Win-Win Survival Communities The Kolbrin Bible Complete Danjeon Breathing System Radio Free Earth

Author Topic: Northern Permaculture  (Read 37637 times)

ilinda

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4405
  • Karma: +33/-0
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #270 on: November 30, 2019, 01:27:02 PM »
That was a real shocker to see the temperature differences shown in the video!

R.R. Book

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8859
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #271 on: January 24, 2020, 05:38:41 AM »
We've discussed on the "Eating with the Seasons" thread about how healthy artichokes are as a food choice, and how to prepare them.  While they're not often considered a Northern permaculture crop, they can indeed be treated as non-annuals, with a little care:

1. Site the patch in a part of the garden which will permit the plants to be a few feet apart, as they have a wide leaf-spread.  PFAF says soil pH doesn't matter to this species, but they need sunlight.


2. Choose the "Imperial Star" variety, which bears chokes in the first season.  Or opt for sweet anthocyanin-rich Violetta, but expect it to die back several times a year after each fruiting, and then regrow.  Imperial Star isn't triggered to die back just because it produces chokes.  In Northern Europe, hardier choices include Scandinavian cultivars ‘Herrgård’ and ‘Serridslevgaard’

3. Expect to harvest 2 large chokes and half a dozen small ones from each plant before frost, beginning in the first year for Imperial Star, or the 2nd year for other varieties.

4. The plant should be cut back to several inches high before frost, and the roots dug up and brought indoors to the root cellar, greenhouse, etc.  and placed in soil.  The first link below suggests planting them in the ground in burlap bag root balls, like trees, and then pulling out the bags to root cellar before each winter, but natural burlap does rot in the ground.  The second link below says roots are fully winter hardy when not saturated with moisture, and can be cloched or grown in a cold frame or greenhouse without any heat in Scandinavia.  Any roots left in the ground over winter in the North here in North America may die due to winter moisture, or they might do well in situ if covered with mounded soil, leaves, etc.

5. Since artichokes have a truly perennial habit in warm climates (and when babied in the North as described), the roots will need to be divided every several years, which means you'll get free extra plants  :)



From PFAF:

Quote
The globe artichoke has become important as a medicinal herb in recent years following the discovery of cynarin. This bitter-tasting compound, which is found in the leaves, improves liver and gall bladder function, stimulates the secretion of digestive juices, especially bile, and lowers blood cholesterol levels[238, 254]. The leaves are anticholesterolemic, antirheumatic, cholagogue, digestive, diuretic, hypoglycaemic and lithontripic[7, 21, 165]. They are used internally in the treatment of chronic liver and gall bladder diseases, jaundice, hepatitis, arteriosclerosis and the early stages of late-onset diabetes[238, 254]. The leaves are best harvested just before the plant flowers, and can be used fresh or dried[238]. The German Commission E Monographs, a therapeutic guide to herbal medicine, approve Cynara scolymus (Cynara cardunculus subsp. flavescens)for liver and gallbladder complaints, loss of appetite (see [302] for critics of commission E).
« Last Edit: January 24, 2020, 06:47:52 AM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8859
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #272 on: January 31, 2020, 02:15:10 PM »
Cummins Nursery in New York is one of the foremost breeders of stone-fruit trees in the U.S.  Here's their current list of available trees for shipping, and which size rootstock they're growing on.  Their inventory is usually quickly depleted each year:


All fruit trees from this company will likely need some cold (chilling hours) during the winter months, and may not be suitable in warm zones.


ilinda

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4405
  • Karma: +33/-0
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #273 on: January 31, 2020, 06:43:46 PM »
Thanks for that link.  Am always on the lookout for new sources of fruit trees.  If you know of a source of jujube trees, or even jujube seeds, that would be cool.  I had ordered some jujube seeds a couple of years ago through a seed swap type of organization and the person offering them never sent them, nor would she ever respond to my letters or emails about where my seeds are.

Have heard it's a good one to grow.  More variety on the homestead.

R.R. Book

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8859
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #274 on: February 01, 2020, 06:29:58 AM »
That's an especially good choice since the fruit is anti-viral and can be dehydrated for long-term storage!

Here are some sources that will ship:

http://ediblelandscaping.com/products/trees/Jujubes/ in Virginia

https://www.groworganic.com/collections/jujube-trees in California

https://www.willisorchards.com/category/jujube-trees in Georgia

https://rollingrivernursery.com/products/50/fruit-trees/jujubes-ziziphus-jujuba in California

https://baylaurelnursery.com/jujubes.html in California

https://www.burntridgenursery.com/Jujube-Trees/products/21/ in Washington State

https://onegreenworld.com/product-category/fruiting-shrubs/jujube/ in Oregon

https://www.tytyga.com/Li-Jujube-p/frujuj-li.htm in Georgia (their stated zones are questionable)

https://justfruitsandexotics.com/?s=jujube in Florida

https://raintreenursery.com/fruit-trees/unusual-edibles-jujube in Washington

https://www.treesofantiquity.com/collections/jujube-trees in California

https://www.etsy.com/market/jujube_tree

http://www.nuttrees.net/jujube.html a.k.a. England's Nursery in Kentucky

https://www.burpee.com/fruit/specialty-fruits/jujube-shanxi-li-prod100086.html Headquartered in Pennsylvania

https://www.isons.com/shop/specialty-fruits/jujube/lang-jujube-tree-2/ in Georgia

https://bobwellsnursery.com/?s=jujube&post_type=product in Texas

https://www.lecooke.com/fruit-trees/jujube-trees.html in California

I've had good experiences with nearly all of those nurseries in the past.  Etsy might best be used as a seed source.

