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Author Topic: SEEDS...  (Read 27799 times)

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #165 on: February 28, 2019, 12:43:44 PM »
Yes, Solani, keep us posted about your growouts and results.  Excellent science project.

Solani

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #166 on: March 02, 2019, 01:33:39 PM »
What are you planting this year up there, Solani?

Looking forward to more details, as your project unfolds  :)



Well, if we ever do get summer here...  ??? We still have over 3 feet of snow and even if the day time temps creep up above freezing, nighttime temps are still around -28 Celsius.  :o My brain is to fried right now to figure it out in Fahrenheit...  :P

Don't know how many weeks now the weather forecaster has "promised" above freezing temperatures. This week we were supposed to have around 38 F  and next week we were predicted to have up to 43 F... (only reason I know these temps in F, is that Dan has everything on his computer set to Fahrenheit and I have mine set to Celsius... LOL) But, as usual that changed and the coming week, we're supposed to be back down to -32 C AGAIN... Oh well, get used to it A??  :-X Yes, I have found myself using the typical Canadian "A?" more and more often. Does that mean I'm easily influenced??  ;D

Anyhow, this is what I have planed so far....

I’ll be planting the usual such as:

Lettuce
Spinach
Cabbage
Broccoli
Carrots
Green Beans
Snow Peas
Sweet peppers, various colors
Hot peppers
Tomatoes for canning
Potatoes
Winter Squash (not sure which one yet)
Luffas (gourds) This will be a first time “science project”. (They're for my bath and body products, body/bath scrubbers in natural/organic soap bars)

Will most likely plant more veggies but this is my main crop.

Most likely, no onions this year but will be planting garlic in the fall.


The new seeds that I have bought from Russia and the Ukraine that I will be trying out, will be:
Cabbage
Broccoli
Carrots
Squash (same type as I’ll be planting the seeds from a warmer climate)
Sweet and hot Peppers
Tomatoes for canning

I’ll be planting my vegetable gardens in raised beds, same soil/nutrient mixtures for the colder climate seeds and the warmer. I’ll also be interested to see if there will be any “cross-pollination”, if I’m able to see any differences or likenesses between them, from the seeds that I’ll be saving for next years crops.

I’ve bought new seeds for the “warmer” climate seeds/veggies too. But I will also be planting seeds that I’ve harvested from previous years crops.

I lost my two first crops of potatoes last summer or, rather 1 ½ since a few potato plants did survive, even if they were scrawny. My third crop which I planted much later in the season, didn’t give much and what I did get was very small potatoes, so, I’ve had to buy most of my potatoes this year. Same with my tomatoes, peas and peppers.

So, this year, I’m going to plant my potatoes in “buckets” with plastic bag liners and bring them in during the nights, until I’m SURE that the nighttime temps won’t go below freezing and then I’ll dig holes the same size as the plastic bags in my big tire potato beds/planters, carefully remove the plastic bags and plop them down into the prepared soil. I’ll be planting potatoes the “usual” way too, but I don’t want to lose everything again. I’ve also bought cheap mylar blankets off of eBay, that I can spread out over the raised beds if I need to. Guess we’ll have to see how things work out. I’ve used straw previously and it has worked good but last year was much colder than usual. So, this year, I'll add an extra protection of the Mylar/space blankets on top of the straw!!

On an interesting note… I had missed 2 potatoes in 2 of my big tire planters (1 in each) that had been in the tire/soil all winter with just the regular covering of straw and even if the new potatoes that I planted in those tires froze when their leaves had come up, the old potatoes from the previous season survived… So, I did keep about 8 of those potatoes to use as seed potatoes this year. Want to see if they somehow have become more resistant to colder temperatures. Reason I knew they were from the previous summer was that they were red potatoes and I’d planted white potatoes in those tires last summer.

//Solani
~In order to determine what is possible, one only needs to step out into what is considered impossible and look around...~
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~I am no longer accepting the things I cannot change... I am changing the things I cannot accept~
*******************************

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #167 on: March 02, 2019, 02:10:10 PM »
We're about to be hit again with another heavy snow this weekend here too.

It's pretty but does get old, doesn't it?

Love the "His" and "Hers" computers with degrees F and C!

Quote
Yes, I have found myself using the typical Canadian "A?" more and more often. Does that mean I'm easily influenced?? 

Methinks you're becoming a dyed-in-the-wool Canuck!  :)

Hope you'll share details about your Russian and Ukrainian suppliers when you're able. 

