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Author Topic: COPD - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  (Read 13566 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: COPD - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
« Reply #15 on: June 18, 2019, 12:08:11 AM »
There are various articles on asthma. I wanted to narrow it down to America, and more recent studies...
This particular study compares the rate of asthma in African American children and white American children.  Latest data used is from 2019.

ilinda, it looks like this study supports the idea of more asthma among African american kids.  About 13.4 percent of African-American children have asthma, compared to about 7.4 percent of white children with asthma.

One thing we probably could not know from the study is, about the genetic differences. One difference in the prevalence of asthma in African American kids is the situation (which may be improving, not sure) of health care, better education on asthma, while indoor air pollution and environmental pollution have surely not got better for a lot of people. Bye the way, side note Unfortunately now, Latino central valley farm workers getting really sick from the drought conditions and soil diseases. People of all ages, hitting the men first...Something to bear in mind in possible cataclysmic conditions to have proper covering for the mouth in the wind and dirt... We need to somehow keep the little ones out of the blowing wind and dust and dirt and smoke...

Below, I have put some excerpts, some paragraphs, some sentences:
...

https://www.aafa.org/asthma-facts/

Asthma Facts and Figures

How Many People Die from Asthma?
Each day, ten Americans die from asthma, and in 2017, 3,564 people died from asthma. Many of these deaths are avoidable with proper treatment and care.
Adults are four times more likely to die from asthma than children.
Women are more likely to die from asthma than men and boys are more likely than girls.
African-Americans are three times more likely to die from asthma.

What Ethnic Groups Have Higher Asthma Rates?
See AAFA’s groundbreaking research report on Disparities in Asthma Care. It was published with the National Pharmaceutical Council.
Racial/ethnic differences in asthma frequency, illness and death are highly connected with poverty, city air quality, indoor allergens, not enough patient education and poor health care.
The rate of asthma and the prevalence of asthma episodes is highest among Puerto Ricans compared to all ethnic groups.
African-American children have the highest prevalence of asthma.
African-Americans in the U.S. die from asthma at a higher rate than people of other races or ethnicities.4
African-Americans are three times more likely to die from asthma, especially African-American women, than any other group.
African-Americans are three times more likely to stay in the hospital from asthma.
About 13.4 percent of African-American children have asthma, compared to about 7.4 percent of white children with asthma.

Do Men or Women Have Higher Rates of Asthma?​
9.8 percent of women aged 18 years or older have asthma, compared to 5.4 percent of men.4
Women are more likely to die from asthma than men.
19 million adults 18 years and older currently have asthma.
An average of 1 out of every 12 school-aged children has asthma.
3.4 percent of children with asthma are more likely to use a hospital emergency room.
Boys are more likely to have asthma than girls. But women are more likely to have asthma than men.
Adults are nearly four times more likely than children to die from asthma.

Yowbarb

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Re: COPD - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
« Reply #16 on: June 18, 2019, 12:16:41 AM »
Posting here about asthma partly because it is a known fact now that children who get multiple respiratory infections as a child are more likely to develop adult-onset asthma. I did have lots of respiratory infections, almost perishing from pneumonia and wrong drug, sulfa before I was one year old. I do have that, adult-onset asthma. I did not have childhood asthma. In some unfortunate people the asthma progresses on to COPD. This may be partly chronic bronchitis or it may be partly emphysema. Another factor is maternal smoking, another one is childhood exposure to cigarette smoking. My parents smoked in the house until I was eight years old. The cigarettes were probably not as bad in those distant days.

« Last Edit: June 18, 2019, 12:30:15 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: COPD - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
« Reply #17 on: June 18, 2019, 12:27:13 AM »
This article discusses  childhood factors such as pneumonia, leading to lessened lung function as an adult, asthma, and COPD. It also touches on ethnicity. I will put the ethnicity part in the next post. Excerpts below on Childhood Disadvantage factors:

https://journal.copdfoundation.org/jcopdf/id/1117/Evaluation-of-Individuals-at-Risk-for-COPD-Beyond-the-Scope-of-the-Global-Initiative-for-Chronic-Obstructive-Lung-Disease

Childhood Disadvantage Factors
"Normal lung growth is closely related to processes occurring during gestation, childhood and adolescence.53-55 Barker et al showed that deaths from COPD in adulthood are associated with low weight at birth and at the first year because of alterations of lung development. Infections such as bronchitis, pneumonia and whooping cough in childhood further reduce lung function in adulthood.