Jujube fruits resemble dates when dead ripe.  All cultivars are self-fruitful, meaning you only need one for good pollination and fruit-set, though some nurseries recommend planting two for a better crop.  In the North, they fruit best in planting zone 6 except for one that withstands zone 5, but all should do well in most Southern climates, especially arid ones.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2020, 12:58:56 PM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8859
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #275 on: February 01, 2020, 06:37:28 AM »
Comparison of Jujube cultivars.  Note that some of these have been bred in the U.S. for generations now, and are not likely recent imports from China:

https://garden.org/plants/group/jujubes/

Quote
'Li' is the one to plant if you have room for only one tree. Fruits are abundant, round, 1-1/2 to 2 inches in diameter, and sweet. It matures early, a great benefit in short-growing-season areas.

'Lang', compared with 'Li', is taller, and the fruit is a bit more elongated or pear-shaped, about 3/4 inch in diameter and 2 inches long, and has thicker skin. The fruit is a bit less sweet than that of 'Li' and best eaten dried. Branches are nearly thornless.

Other Varieties
'Sherwood' fruits are smaller than 'Li' and ripen later. They keep well in the refrigerator up to 6 weeks. Discovered in the southern Louisiana woods, the tree has an attractive, narrow, weeping shape.

'Silverhill' (also called 'Tiger Tooth') produces elongated fruits that are excellent for drying.

'So' produces high-quality, round fruit on a zigzag-shaped tree.

'Shui Men' (or 'Sui Men') is a highly regarded midseason variety. Its fruits taste good fresh or dried.

'GA 866' is noted for its remarkably high sugar content.

I believe that another name for "So" is "Contorted."

Other varieties not mentioned:

Norris , Shanxi LiBlack Sea , Chico a.k.a. GI7-62 , Winter Delight a.k.a. Mango Dong Zho , Honey Jar (zone 5?) , Sihong a.k.a Shi Hong , Massandra

Remember that larger cultivars can be trained to any height desired for smaller spaces, with regular pruning.

More disambiguation and comments about fertility:

https://growingfruit.org/t/identifying-li-shanxi-li-and-yu-jujubes/8300

https://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_h/H330/
« Last Edit: February 01, 2020, 12:53:24 PM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8859
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #276 on: February 01, 2020, 07:51:55 AM »
Note from PFAF:

Quote
Jujube is both a delicious fruit and an effective herbal remedy. It aids weight gain, improves muscular strength and increases stamina[254]. In Chinese medicine it is prescribed as a tonic to strengthen liver function[254]. Japanese research has shown that jujube increases immune-system resistance. In one clinical trial in China 12 patients with liver complaints were given jujube, peanuts and brown sugar nightly. In four weeks their liver function had improved[254]. Antidote, diuretic, emollient, expectorant[11, 61, 174, 178, 194]. The dried fruits contain saponins, triterpenoids and alkaloids[279]. They are anodyne, anticancer, pectoral, refrigerant, sedative, stomachic, styptic and tonic[4, 176, 218]. They are considered to purify the blood and aid digestion[240]. They are used internally in the treatment of a range of conditions including chronic fatigue, loss of appetite, diarrhoea, pharyngitis, bronchitis, anaemia, irritability and hysteria[176, 238, 279]. The seed contains a number of medically active compounds including saponins, triterpenes, flavonoids and alkaloids[279]. It is hypnotic, narcotic, sedative, stomachic and tonic[147, 176, 218]. It is used internally in the treatment of palpitations, insomnia, nervous exhaustion, night sweats and excessive perspiration[176, 238]. The root is used in the treatment of dyspepsia[218]. A decoction of the root has been used in the treatment of fevers[4, 240]. The root is made into a powder and applied to old wounds and ulcers[240]. The leaves are astringent and febrifuge[4, 218]. They are said to promote the growth of hair[218]. They are used to form a plaster in the treatment of strangury[240]. The plant is a folk remedy for anaemia, hypertonia, nephritis and nervous diseases[218]. The plant is widely used in China as a treatment for burns[218].

ilinda

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4405
  • Karma: +33/-0
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #277 on: February 01, 2020, 06:10:50 PM »
Wow!  Some wonderfully helpful jujube information.  Worth printing onto hard copy.

 

Home Study System

Home Study System
Save 30%

BUY NOW

The ideal win-win survival community library reference system offers a broad range of valuable survival skills and knowledge. Ideal those in preparedness, it provides in-depth knowledge about how to form communities and operate two-way communications.

For human needs, it also includes a low-impact energy self-healing art and an essential role for seniors in survival communities.

A special note for those of you living outside the United States, we optimized this system for the lowest possible Priority Mail costs.

4 Paperbacks and 6 DVDs

Win-Win Survival Communities Signed

Radio Free Earth Color (Color Editon) Signed

Complete Danjeon Breathing System w/6 DVDs

Survival Wellness Advocacy and the BIG WIN

BUY NOW