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Author Topic: Maps  (Read 2220 times)

Socrates

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Maps
« on: September 27, 2016, 09:18:38 AM »


Hey, wait a minute; see that safe spot in the south of France?
I have 2 ha of land there :D
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MadMax

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Re: Maps
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2017, 03:23:25 AM »
Now even Forbes is taking notice!!

The Shocking Doomsday Maps Of The World And The Billionaire Escape Plans

https://www.forbes.com/sites/jimdobson/2017/06/10/the-shocking-doomsday-maps-of-the-world-and-the-billionaire-escape-plans/#417352264047

When I wrote my first article on billionaire bunkers years ago, I never would have imagined how quickly our world was changing. Our lives are in a constant state of flux, the political situation aside, our earth is rapidly changing. Between the increase of bizarre weather patterns hitting the earth, and recent major volcanic activity, now more than ever our focus is on our planets future.

.Often dismissed as crazy prophets, their thoughts for a new world were quickly ignored and laughed at. Gordon-Michael Scallion was a futurist, teacher of consciousness studies and metaphysics and a spiritual visionary. In the 80's he claims to have had a spiritual awakening that helped him create very detailed maps of future world, all stemming from a cataclysmic pole shift.  The result, while not based on any science, nonetheless provides a vivid and compelling picture of an Earth ravaged by flooding.

I recently spent the day at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena where the NEOWISE Mission has become the official asteroid hunter. According to Amy Mainzer (JPL, NEOWISE principal investigator), the mission has discovered 250 new objects including 72 near-Earth objects and four new comets. They have the task of documenting potentially hazardous near-Earth objects.

With all of this knowledge of future mapping, do the world’s financial leaders know something we don’t?nsider how many of the richest families have been grabbing up massive amounts of farmland around the world. All property is far away from coastal areas, and in locations conducive to self-survival, farming and coal mining.

Even a wealthy member of the Mormon church, David Hall reportedly has plans for 20,000 person self-sustained communities throughout the country, including the first in Vermont with a recent 900-acre farmland purchase. The communities will be called NewVistas.

Max.

"Ignorance is Bliss" - (Agent Smith the first Matrix Movie)

R.R. Book

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Re: Maps
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2017, 07:43:52 AM »
I've blown up the Southeastern and Northeastern portions of this map, as it is one of the most drastic predictions that I've seen:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H09xubq_q_8

« Last Edit: November 18, 2017, 07:59:06 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Maps
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2017, 02:12:46 PM »
I've blown up the Southeastern and Northeastern portions of this map, as it is one of the most drastic predictions that I've seen:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H09xubq_q_8
Thank you for that, as these types of maps have been printed for years, but I never seem to find one with detail, and yours has more than any so far.  How do you fare in PA?  Is your area near the inundation?

R.R. Book

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Re: Maps
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2017, 03:46:25 PM »
Hi Ilinda, We are at just under 1,000' elevation at the eastern edge of the Appalachians in what was historically called The Baron's Hills, and at the worst-case-scenario anticipate being on a minor island in an archipelago in the Aftertime, as the geological record of this area attests has happened in the ancient past here.  The islands do show up on every most-dire map when enlarged in Windows Paint, as well as on interactive on-line flood maps (see below map of sea level rise of 700').

I highly recommend that folks also research the geological history of their anticipated safe location via the state college geology department, as well as studying county and township maps denoting details that are not available on commercial maps, such as pipeline locations, rights of way, environmental rehabilitation sites, planned eminent domain projects, aquifer name, size and composition, and family names associated with area farms, etc. The more each of us knows about our area, the better grasp of our resources and challenges in the time ahead. 

Socrates

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Re: historical geology
« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2017, 03:30:58 AM »
I highly recommend that folks also research the geological history of their anticipated safe location via the state college geology department, as well as studying county and township maps denoting details that are not available on commercial maps, such as pipeline locations, rights of way, environmental rehabilitation sites, planned eminent domain projects, aquifer name, size and composition, and family names associated with area farms, etc. The more each of us knows about our area, the better grasp of our resources and challenges in the time ahead.
I agree. People get lost in numbers but geology (at least) is clear in this regard that large numbers are real ones; i mean, if an area has been safe for millions of years, then any occurances that come about every 10,000 years or so become moot. And if geological research shows that an area is stable, then you should be good.