One of the most important studies in this regard is from Svanes et al which coined the term childhood disadvantage factors (CDF) and include parental asthma, maternal asthma, childhood asthma, severe respiratory infections before the age of 5 and maternal smoking. Comparing the FEV1 attained in adulthood of individuals who showed no CDF against those who had one or more CDFs, it was noted that the latter reached an average FEV1 -95 ml (men) and -60 ml (women). When comparing those who had 3 CDFs, attained FEV1 was -274 ml (men) and -208 ml (women). Furthermore, it was observed that the presence of CDF correlated with greater decline in FEV1 and higher incidence of COPD."



Yowbarb

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Re: COPD - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
« Reply #18 on: June 18, 2019, 12:27:36 AM »
https://journal.copdfoundation.org/jcopdf/id/1117/Evaluation-of-Individuals-at-Risk-for-COPD-Beyond-the-Scope-of-the-Global-Initiative-for-Chronic-Obstructive-Lung-Disease

"...it is not surprising that race and ethnicity play an equally important role. This was demonstrated by the COPD Genetic Epidemiology (COPDGene) study where 42% of African-Americans developed early (<55 years) and severe COPD (FEV1 <50% predictive) compared with 14% of non-Hispanic whites. In a cohort of smokers and former smokers of New Mexico it was found that Hispanic ethnicity and those with Native American ancestors had a lower risk of developing COPD.

Yowbarb

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Re: COPD - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
« Reply #19 on: June 18, 2019, 12:36:26 AM »
I liberally consumed coconut cream today, shared with me by my daughter.
I put in my coffee.
Mixed it with my nonfat yogurt. 
Had a sweet tooth late, so I mixed the coconut cream with some chocolate syrup.
I am breathing better and I am thinking this is part of the reason why.
Also on some really powerful steroid for a few days more, since my COPD has not really been well under control for months now.
I know that is partly why too. The steroid. But I do sense the benefits from the coconut cream. It has guar gum in it but doesn't seem to harm me. Guar is from a bean. It is used as a medicine sometimes to help lower the blood pressure. Coconut Cream. I imagine there are several brands of it. Screen shot here of the brand my daughter gave me, Native Forest, Organic.  I had posted some things about coconut helping COPD etc. in some other Topic...  I am just guessing that there is some fat and nutrient I have been totally missing, which I need which is in the coconut cream.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2019, 12:54:48 AM by Yowbarb »

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Re: COPD - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
« Reply #20 on: June 18, 2019, 09:04:37 AM »
Barb, I hope your breathing eases soon. 

Have you thought about a change in environment, or maybe a move would seem impossible right now?

Yowbarb

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Re: COPD - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
« Reply #21 on: June 18, 2019, 11:00:39 AM »
Barb, I hope your breathing eases soon. 

Have you thought about a change in environment, or maybe a move would seem impossible right now?

It is better today... it is not like crisis mode but it is not well under control, normally I am not uncomfortable but get the spasmodic coughing and taking lots of meds. today getting better...
Not possible to move.. yet

ilinda

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Re: COPD - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
« Reply #22 on: June 18, 2019, 01:21:58 PM »
Barb, I hope your breathing eases soon. 

Have you thought about a change in environment, or maybe a move would seem impossible right now?

It is better today... it is not like crisis mode but it is not well under control, normally I am not uncomfortable but get the spasmodic coughing and taking lots of meds. today getting better...
Not possible to move.. yet
Your many posts are well received here and hopefully I can reread them several times.  We do have a lot in common when it comes to pumonary issues.