Have you ever heard of Richters up there?  They are one of my favorite mail-order suppliers of permaculture rootstock, medicinal herbs, etc.



https://www.richters.com/
« Last Edit: March 02, 2019, 04:49:55 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #168 on: March 02, 2019, 05:23:07 PM »
Had the same luck here with potatoes, as did Solani.  I did a couple of late plantings and one was harvested and resulted in scrawny little potatoes, not worth digging, so I left the others in their bed, and pulled off the tops, then added thick mulch for the winter.  Hopefully some will resprout this spring. 

However the all around most versatile potato, IMHO, is the Purple Peruvian.  While it's a fingerling and somewhat smaller than those huge bakers, they are so nutritious and tasty as well.  Plus the Peruvians say they use them mainly for thickening soups and other dishes.  I dice them and stir fry with onion or shallot, garlic, sweet red pepper, and either carrot or sweet potatoes or parsnips.  Makes a nice winter dish.

The decent Purple Peruvian I did manage to harvest at a decent size are being saved for planting this spring, and none will be eaten--all planted.

Solani

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #169 on: March 02, 2019, 05:26:11 PM »
We're about to be hit again with another heavy snow this weekend here too.

It's pretty but does get old, doesn't it?

Yes, I'm quite over it by now too, but then I stop and think... This is just the beginning of what is to come if there will be a mini ice age.  :o Not sure which will be worse, flash frozen or instantly burnt to a crisp?? Oh well, with me being the way I am and if there is a "heaven", I think I'm destined to going "down-stairs". So... I'll go with the flash frozen, that way I don't have to burn twice. I think one time would be quite enough, thank you very much! Yes, I'm joking about serious matters, it's my way of psychologically coping with things that I'm really not looking forward to having to do, but still fully prepared to deal with whatever, when it happens. Same as I joke around in regards to my PTSD and my "demons". If I can get to the point of where I can joke about something (that has to do with myself and no one else. I'd never crack jokes about someone else's mishaps) I can easier deal with what's going on or, I'm about to face.

Quote
Love the "His" and "Hers" computers with degrees F and C!

Yep, it's not only the "his and her" computers with F vs. C it's also I have military time (24 hours) on my computer clock. Dan has the AM/PM time. Also our table top weather stations. On Dan's side of the kitchen table his weather station is in F and on my side, mine is C... It drives him nuts...  ;D :P

Quote
Yes, I have found myself using the typical Canadian "A?" more and more often. Does that mean I'm easily influenced?? 

Quote
Methinks you're becoming a dyed-in-the-wool Canuck!  :)

LOL, Naaa, I'm just a chameleon and pick up on what the majority of people around me do or how they talk, such as dialects. Years ago when I'd be talking on the phone with my adopted cousin from way up north in Sweden, where they have a very heavy northern dialect, my son if he'd walk by would just say. Oh, you're talking to Inger... I switch accents/dialects depending on who I'm talking to and what dialect they have. I don't do it consciously, it just happens.  I also have a easy time learning new languages and don't have an accent in any of the languages I speak, I do however within a few days pick up the dialect of wherever I am. I remember some years ago someone saying that I have a "musical ear" and that could have something to do with it. Same as picking out tunes on the piano, harmonica/whatever and also singing. I love to sing when I'm all alone in the woods and also when I'm trying to calm down or sooth an injured or stressed animal, be it wild or tame, I'll hum/sing without words in different tones. Have used that on the injured ravens I've taken care of out here and either I bore them to tears or they just want to shut me off, cause they'll go to sleep...   ::)

Quote
Hope you'll share details about your Russian and Ukrainian suppliers when you're able. 

Yes, will do. I found them first on eBay but have since bought directly from them.

Quote
Have you ever heard of Richters up there?  They are one of my favorite mail-order suppliers of permaculture rootstock, medicinal herbs, etc.



https://www.richters.com/

Yes, but I haven't bought anything from them yet. I have seen a few seed packs that I haven't been able to find anywhere else that I've been thinking about buying from them.

//Solani
~In order to determine what is possible, one only needs to step out into what is considered impossible and look around...~
*******************************
~I am no longer accepting the things I cannot change... I am changing the things I cannot accept~
*******************************

Solani

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #170 on: March 02, 2019, 05:30:28 PM »
Had the same luck here with potatoes, as did Solani.  I did a couple of late plantings and one was harvested and resulted in scrawny little potatoes, not worth digging, so I left the others in their bed, and pulled off the tops, then added thick mulch for the winter.  Hopefully some will resprout this spring. 

