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Author Topic: CIVILISATION REBOOT priorties  (Read 8553 times)

Socrates

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the 3 key elements to civilisation
« Reply #15 on: March 09, 2017, 10:35:42 PM »
Pegs... One hears things but they don't compute. Then it's in one ear and out the other. And just so it is with the endless facets of prepping and linked considerations. It's easy to not be able to see the forest for the trees, let alone to have a clear idea of what has the highest priority. So here's my (very) short list of 'civilisation reboot' considerations (keeping in mind that it's not a prepping short list, which would invariably need contain items like location).

1, 2 & 3, in no particular order of significance; it's a trinity of things you can't do without and ignorance of which has indeed caused our modern age's self-destructive character:
- give babies unconditional love and care; then you will have sane, courageous and intelligent adults later on. The alternative is getting traumatized, fearful, stupid adults.
- apply the Billings Method, both for planning/postponing pregnancy as well as for determining gender.
- understand how soil is created; understanding this, you will not cut down trees to create fields, you will not let your herbivores decimate the environment & you'll be able to apply tactics that both manage and create more of it.


There is (much) more to say but if you just respected the above 3 rules, mankind in the next age could turn out completely differently and come to live in a global paradise rather than in the (self-)destructive, merciless, belligerent, unnatural and subhuman age we all grew up in and were forced to come to terms with in our own lifetimes.
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« Last Edit: June 13, 2017, 01:04:15 PM by Socrates »
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Socrates

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Re: making concrete and concrete-like compounds
« Reply #16 on: January 23, 2020, 05:33:58 PM »
CONCRETE; don't make little of this. After the Romans were defeated and their knowledge of how to make cement was lost, it took Europe 1500 years [!] to reinvent the stuff.
Now, concrete is simple enough but even simpler is hempcrete. So here are both recipes:
CEMENT: shale and limestone are found just about everywhere. Cement is powdered shale and limestone at a ratio of 20 to 80%; roast at very high temperatures [1600 celsius] and then powder again.
HEMPCRETE: harvest hemp and take the fibers OUT of it, leaving the 'hurd', the inner part. When this is combined with quicklime [roasted and then hydrated limestone] the combination petrifies to make a concrete-like substance that is as strong as concrete but much lighter. As well, since limestone is a relatively soft rock, hempcrete requires much less effort to make than cement [create quicklime by burning limestone with coal, then add water].
Just ran into another great youtube resource and he has two great vids on making Roman concrete and a variation using brick instead of pumice / volcanic rock.
This is great info, for making the calcium hydroxide isn't that big a deal; either limestone or shells are commonly found all over the world and roasting limestone / shells doesn't even take that much heat. Then add water, then let it evaporate so you get the white powder you use for building. In this case mix this with crushed bricks or other.

I'd like to add that while watching this i'm envisioning how i might build a dam with such technology, a powerful tool for taking advantage of a location's water. I built a few tiny dams while i was on La Gomera and being able to direct the way water flows is an awesome tool. As well, i tried redirecting water using things like big walls of rocks, but then one learns very quickly that water will find a way to push through no matter how much mud, sticks or other. I learned from experience how important it is to be able to arrest the water's power properly; hard work and wishful thinking will not let you control the flow. This is really the reason why i get excited about concrete and concrete-like materials.
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ilinda

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Re: making concrete and concrete-like compounds
« Reply #17 on: January 23, 2020, 06:12:19 PM »
CONCRETE; don't make little of this. After the Romans were defeated and their knowledge of how to make cement was lost, it took Europe 1500 years [!] to reinvent the stuff.
Now, concrete is simple enough but even simpler is hempcrete. So here are both recipes:
CEMENT: shale and limestone are found just about everywhere. Cement is powdered shale and limestone at a ratio of 20 to 80%; roast at very high temperatures [1600 celsius] and then powder again.
HEMPCRETE: harvest hemp and take the fibers OUT of it, leaving the 'hurd', the inner part. When this is combined with quicklime [roasted and then hydrated limestone] the combination petrifies to make a concrete-like substance that is as strong as concrete but much lighter. As well, since limestone is a relatively soft rock, hempcrete requires much less effort to make than cement [create quicklime by burning limestone with coal, then add water].
Just ran into another great youtube resource and he has two great vids on making Roman concrete and a variation using brick instead of pumice / volcanic rock.
This is great info, for making the calcium hydroxide isn't that big a deal; either limestone or shells are commonly found all over the world and roasting limestone / shells doesn't even take that much heat. Then add water, then let it evaporate so you get the white powder you use for building. In this case mix this with crushed bricks or other.

