County, and when they are truly ripe, they resemble (to me) a cross between ripe banana and ripe papaya.  Very sweet but with a short shelf life.  I know of no way to store them, aside from letting them sit on your table or counter while they finish ripening.  They are like tomates which will continue to ripen after picking, as hard, green papaws will continue to become more yellowish, with blackish spots forming, all the while becoming soft to the touch.  And they're FREE and totally organic.

Pawpaws are often thought of as a more southern tree, but they grow even farther north than Missouri.  So look around, folks.


R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #249 on: September 17, 2019, 04:16:11 PM »
Thank you for bringing them up Ilinda! I'm hoping to plant a pair first thing next spring, if the squirrels around here will only leave them alone.

But maybe you've provided the solution: bringing them indoors to finish ripening before they're temptingly sweet!  :)
« Last Edit: September 24, 2019, 07:12:20 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #250 on: September 18, 2019, 10:06:31 AM »
If you need seeds, this was a banner year and I can send you some.  They are well worth planting.  They seem to be an understory tree and do well along creeks, but can grow quite well on higher ground.

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #251 on: September 20, 2019, 07:00:08 AM »
Thank you so much Ilinda!  I've been overwhelmed with trying to learn about all the different cultivars of pawpaws available from certain nurseries, and would also love any information that you might have - maybe the native species might just be the best choice? 

Also, isn't it necessary to have two different types, or just two of one kind?
« Last Edit: September 20, 2019, 04:27:00 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #252 on: September 24, 2019, 05:33:23 PM »
Thank you so much Ilinda!  I've been overwhelmed with trying to learn about all the different cultivars of pawpaws available from certain nurseries, and would also love any information that you might have - maybe the native species might just be the best choice? 

Also, isn't it necessary to have two different types, or just two of one kind?
I'm not educated on the different types of pawpaws, probably because they grow so well around here, mostly wild.  In eating them from various locations, I can say they appear to be the same.  Leaves and growth habit of trees are the same, and fruit likewise.  I think the natives are always the best choice as they can be started from seed.  Some nurseries sell grafted trees, like the 25 pecan trees I bought, all of which died, and then I received two pecan seedlings as a gift,  planted them, and now they are about 8' tall and look quite healthy.

In fact, years ago before I learned how prevalent pawpaws were around here, I dug a few from a friend's  property--he lives on a river, amd his property has many pawpaw trees.  I carefully transplanted and tended the trees and then discovered they are virtually along every river and creek, scattered here and there. 

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #253 on: September 25, 2019, 05:50:21 AM »
It's very instructive to  me Ilinda that the 25 grafts failed, while the native ones thrived. 

ilinda

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #254 on: September 26, 2019, 06:41:47 PM »
Thank you so much Ilinda!  I've been overwhelmed with trying to learn about all the different cultivars of pawpaws available from certain nurseries, and would also love any information that you might have - maybe the native species might just be the best choice? 

Also, isn't it necessary to have two different types, or just two of one kind?
Someone told me one time that often nurseries will give different names to trees of the same species, based on where they were growing when discovered.  I don't know if it's true, but I do wonder where they get all these "varieties" of almonds, pecans, chestnuts, etc.  Years ago before I got into American Chestnuts, I planted about 8-10 hybrid chestnut trees and many survive.  The nursery had many varieties, and I picked "Eaton River" and "Qing". 

Am guessing that Qing is a Chinese chestnut variety, and that Eaton River was probably found along the Eaton River somewhere on the planet, thus the name(s).   Who knows if the pawpaws are similar and named for wherever they're discovered growing?    If you need pawpaw seeds, just yell.  We can call them Little Brushy Creek pawpaws, as they grow along a creek by that name on our road.

 

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