However the all around most versatile potato, IMHO, is the Purple Peruvian.  While it's a fingerling and somewhat smaller than those huge bakers, they are so nutritious and tasty as well.  Plus the Peruvians say they use them mainly for thickening soups and other dishes.  I dice them and stir fry with onion or shallot, garlic, sweet red pepper, and either carrot or sweet potatoes or parsnips.  Makes a nice winter dish.

The decent Purple Peruvian I did manage to harvest at a decent size are being saved for planting this spring, and none will be eaten--all planted.

I've never tried the Purple Peruvian. I'll have to see if I can find seed potatoes for them here. I've also thought of planting sweet potatoes but, I'm not sure it would be warm enough up here, since from what I've heard, you're supposed to let them sit outside in the warmth for a few weeks after you've harvested them? and that is what turns them sweet?? Or, is that wrong?

//Solani
~In order to determine what is possible, one only needs to step out into what is considered impossible and look around...~
*******************************
~I am no longer accepting the things I cannot change... I am changing the things I cannot accept~
*******************************

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #171 on: March 02, 2019, 06:42:15 PM »
Quote
I think I'm destined to going "down-stairs"

Highly doubtful that a person who was dealt a not-so-ideal hand, then managed to overcome it to learn advanced spiritual skills with which to help others would be wasted in such a manner... That would constitute unproductive use of human resources on the part of heavenly PTB IMHO :)

Quote
Yep, it's not only the "his and her" computers with F vs. C it's also I have military time (24 hours) on my computer clock. Dan has the AM/PM time. Also our table top weather stations. On Dan's side of the kitchen table his weather station is in F and on my side, mine is C... It drives him nuts...

Is there a Line of Demarcation across the middle of the kitchen?  LOL!

Quote
LOL, Naaa, I'm just a chameleon and pick up on what the majority of people around me do or how they talk, such as dialects. Years ago when I'd be talking on the phone with my adopted cousin from way up north in Sweden, where they have a very heavy northern dialect, my son if he'd walk by would just say. Oh, you're talking to Inger... I switch accents/dialects depending on who I'm talking to and what dialect they have. I don't do it consciously, it just happens.  I also have a easy time learning new languages and don't have an accent in any of the languages I speak, I do however within a few days pick up the dialect of wherever I am. I remember some years ago someone saying that I have a "musical ear" and that could have something to do with it. Same as picking out tunes on the piano, harmonica/whatever and also singing. I love to sing when I'm all alone in the woods and also when I'm trying to calm down or sooth an injured or stressed animal, be it wild or tame, I'll hum/sing without words in different tones. Have used that on the injured ravens I've taken care of out here and either I bore them to tears or they just want to shut me off, cause they'll go to sleep...

Two more chapters in your book right in that paragraph...maybe some day?

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #172 on: March 03, 2019, 05:26:16 AM »
Ilinda, How well have your P.P's overwintered?

The rest of mine that weren't already cooked rotted in the root cellar this winter...am thinking they might have been better off left in the ground?

Solani

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #173 on: March 03, 2019, 12:03:40 PM »

Quote
Is there a Line of Demarcation across the middle of the kitchen?  LOL!

Hahaha... Nope, it's more like, the whole kitchen is MINE... and he has permission to be in control of his side of the kitchen table.... LOL On the other hand, the living room is his, I don't even clean in there. Not after he "b*tched" at me when he couldn't find a book that I had MOVED...  :o Turned out he himself, had brought it upstairs and put it in a box of other books he'd decided he "could" move to a different location...

I very seldom spend any time in the living room. The wood heater is in there and Dan is constantly freezing so, it's way to hot in there. I've tried to "fatten" him up so he could have at least a thin layer of fat as insulation but, the dude even if he has gained a few pounds after I moved in, is a very picky eater and eats miniature portions... None of his previous wives have been able to put weight on him... Yep, he did tell me that! LOL I guess I'm a good cook!  ;D I don't watch TV and if there is anything I would want to watch, I'll watch it on my computer in MY kitchen... He also has a "bad habit" of switching channels when he feels like it, and that really yanks my chain... So, it's his room...  ::)