I'd like to add that while watching this i'm envisioning how i might build a dam with such technology, a powerful tool for taking advantage of a location's water. I built a few tiny dams while i was on La Gomera and being able to direct the way water flows is an awesome tool. As well, i tried redirecting water using things like big walls of rocks, but then one learns very quickly that water will find a way to push through no matter how much mud, sticks or other. I learned from experience how important it is to be able to arrest the water's power properly; hard work and wishful thinking will not let you control the flow. This is really the reason why i get excited about concrete and concrete-like materials.
This info., especially on making your own cement, is worth printing out and saving in a folder.  About 20 or so years ago hubby built a tiny, approximately 4" high dam on our main creek, which itself is small and only about 12' wide on average. 

It was amazing how that little dam changed upstream and downstream for the better, and the dam lasted all those years until a major flood event a couple of years ago broke in half one of the boulders that constituted part of the dam itself.  He used concrete to hold the rocks in place, but it would be really nice to know how to make your own, on-site, concrete, if a trip to the nearest building supply place isn't possible.

Socrates

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Re: the importance of 'concrete' for water control
« Reply #18 on: January 24, 2020, 07:16:00 AM »
One of the main tenets of permaculture is slowing down the flow of water, the exact opposite of modern agricultural techniques that just flood fields and orchards to let it drain away [often through sandy soil] quickly.
Dams, terraces and swales are therefore permaculture's bread and butter. We don't talk about such things nowadays because cement is so readily available and cheap.
Like i've mentioned earlier, i went to buy a big bag of cement, and even on La Gomera this was 3 bucks. Now imagine how far that heavy load had to be transported before it got to the Canaries! And despite all of the intense heat that goes into making cement and all the power that goes into crushing shale into powder, it's still only 3 bucks for a sack of cement so big it's hard to get off the ground...

We are spoiled and so we never think about how we'd fare if there were no cement to be had. But if you do think about it and think about all of the important things done with concrete, the importance of knowing how to make cement yourself should be clear.
Hell, no one even talks about it online; it took me many hours of research until i finally found a website explaining how Portland cement is made. No one cares since... it's just there...
Just take a conscious look around you: tiles, walls, roads... concrete everywhere! But no one knows how cement is made.
Future generations may rightfully deem us insane.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2020, 03:49:50 PM by Socrates »
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R.R. Book

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Re: CIVILISATION REBOOT priorties
« Reply #19 on: January 24, 2020, 09:33:48 AM »
Soc, you had mentioned the correct proportions of powdered shale and lime for cement.  Can you remember the amount of water?  I've mixed packaged cement before, but without the packaging, would need to write this on a recipe card.  :)


Memo: From the kitchen of Socrates

Socrates

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Re: volumes / recipe
« Reply #20 on: January 24, 2020, 03:58:26 PM »
I think you're confusing cement with concrete...

Cement is made by crushing limestone and shale to powder; mix at a ratio of 80 to 20%.
This mix is then to be roasted, i believe at 1600 degrees Celsius [2900 Fahrenheit], which is usually done in a slightly angled very long oven [i think those things are 60 meters in length [i.e. 190 ']. This oven slowly rotates and the powders slowly work their way downward. The shale and limestone fuse together and the end result again needs to be crushed to powder. This is your cement.

To make concrete, there are many recipes. The one i like because it has worked for me and is very easy to remember goes like this:
- 1 part cement
- 2 parts sand
- 4 parts gravel and rocks
Mix until you have something you can pour but as dry as possible, i.e. it's really hard to say how much water to use. You just guestimate based on the consistency of the mix. This is not rocket science. Just be careful not to add too much water, because then you'll have to add more cement, sand and gravel to compensate.

A guy i used to know online worked in concrete for his entire career and he shared with me some important insights. One is that concrete may need weeks or longer to cure completely, but that 90% of the curing takes place in a few days.
Of course if you're using huge amounts of concrete, it's a totally different story, as the engineers building the Hoover Dam learned... They had to pour column by column, letting the concrete dry in one column before pouring the next one, otherwise the stuff would take years to cure, if it ever did. I thought this was very useful information since it means you're not doomed if you need to pour concrete in a hurry [like if you know the sh!t's gonna hit the fan very soon but you still need to work on your shelter or something].

Another thing i learned from him is that so-called ultra high strength concrete really isn't that special and that it's used for building high rises because it takes up less space and dries quicker. However, if you just pour more concrete, you'll get similar strength; it'll just be bulkier, heavier and take longer to dry.

And check out this amazing vid by Green Power Science working with pure cement to get a shiny finish.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2020, 04:27:49 PM by Socrates »
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R.R. Book

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Re: CIVILISATION REBOOT priorties
« Reply #21 on: January 25, 2020, 05:27:18 AM »
Thanks for all the details Soc!

Socrates

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Re: concrete recipes
« Reply #22 on: February 03, 2020, 11:18:50 AM »
Great vid by an engineer on strength and viscosity of concrete mixes.
Since the example [above link goes to time stamp] shows that dry concrete mixes result in an end product that is 150% stronger, this is worth you time, effort and costs in many situations.
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