Just to be clear: a few thousand years does not a safe place make; geologically speaking, a millennium is next-to-nothing. It may seem a lot to someone with a life expectancy of maybe 100 years, but from either a scientific or common sense point of view, a century is 'less than a blink of an eye' in the larger scope of things.
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R.R. Book

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Re: Maps
« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2017, 07:02:00 AM »
Absolutely - when we speak of geological record, the Pleistocene may be the most recent era that would be relevant (2.6 mil to 11,700 years ago).  For example, in my own research, I learned one important fact: the foothills in our area were not part of the original Appalachian range, but rather slammed into it after breaking away from another land mass.  Though the topography appears seamless from the ground, there is actually an inactive faultline where the collision occurred.  That is the record of east-west motion.  The record of north-south motion adds that we are at the southern tip of stable New England bedrock which also may be separate from the Appalachians - good to know these things  :)

ilinda

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Re: Maps
« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2017, 03:54:32 PM »
Absolutely - when we speak of geological record, the Pleistocene may be the most recent era that would be relevant (2.6 mil to 11,700 years ago).  For example, in my own research, I learned one important fact: the foothills in our area were not part of the original Appalachian range, but rather slammed into it after breaking away from another land mass.  Though the topography appears seamless from the ground, there is actually an inactive faultline where the collision occurred.  That is the record of east-west motion.  The record of north-south motion adds that we are at the southern tip of stable New England bedrock which also may be separate from the Appalachians - good to know these things  :)
Do you think/know your faultline is a deep one?    The "Black Fault" which underlies our farm and parallels the creek that parallels our road, is known as being centered deep, rather than a surface fault such as San Andreas, which is visible from air.

R.R. Book

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Re: Maps
« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2017, 05:14:53 PM »
The fault itself could only be considered visible in that there is an obvious steep decline from the Honey Brook Massif, which is the geological name for the Baron's Hills.  A massif is a mountain that stands on its own, apart from another system, and moves alone as an unbreakable unit during seismic activity.  The fault lies at the bottom of the massif on the northwest corner where it adjoins the eastern Appalachians via a valley of Amish folk.  For their sake, I hope that the fault remains stable - the stability of abutting bedrock to the north of the massif could help to hold the area together.  Oddly, the only geographer to note that fault was a Frenchman who wrote about it in French, and thanks to the Internet it has been translated.  None of the state college geographers have ever mentioned it.

Floodwaters would be expected to accumulate below us to the south and east, where the Piedmont Upland eventually becomes coastal plain and tidal bore up larger rivers may occur.  Interestingly, rivers on all sides of the massif terminate in every direction near us as springs, so we have the benefit of lots of water but all running downhill away from here.

Is a centered deep fault more stable?
« Last Edit: November 19, 2017, 05:27:54 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Maps
« Reply #9 on: November 20, 2017, 04:55:55 PM »
The fault itself could only be considered visible in that there is an obvious steep decline from the Honey Brook Massif, which is the geological name for the Baron's Hills.  A massif is a mountain that stands on its own, apart from another system, and moves alone as an unbreakable unit during seismic activity.  The fault lies at the bottom of the massif on the northwest corner where it adjoins the eastern Appalachians via a valley of Amish folk.  For their sake, I hope that the fault remains stable - the stability of abutting bedrock to the north of the massif could help to hold the area together.  Oddly, the only geographer to note that fault was a Frenchman who wrote about it in French, and thanks to the Internet it has been translated.  None of the state college geographers have ever mentioned it.

Floodwaters would be expected to accumulate below us to the south and east, where the Piedmont Upland eventually becomes coastal plain and tidal bore up larger rivers may occur.  Interestingly, rivers on all sides of the massif terminate in every direction near us as springs, so we have the benefit of lots of water but all running downhill away from here.

Is a centered deep fault more stable?
I don't know for certain if deep faults are more stable than surface ones, but thinking of the San Andreas and how it shakes and quakes at low levels off and on constantly, and that the deep Black Fault only shakes occasionally, it is likely (in my mind) that deep faults are more stable. 

The Black Fault is what they call a "subsidence fault", and from studying the maps, it appears on the west side is where it subsides or slumps downward during quaking, whereas east side could actually rise, or remain same.  Probably won't know till it happens, although, I have noticed there are large plate-like boulders up in our woods that must have been thrust upward at one time, or one side "fell", because these boulder-plates are arranged "on edge", as if they were placed on their edges, a feat of sorts.

Your description of your local geology says you have studied it extensively and know what's under you.  Did you teach geology!?

R.R. Book

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Re: Maps
« Reply #10 on: November 20, 2017, 06:57:35 PM »
Hi Ilinda,

Am married to a geologist!  It sounds as if you know your geography very well too.  I was partly relieved for you all when Dutchsinse said the other day that some of the the strain had been transferred away from your area due to, unfortunately, fracking further west.   :)

ilinda

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Re: Maps
« Reply #11 on: November 21, 2017, 04:09:48 PM »
Hi Ilinda,

Am married to a geologist!  It sounds as if you know your geography very well too.  I was partly relieved for you all when Dutchsinse said the other day that some of the the strain had been transferred away from your area due to, unfortunately, fracking further west.   :)
Same here.  Now to determine how much strain he is talking about.  It has been proven that fracking, especially in Oklahoma, is related to subsequent earthquakes.  They have solid data relating the two, but alas, fracking continues.  As Marshall reminds us, "this chapter is theirs".

R.R. Book

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Re: Maps
« Reply #12 on: November 21, 2017, 04:51:25 PM »
Am keeping it in prayer, as all of my brothers are located there.

 

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