Quote
LOL, Naaa, I'm just a chameleon and pick up on what the majority of people around me do or how they talk, such as dialects. Years ago when I'd be talking on the phone with my adopted cousin from way up north in Sweden, where they have a very heavy northern dialect, my son if he'd walk by would just say. Oh, you're talking to Inger... I switch accents/dialects depending on who I'm talking to and what dialect they have. I don't do it consciously, it just happens.  I also have a easy time learning new languages and don't have an accent in any of the languages I speak, I do however within a few days pick up the dialect of wherever I am. I remember some years ago someone saying that I have a "musical ear" and that could have something to do with it. Same as picking out tunes on the piano, harmonica/whatever and also singing. I love to sing when I'm all alone in the woods and also when I'm trying to calm down or sooth an injured or stressed animal, be it wild or tame, I'll hum/sing without words in different tones. Have used that on the injured ravens I've taken care of out here and either I bore them to tears or they just want to shut me off, cause they'll go to sleep...

Quote
Two more chapters in your book right in that paragraph...maybe some day?

LOL!!  :P

//Solani
~In order to determine what is possible, one only needs to step out into what is considered impossible and look around...~
*******************************
~I am no longer accepting the things I cannot change... I am changing the things I cannot accept~
*******************************

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #174 on: March 03, 2019, 04:44:40 PM »
Ilinda, How well have your P.P's overwintered?

The rest of mine that weren't already cooked rotted in the root cellar this winter...am thinking they might have been better off left in the ground?
Soo sorry your P.P.'s rotted.  Makes you wonder if your root cellar was colder this year than usual?

My P.P.'s are in a covered box in a cold, unheated back room, that is usually between 38 and 50 during the winter time.  I check them periodically and they feel firm and look nice and dark purple, almost black.  This is my best batch of "seed Purple Peruvians" ever, probably because I knew not to eat any of the "keepers", but save them for planting.

I would/could never leave potatoes in the ground if they were the only ones I was counting on for planting.  But if they were like the ones I DID leave in ground, it's OK, as it's a gamble since they were planted late and didn't produce much.  One reason I don't ordinarily leave potatoes in ground in winter is field mice, voles, rats, or whatever, will eat them.  The other thing is if their cover is too thin, they might freeze and rot.  Parsnips can be left in ground in areas where wildlife don't dig/eat them, because they are much more cold tolerant than potatoes.

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #175 on: March 03, 2019, 04:55:40 PM »
Had the same luck here with potatoes, as did Solani.  I did a couple of late plantings and one was harvested and resulted in scrawny little potatoes, not worth digging, so I left the others in their bed, and pulled off the tops, then added thick mulch for the winter.  Hopefully some will resprout this spring. 

However the all around most versatile potato, IMHO, is the Purple Peruvian.  While it's a fingerling and somewhat smaller than those huge bakers, they are so nutritious and tasty as well.  Plus the Peruvians say they use them mainly for thickening soups and other dishes.  I dice them and stir fry with onion or shallot, garlic, sweet red pepper, and either carrot or sweet potatoes or parsnips.  Makes a nice winter dish.

The decent Purple Peruvian I did manage to harvest at a decent size are being saved for planting this spring, and none will be eaten--all planted.

I've never tried the Purple Peruvian. I'll have to see if I can find seed potatoes for them here. I've also thought of planting sweet potatoes but, I'm not sure it would be warm enough up here, since from what I've heard, you're supposed to let them sit outside in the warmth for a few weeks after you've harvested them? and that is what turns them sweet?? Or, is that wrong?

//Solani
Sweet potatoes do need to "cure" for a couple of weeks after digging, but I bring them indoors and lay them out in a monolayer.  They say 80-88 deg. F is a good temp. for curing--I know that sounds high, but it works.  Afterwards they can be stored at room temperature, or slightly cooler, maybe even down to 60 deg. F, but I stored mine one year at around 50 or low 50's deg. F., and they all rotted.

 Sweet potatoes really do love warmth.  When curing them, they can be placed on newspaper on floor near wood stove, or somewhere warm, but probably best not in sun, as that may cause them to turn green, or start forming those "veins" just under the skin.  Once they're dug, they can be in the sun for a few minutes, but I don't purposely leave them in sunshine.  Brush soil off of them, but don't wash them before storage, as that can be done immediately prior to cooking.

Also, since they hate cool weather, one way northerners can help them along, is to plant the "slip" then surround it with an opaque gallon jug, with bottom removed.  That way they sit inside their little greenhouse for weeks before they grow up enough to push up the milk jug.  You can even leave the lid on the jug at night, and remove it during day if day is warm enough.