A few questions:
1) how well hydrated are you on a given day?  Do you drink one large glass of water upon arising every morning, just to start the day?
2) have you ever had an ultrasound of your heart to determine if you have a defective aortic valve?  (Because the aortic valve is the last stop the dirty, CO2-filled blood makes before it hits the lungs, a defective aortic valve might mean less effective "CO2 scrubbing", and poorly oxygenated blood can lead to coughing, and possibly eventually COPD;
3)  In a job interview one time, the doctor was researching COPD, partial pressures of O2:CO2, etc., and he told me that COPD patients don't have trouble getting oxygen in, but they do have trouble getting CO2 out.  Maybe this is why the intense coughing sometimes--trying very hard to expel the excess CO2;
4)  when you are having an asthma attack (I too have had many), did you learn how to hum (which seems to help defer the cough reflex)?  (For some reason during one serious asthma attack, I began humming nursery rhymes/tunes such as "Here Comes Peter Cottontail..." and it really calmed down my bronchioles.  Years later, I read in some esoteric article about how it has been discovered that humming can be helpful in preventing or stopping asthma.  I've learned since then that frequency is important, so maybe more research is needed to learn best humming frequencies;
5) one doctor told me once that just the mere act of coughing sets up inflammation, so if there's no tickle it's not productive, suppressing some of the coughing might also be helpful.
5)  Cordyceps is one mushroom that helps oxygenate the blood because it seems to stimulate red blood cell production.
6)  diagnosing COPD should not be done during a respiratory infection, as the diagnosis may not be sound;
7) breating mint helps open the airways, so if you have any peppermint or spearmint growing in the yard, eat a leaf or two whenever you feel like it.
As a side note, my dad coughed, it seems, his entire life, as I don't remember his not coughing.  As he grew older, the coughing grew worse, and he developed COPD.  All these years I assumed it was his lungs t hat were defective, but in later years realized it may very well have been that he had a defective aortic valve, and thus never had well-oxygenated blood. (He did smoke for a while, and did sometimes work in dirty factories.)

Hope I didn't come off sounding preachy, but just trying to share a few of the tidbits I've learned over the years.  Here's sending you some high-energy oxygen to displace any CO2 not needed, and wishing you a wonderful time reading and learning and sharing.

ilinda

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Re: COPD - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
« Reply #23 on: June 20, 2019, 02:15:57 PM »
One more thing that is important in breathing anomalies, and that is talking.  Yes, talking.  It is amazing how quickly just saying a few words can cause a rapid drop in blood oxygen level!  I saw it with my own eyes.

In 2014 hubby took me to an ER for respiratory illness that seemed never to end and which turned out to be pneumonia.  While in the ER, one of the things they tested was blood oxygen level, with the use of a small device that is clamped onto one finger, which within seconds registers your blood oxygen level.  While the device was there, and results were displayed, I said a few words and was shocked to see how quickly my oxygen level dropped.  It was dramatic and fast!  Still in shock.

So since that  time if I even think I have the beginning of a respiratory infection, no matter how mild, I never talk on the phone and remind hubby I'm not going to talk much till feeling better.  After thinking about the connection, I recalled several incidents in the past where I had a respiratory infection and either gave a talk somewhere, or talked on the phone, and in each instance, an asthma attack followed.  No talking is a good rule when in respiratory distress.

Yowbarb

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Re: COPD - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
« Reply #24 on: June 20, 2019, 11:01:06 PM »
One more thing that is important in breathing anomalies, and that is talking.  Yes, talking.  It is amazing how quickly just saying a few words can cause a rapid drop in blood oxygen level!  I saw it with my own eyes.

In 2014 hubby took me to an ER for respiratory illness that seemed never to end and which turned out to be pneumonia.  While in the ER, one of the things they tested was blood oxygen level, with the use of a small device that is clamped onto one finger, which within seconds registers your blood oxygen level.  While the device was there, and results were displayed, I said a few words and was shocked to see how quickly my oxygen level dropped.  It was dramatic and fast!  Still in shock.

So since that  time if I even think I have the beginning of a respiratory infection, no matter how mild, I never talk on the phone and remind hubby I'm not going to talk much till feeling better.  After thinking about the connection, I recalled several incidents in the past where I had a respiratory infection and either gave a talk somewhere, or talked on the phone, and in each instance, an asthma attack followed.  No talking is a good rule when in respiratory distress.

ilinda that is a good rule to know and follow...

Yowbarb

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Re: COPD - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
« Reply #25 on: June 20, 2019, 11:02:10 PM »
Barb, I hope your breathing eases soon. 

Have you thought about a change in environment, or maybe a move would seem impossible right now?

It is better today... it is not like crisis mode but it is not well under control, normally I am not uncomfortable but get the spasmodic coughing and taking lots of meds. today getting better...
Not possible to move.. yet
Your many posts are well received here and hopefully I can reread them several times.  We do have a lot in common when it comes to pumonary issues.

