Being In It for the Species The Kolbrin Bible Complete Danjeon Breathing System 
Surviving the Planet X Tribulation

Author Topic: SEEDS...  (Read 26680 times)

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7237
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #150 on: January 27, 2019, 05:10:00 PM »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ofHSamdvTw

At around 5:00 into this film, Christian of Ice Age Farmer makes a remarkable observation about saving seeds:

When you grow a crop from seed on your own land and then save seeds from the crop for next year, those seeds that experienced year one on your land are gifted with add-on genetic information about what the next crop needs to know about your growing conditions in order to survive.

The name for that is epigenetics, which we've discussed elsewhere on Town Hall, but not so much in context of plants.  The result is your own landrace of that particular species.


ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3566
  • Karma: +32/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #151 on: January 27, 2019, 05:24:26 PM »
That is exactly something people should be very aware of, in case Monsanto or another of the gene giants tries to stake a claim on something some one is growing, and claims it's theirs.

Each time you grow it on your land, the epigenetics of it continues to change from its original state, more evidence on your side that the overall genetic complement, especially the epigenetics, are unique and different from that of any GM crop.

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7237
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #152 on: January 27, 2019, 05:43:43 PM »
That's a good rationale against corporate patenting of seeds Ilinda!

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7237
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #153 on: February 24, 2019, 07:08:47 PM »
Using the rationale of selecting seeds for the earliest possible production, so that harvesting can be done in advance of disease onset, climate cooling, loss to insects, etc., here are some interesting early producing tomato seeds that I found.  All are small-to-medium indeterminates or semi-determinates* for faster harvesting:

Glacier, certified organic from High Mowing Seeds and Wood Prairie Farm, 55-61 days


Cosmonaut Volkov: A Russian heirloom, certified organic from Wood Prairie Farm,
65 days


Bloody Butcher: certified organic from Sustainable Seed Company, 55 days


Stupice: Czechoslovakian variety, certified organic from Seed Savers Exchange, 55-70 days


*Vocabulary for those who may be new to tomato growing:
determinate: tomatoes that ripen all at the same time, for canning, etc.

semi-determinate: short-vine tomatoes that ripen in staggered spurts

indeterminate: long vine tomatoes that ripen over a whole season

What are you planting this year?
« Last Edit: February 25, 2019, 05:22:29 AM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7237
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #154 on: February 25, 2019, 03:30:33 PM »
Have mentioned already that due to high moisture in our climate, it is very difficult to grow curcubits here (squash, etc.).

There is some discussion about an unusual variety, however, called Calabash or bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria), that might actually survive a damp climate and not succumb to disease, so I'm planning to give it a try:


One key difference between climbing bottle gourd and bushy zucchini is the need for a trellis

It is said to begin producing a crop within two months, so it would be appropriate for the shorter growing season in the north. 

Though it's not to be confused with the closely related but wrinkly Bitter Gourd with possibly toxic juice, the pulp seed cover of bottle gourd will produce a purge and should be avoided. 

There appear to be a couple of sub-species of the actual bottle gourd, one shaped more like a container gourd, and the one depicted above shaped more like a normal zucchini, sometimes called "long bottle gourd."  Beyond the English and Latin names for this vegetable, there are many other names for it around the world, as it is better known outside North America even though the crop has been grown in more southerly locations on this continent in some places for 8,000 years.

Here's a bottle gourd curry:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calabash

I have found seeds available both through Etsy and Ebay, often with free shipping.

More from PFAF:

https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Lagenaria+Siceraria
« Last Edit: February 25, 2019, 06:26:35 PM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7237
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #155 on: February 25, 2019, 04:33:32 PM »
Readers may be familiar with the popular miniature sweet peppers that are now being cultivated, not to be confused with ornamental miniature peppers, which are full of seeds and considered not worth trying to eat.  The edible miniature peppers mature more quickly than full-sized ones, which makes them worth planting in the north, with its shorter growing season. 

I also like the prospect of not needing to do as much work to cut these into smaller pieces for stir fries, etc. as would need to be done to cut up full-sized bell peppers.  And even though they're small, they can still be stuffed for luscious bite-sized treats.

The short bushes would also make a nice container plant for those with less garden space.  Peppers are perennials as long as they are brought indoors in the north in winter, and being in a container would facilitate that.

I found these organic varieties.  Besides seeking either an organic or a non-GMO label, I also look for heirloom seeds, or at least non-hybrids:

Bangles Blend: Organic from High Mowing Seeds; 60 days to green stage (longer to turn other colors)


Klari Baby Cheese: Organic heirlooms from Wood Prairie Farm, 65 days to green stage and slightly larger @ 3" than Bangles.