A few questions:
1) how well hydrated are you on a given day?  Do you drink one large glass of water upon arising every morning, just to start the day?
2) have you ever had an ultrasound of your heart to determine if you have a defective aortic valve?  (Because the aortic valve is the last stop the dirty, CO2-filled blood makes before it hits the lungs, a defective aortic valve might mean less effective "CO2 scrubbing", and poorly oxygenated blood can lead to coughing, and possibly eventually COPD;
3)  In a job interview one time, the doctor was researching COPD, partial pressures of O2:CO2, etc., and he told me that COPD patients don't have trouble getting oxygen in, but they do have trouble getting CO2 out.  Maybe this is why the intense coughing sometimes--trying very hard to expel the excess CO2;
4)  when you are having an asthma attack (I too have had many), did you learn how to hum (which seems to help defer the cough reflex)?  (For some reason during one serious asthma attack, I began humming nursery rhymes/tunes such as "Here Comes Peter Cottontail..." and it really calmed down my bronchioles.  Years later, I read in some esoteric article about how it has been discovered that humming can be helpful in preventing or stopping asthma.  I've learned since then that frequency is important, so maybe more research is needed to learn best humming frequencies;
5) one doctor told me once that just the mere act of coughing sets up inflammation, so if there's no tickle it's not productive, suppressing some of the coughing might also be helpful.
5)  Cordyceps is one mushroom that helps oxygenate the blood because it seems to stimulate red blood cell production.
6)  diagnosing COPD should not be done during a respiratory infection, as the diagnosis may not be sound;
7) breating mint helps open the airways, so if you have any peppermint or spearmint growing in the yard, eat a leaf or two whenever you feel like it.
As a side note, my dad coughed, it seems, his entire life, as I don't remember his not coughing.  As he grew older, the coughing grew worse, and he developed COPD.  All these years I assumed it was his lungs t hat were defective, but in later years realized it may very well have been that he had a defective aortic valve, and thus never had well-oxygenated blood. (He did smoke for a while, and did sometimes work in dirty factories.)

Hope I didn't come off sounding preachy, but just trying to share a few of the tidbits I've learned over the years.  Here's sending you some high-energy oxygen to displace any CO2 not needed, and wishing you a wonderful time reading and learning and sharing.

ilinda, great Reply! I will answer these one by one...

Yowbarb

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Re: COPD - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
« Reply #26 on: June 21, 2019, 12:14:33 AM »
Barb, I hope your breathing eases soon. 

Have you thought about a change in environment, or maybe a move would seem impossible right now?

It is better today... it is not like crisis mode but it is not well under control, normally I am not uncomfortable but get the spasmodic coughing and taking lots of meds. today getting better...
Not possible to move.. yet
Your many posts are well received here and hopefully I can reread them several times.  We do have a lot in common when it comes to pulmonary issues.

A few questions:
Quote
1 how well hydrated are you on a given day?  Do you drink one large glass of water upon arising every morning, just to start the day?
ANSWER: I consider myself well- hydrated, most of the time. I do start the day with a lot of water and have for years. I sleep with water by my bed. If I have been sick. I need to be able to grab the water if my throat sticks together or I am wheezing. It doesn't happen all the time but the water helps me wash it out, had some episodes of my throat sticking together; immediate water and coughing out followed by the spray is needed when this happens.

Quote
2 have you ever had an ultrasound of your heart to determine if you have a defective aortic valve?  (Because the aortic valve is the last stop the dirty, CO2-filled blood makes before it hits the lungs, a defective aortic valve might mean less effective "CO2 scrubbing", and poorly oxygenated blood can lead to coughing, and possibly eventually COPD;


ANSWER:
I have had extensive heart screening a couple of times, pre surgery screening was one reason for that. All they found was a benign heart murmur. Even though I had heart palpitations at times. The last screening was a few years ago though. One doc told me verbally I have PAT regardless of what any test might say etc. She didn't do the halter monitor she just knew. I learned how to do a manipulation from an old ER technician, aged 80 who was a former doctor, will post it sometime. It is like an isometric exercise where you constrict the chest forward. It slows the heart if the rhythm seems to go off. Also on the rare occasion it happens, I stroke the carotid artery on the neck, applying gentle pressure. So I have never passed out from it. When I sometimes had to take long trips by myself I would be sure to bring orange juice, water and Coenzyme Q10 capsules. If I felt weird in anyway and got that certain feeling of doom, I put the Coenzyme Q10 under my tongue and had a few ounces of orange juice, water. Note: Tests have shown that when a person is having an asthma attack their blood is low in both salt and sugar. This may not be the same for everyone. Keeping OJ with me when out and about seems a good idea. A couple times, I remembered that, so I have taken warm purified water and putting some sea salt and sugar or honey in it and stirring. I did experience relief. Then I found having Gatorade around helps too, I had forgot about that, though.
 
Heart: I will look more into the possiblity of a valve problem.
Regardless of them not finding PAT on my halter monitor test I know my heart speeds up too much at times and is irregular. Normally it is not a situation, I am not afraid of it. Note since figuring out I have FMF and starting on the Colchicine I have less weird episodes, that is inflammation and kidneys or liver not working up to normal... that is complicated... I did post about it elsewhere. At any rate it keeps a lot of bad symptoms away...but this past year the COPD got worse. COPD can happen as a result of the FMF.


Quote
3)  In a job interview one time, the doctor was researching COPD, partial pressures of O2:CO2, etc., and he told me that COPD patients don't have trouble getting oxygen in, but they do have trouble getting CO2 out.  Maybe this is why the intense coughing sometimes--trying very hard to expel the excess CO2;
[/size]

ANSWER:
I was diagnosed with COPD around 1998, but it wasn't until the middle of the night in 2005 that the ER doc told me I do have emphysema with that. In emphysema, yes the lungs have a hard time pushing the air out. Usually I can describe this as under well control with medicines. My O2 levels are often pretty good even if I have been in distress, but at times I feel they may have gone dangerously low.
ilinda I think I should get a O2 gadget. It is possible that at times my C02 goes too high and I would like to know that. Thanks for the idea.
[/size]

Quote
4)  when you are having an asthma attack (I too have had many), did you learn how to hum (which seems to help defer the cough reflex)?  (For some reason during one serious asthma attack, I began humming nursery rhymes/tunes such as "Here Comes Peter Cottontail..." and it really calmed down my bronchioles.  Years later, I read in some esoteric article about how it has been discovered that humming can be helpful in preventing or stopping asthma.  I've learned since then that frequency is important, so maybe more research is needed to learn best humming frequencies;

ANSWER:
No I never thought about humming. That is miraculous that you sort of instinctively began humming.


Quote
5) one doctor told me once that just the mere act of coughing sets up inflammation, so if there's no tickle it's not productive, suppressing some of the coughing might also be helpful.
/

ANSWER: Although I do take a mucus reliever to bring up mucus I also have a mild cough suppressant which I take. On the occasions where I cough badly, I cannot help that, it is because I have to clear my airways, something needs to come up so there is room to breath. This is why I ended up on the Prednisone, it is to ease the inflammation, big improvement after one week but still the spasmodic coughing a few times per day.
 

5)  Cordyceps is one mushroom that helps oxygenate the blood because it seems to stimulate red blood cell production.

ANSWER: I have not tried this, sounds good. Most of the time my hemoglobin is very good, but I have had anemia a few times in my life. I just dose myself up with Blackstrap but I think the mushroom is a good idea.

6)  diagnosing COPD should not be done during a respiratory infection, as the diagnosis may not be sound;
ANSWER:
When I got diagnosed the intern did a very careful test measuring my breath, pulse. He did the diagnosis. Cannot remember the name of the test.


7) breathing mint helps open the airways, so if you have any peppermint or spearmint growing in the yard, eat a leaf or two whenever you feel like it.
As a side note, my dad coughed, it seems, his entire life, as I don't remember his not coughing.  As he grew older, the coughing grew worse, and he developed COPD.  All these years I assumed it was his lungs that were defective, but in later years realized it may very well have been that he had a defective aortic valve, and thus never had well-oxygenated blood. (He did smoke for a while, and did sometimes work in dirty factories.)


ilinda, thanks for sharing that about your dear Father. You do know for sure the connection between his chronic coughing and the aortic valve problem. Sad, yet it gives insight ... What you posted will surely help someone. I had not been aware of that.