« Last Edit: February 25, 2019, 06:23:42 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3566
  • Karma: +32/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #156 on: February 25, 2019, 07:03:48 PM »
Those are the cutest little peppers, and I must be out of the loop as they're new to me.  Am thinking of how very easy they would freeze if you just had too many to eat at once.  After removing the stem and seeds, it's just one slice through the middle, then ready for freezer bag.

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7237
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #157 on: February 26, 2019, 05:00:22 AM »
I never thought of that!  Would they retain their texture?

ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3566
  • Karma: +32/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #158 on: February 26, 2019, 06:06:31 PM »
The sweet red Lemme' pepper that I grow does.  I either sun-dry them or freeze them, and sometimes both.  The Lemme' is a thin-walled pepper which makes it ideal for preservation, as there isn't a thick slab of flesh to dry out.

Ordinarily I have bags and bags of Lemme' pepper pieces in the freezer.  I usually slice into them vertically to remove the seeds, then slice across to create small and easy-to-dry pieces, and since they grow from 8-13" long, there may be many pieces per pepper.  But those little miniatures look to be easy to process.

The reason we are out of Lemme' this year is because they were mostly shaded by walls I did not realize were tall enough to block sunlight, and thus we harvested very few last summer.

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7237
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #159 on: February 27, 2019, 05:53:25 AM »
Found this info on Lemme at Sand Hill Preservation, but couldn't find a photo:

Quote
Lemme’s Italian- 71 days- Italian Frying-type pepper.  Fatter and shorter in size than Italian Frying and Jimmy Nardello.  Excellent eaten fresh.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2019, 09:20:03 AM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7237
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #160 on: February 27, 2019, 05:56:45 AM »
Posting a pepper "heat" index:


ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3566
  • Karma: +32/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #161 on: February 27, 2019, 06:56:56 PM »
Found this info on Lemme at Sand Hill Preservation, but couldn't find a photo:

Quote
Lemme’s Italian- 71 days- Italian Frying-type pepper.  Fatter and shorter in size than Italian Frying and Jimmy Nardello.  Excellent eaten fresh.
One time a friend and I did a pepper tasting event which featured the Jimmy Nardello that he grew and the Lemme' that I grew.  It was sort of a toss-up as to taste--both good--but the thing I noticed is that they also looked identical.

 I have suspected since then, that they may actually be one and the same.  Until someone does the genetics I guess they can retain their separate names.

Solani

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 235
  • Karma: +13/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #162 on: February 27, 2019, 09:43:42 PM »
For the past 2 years I have been stocking up and buying seeds from a Ukrainian vegetable farm as well as from a Russian vegetable farm. They live in a climate that is a bit colder than where we are in Canada and I've been buying from them for that reason. It is seeds from their own crops which they have grown for many years. I am hoping that they will be able to survive the colder temperatures. It just makes more sense buying seeds that are already used to the cold and not GMO, and not buy seeds that have been grown for generations in warmer climates. I will be trying some of them this summer and compare to other seeds that I also will plant, that are from a warmer climate zone. Not a hot climate, just warmer than what we experience here. That will be one of my "science projects" this summer. One among many... LOL

//Solani
~In order to determine what is possible, one only needs to step out into what is considered impossible and look around...~
*******************************
~I am no longer accepting the things I cannot change... I am changing the things I cannot accept~
*******************************

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7237
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #163 on: February 28, 2019, 03:57:57 AM »
What are you planting this year up there, Solani?

Looking forward to more details, as your project unfolds  :)




R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7237
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #164 on: February 28, 2019, 04:57:47 AM »
That might explain why a photo was so difficult to find.

 

Surviving the Planet X Tribulation: A Faith-Based Leadership Guide

Radio Free Earth: Community Preparedness and Two Way Radios

BUY NOW

In a post-global disaster world, predators and tyrants will have the best two-way radios, and they'll use them to surveil you at a comfortable distance.

What will you have? Signal flares and red bandannas?

If so, when you least expect it, the predators and tyrants will come to take a spoil and they will torture, rape, and kill without mercy.

This is why Radio Free Earth authors Marshall Masters and Duane W. Brayton have an urgent message for everyone with a serious interest in preparedness. That being, analog RF (radio frequency) is the heartbeat of freedom. Accept no substitutes.

Watch our free videos to learn how to stay safe and free with an affordable strategy for two way communication, both near and far.

Welcome to Radio
Free Earth

Why Radio
Free Earth

Post-Disaster
Communications

Citizens Band Radios
for Survival

BUY NOW