I will try to eat the mint more. As a child I used to go outside and find it growing wild near the leaking hose connection and eat it. That is one of those foods I used to pay more attention to. A bit of mint and parley were part of a lot of meals. mint teas was a regular for me. Natural chlorophyll liquid from the health food store, too. My old German Naturopath told me to have the parsley and mint, raw with meals and to take the liquid chlorophyll. In those days although I had some bad respiratory infections I did not get asthma only rarely was not on medications regularly. I would start to get an attack then take some Yerba Santa tea and it stopped. In those days I was not stuck on a bunch of medicines, but things can change for the worse in fifty years.

 


Quote
Hope I didn't come off sounding preachy, but just trying to share a few of the tidbits I've learned over the years.  Here's sending you some high-energy oxygen to displace any CO2 not needed, and wishing you a wonderful time reading and learning and sharing.

ANSWER: ilinda thanks! your Reply was wonderful and does give me some things to think about and add to my regime. I am sorry to hear about your trials too... I didn't know until you shared that...

Main thing I would suggest is be on the watch for molds and lots of pollutants, natural though they may be in the farm area...

Some people also get really sick from something called NTM. Non Tuberculosis Mycobacteria, found in soil and water. This is one thing I hope to get tested for in my upcoming pulmonology screenings. That is a subject for a whole other post.  NOTE: A lot of my current, worse symptoms started in the spring, when we had a stalled construction project in our back yard.
Large area of dusty dirt, right up to the back patio,. It will be gone in the next few weeks as work resumes and cement covers that area. Meanwhile, (I) am the one who frequently goes to the patio door and lets the pets in and out. Now we have a pet door but some of them need a little help and I need to make sure they get in and eat. I am also the one who sweeps up that area.  The dusty dirt gets all into the living room. The symptoms of NTM are similar to tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is also caused by a mycobacteria.

Well bottom line, city or country things like dirt, mold, contaminated water chemicals dumped into the bay, none of this helps the breathing. It sometimes cost some big bucks trying to examine the environment to find a cause of the problem too, and not always easy to go to a specialist and also get them to run the proper test. To the best of my knowledge this test is: Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs)


Differentiation between NTM infection and tuberculosis (TB) can be difficult. For more than a century, the Tuberculin skin test (TST or Mantoux) has been used for detecting latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and sometimes as an additional diagnostic tool for active TB. The TST suffers from suboptimal sensitivity and it is unreliable in distinguishing Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection from infection with NTM and previous BCG-vaccination [12].

Immunodiagnostic tests such as the Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are more specific and are based on the T-cell mediated IFN-γ release after stimulation
with specific MTB antigens.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3976367/


My Note: COPD patients who develop bronchiestasis often do develop NTM. Note there are more recent articles than this..Tuck this away for reference, too:  

https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1164/ajrccm-conference.2019.199.1_MeetingAbstracts.A1035
« Last Edit: June 21, 2019, 12:56:09 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: COPD - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
« Reply #27 on: June 21, 2019, 12:28:04 AM »
PS people who do NOT have COPD and do NOT have bronchiestasis from COPD can get and do get NTM Non tuberculosis Mycobacteria.
It is an increasingly common worldwide health problem.
Vinegar is one cheap thing and gets rid of the bacteria in spaces, clothing. some world organization of health or NIH was studying that on how to help third world people as well. It was a relief to find the vinegar really helped. Also vinegar is safe and so much less corrosive to the sick person's environment than bleach.

It is a under-diagnosed but increasingly common problem. The vinegar helps kill the Tuberculosis Mycobacteria and the Non Tuberculosis Mycobacteria. I don't have data yet on whether internal, drinking of vinegar makes a difference... Maybe ...

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140225101501.htm

Vinegar kills tuberculosis, other mycobacteria
Date:
February 25, 2014
Source:
American Society for Microbiology
Summary:
The active ingredient in vinegar, acetic acid, can effectively kill mycobacteria, even highly drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an international team of researchers reports. It is possible that acetic acid could therefore be used as an inexpensive and non-toxic disinfectant against drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) bacteria as well as other stubborn, disinfectant-resistant mycobacteria. Research continues into its potential uses, from sterilizing medical equipment to being used as a common disinfectant.
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The active ingredient in vinegar, acetic acid, can effectively kill mycobacteria, even highly drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an international team of researchers from Venezuela, France, and the US reports in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Acetic acid might be used as an inexpensive and non-toxic disinfectant against drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) bacteria as well as other stubborn, disinfectant-resistant mycobacteria.

Work with drug-resistant tuberculosis bacteria carries serious biohazard risks. Chlorine bleach is often used to disinfect TB cultures and clinical samples, but bleach is toxic and corrosive. Other effective commercial disinfectants can be too expensive for TB labs in the resource-poor countries where the majority of TB occurs.

"Mycobacteria are known to cause tuberculosis and leprosy, but non-TB mycobacteria are common in the environment, even in tap water, and are resistant to commonly used disinfectants. When they contaminate the sites of surgery or cosmetic procedures, they cause serious infections. Innately resistant to most antibiotics, they require months of therapy and can leave deforming scars." says Howard Takiff, senior author on the study and head of the Laboratory of Molecular Genetics at the Venezuelan Institute of Scientific Investigation (IVIC) in Caracas.

"Many cosmetic procedures are performed outside of hospital settings in developing countries, where effective disinfectants are not available." Takiff says, "These bacteria are emerging pathogens. How do you get rid of them?"

While investigating the ability of non-TB mycobacteria to resist disinfectants and antibiotics, Takiff's postdoctoral fellow, Claudia Cortesia stumbled upon vinegar's ability to kill mycobacteria. Testing a drug that needed to be dissolved in acetic acid, Cortesia found that the control, with acetic acid alone, killed the mycobacteria she wanted to study.

"After Claudia's initial observation, we tested for the minimal concentrations and exposure times that would kill different mycobacteria," says Takiff. Since the Venezuelan lab does not work with clinical TB, collaborators Catherine Vilchèze and William Jacobs, Jr. at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York tested TB strains and found that exposure to a 6% solution of acetic acid for 30 minutes effectively kills tuberculosis, even strains resistant to almost all antibiotics.

Said another way, exposure to 6% acetic acid, just slightly more concentrated than supermarket vinegar, for 30 minutes, reduced the numbers of TB mycobacteria from around 100 million to undetectable levels.

During a sabbatical in Laurent Kremer's laboratory at the University of Montpellier 2 in France, Takiff tested how effective acetic acid was against M. abscessus, one of the most resistant and pathogenic of the non-TB mycobacteria.

M. abscessus required exposure to a stronger 10% acetic acid solution for 30 minutes to be effectively eliminated. The team also tested the activity under biologically 'dirty' conditions similar to those encountered in clinical situations, by adding albumin protein and red blood cells to the acetic acid and found it was still effective.

"There is a real need for less toxic and less expensive disinfectants that can eliminate TB and non-TB mycobacteria, especially in resource-poor countries," says Takiff. He notes that even a 25% solution of acetic acid is only a minor irritant and around US$100 can buy enough acetic acid to disinfect up to 20 liters of TB cultures or clinical samples.

"For now this is simply an interesting observation. Vinegar has been used for thousands of years as a common disinfectant and we merely extended studies from the early 20th century on acetic acid," concludes Takiff. "Whether it could be useful in the clinic or mycobacteriology labs for sterilizing medical equipment or disinfecting cultures or clinical specimens remains to be determined."

Story Source:

Materials provided by American Society for Microbiology. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference:

C. Cortesia, C. Vilcheze, A. Bernut, W. Contreras, K. Gomez, J. de Waard, W. R. Jacobs, L. Kremer, H. Takiff. Acetic Acid, the Active Component of Vinegar, Is an Effective Tuberculocidal Disinfectant. mBio, 2014; 5 (2): e00013-14 DOI: 10.1128/mBio.00013-14
     
« Last Edit: June 21, 2019, 01:00:35 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: COPD - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
« Reply #28 on: June 21, 2019, 12:35:33 AM »
ilinda I hope you did not mind the humongous font,  Haha,  ;D
Seemed to help me keep track of the questions and answers better. I hope it helps someone.
Thanks so much for all the ideas.
I edited and re edited and kept adding, it is a long post.

There are foods which I used to consume frequently such as the mint, parsley, mint teas, etc. which you mentioned, which I rarely have any more. I need to do a few simple things to help myself more...
« Last Edit: June 21, 2019, 12:54:25 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: COPD - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
« Reply #29 on: June 21, 2019, 01:06:06 AM »
Last note for now, on the NTM: Non tuberculosis Mycobacteria.

NTM is not contagious but it is infectious and the person gets sick from soil or water or both.
The water can be hot tubs, swimming pools, gyms shower areas.
I even read that mycobacteria can breed in water filters. I have to look into that, we have one.
 

 

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