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #176 on: March 03, 2019, 05:05:08 PM »
Well, with the groundhogs, voles, mice, etc., best not to leave them outside then, in spite of the reputation of PP for overwintering.  ::)

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #177 on: March 31, 2019, 10:34:54 AM »
A bit of food for thought about saving seed from biennials such as parsnips and beets.  For the newbies, biennials are those crops that need two years to mature, the first year being the actual crop, and the second, the stalk that flowers, then produces seeds.  My information, for example on beets and parsnips, says that for good quality seed, the grower should save 6-12 of the best examples of that crop, save them over the winter where they will not freeze, not get warm or hot, and not dry out, all of which requires experimentation to determine the best dormancy location.

I have tried to do this (6-12 of the best roots) every year, and am now wondering if I have been lax.  I noticed in 2018 the parsnip crop was smaller in numbers, plus the actual roots were smaller and inferior to previous crops.  I noticed the same thing with beets.  I must have planted and replanted four or five times, and the final product was still not outstanding, and rather moderate in numbers.

The parsnip bed was an afterthought, that received no fertilization, so that is a possible culprit.  This year I have noticed the seeds that were planted in December, are germinating, but in very low numbers.  Maybe it's too early to tell and maybe many more will germinate.  Plus maybe they will be large and sweet.  For now it's a guess.

The 2018 beets, I thought, were planted in a bed with nice soil, containing many amendments including organic composted goat poo.

This year's crop of the beets and the parsnips will tell the truth.  Because each has been assigned to a nicely dug and well fertilized bed, if they do not grow well in size, and numbers, I'm betting that each beet and parsnips are now suffering "inbreeding recession".

Inbreeding recession occurs when there is not enough genetic diversity among those seed stock roots used for seed production.  It can occur when not enough roots are planted for the seed crop.  It can also occur when the bare minimum is planted for seed crops year after year, so that eventually you are left with a sort of genetic bottleneck.

By late summer when root crops should have attained a large and healthy size, it will be known.  Am posting this as a caveat to those who plan to save seeds in the event seed companies are unavailable.  Some of our crops might be teetering on the edge of extinction, so now is the time to seriously delve into seed saving, whether it be the more difficult biennials, or the much easier annuals.

Good luck to all, and if all goes as planned, a beet and parsnip update will be posted this fall.  And as a backup measure, I plan to order a large quantity of parsnip seeds of different varieties, (I grow "Hollow Crown") and place them in the freezer upon receipt.  This is a good "just in case".

The beets I grow are "Zelenolistnaja 42" and have grown and saved seed from them for approximately 10 years, but am not seeing their availability anywhere now.  Am not even thinking yet of the possibility of not ever finding them again!  They are large, sweet, and don't become tough, even when left in the ground until first week of November, which is usually when I harvest beets.


R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #178 on: March 31, 2019, 03:52:40 PM »
You've brought up some really important considerations Ilinda.  In sourcing seed (hopefully from non-GMO suppliers), some thought might ought to be given to gathering seed from the broadest selection possible within the tolerable growing zones. 

One example of a crop that needs to be sourced from diverse suppliers is Maypop passiflora (the cold-hardiest passionflower that actually bears fruit).  You wouldn't want even to go to your local organic supplier and order all of your seeds or rootstock from him/her, but maybe only purchase one sample at that location, and then if necessary source a genetically diverse clone or seed pack within the same species from mail order at a distance, in order to get your vines to produce fruit that actually fills in, rather than remaining hollow.

Did anything about your micro-climate change in the last year or two?
« Last Edit: March 31, 2019, 05:45:30 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #179 on: April 01, 2019, 12:34:07 PM »
Nothing in this micro-climate has changed that we've noticed.  Last winter was the longest we can ever remember, and when it was nearing its end, it suddenly got hot.  We had little spring.  But that's not unusual.  This past winter we just finished was a typical cold, un-fun winter. 

But there is one thing that has changed over more than just two years, and that is nowadays most of the winter precipitation we receive is rain, rather than snow.  Decades ago it never rained in winter.  Then years ago it rarely rained in winter.  Now, if it snows rather than rains, we're almost surprised.

But all that winter rain doesn't really affect our spring or summer crops--to my knowledge.  The only thing we grow in winter is garlic, and although I plant parsnip seeds in December, they are in a raised bed and if the rains were washing them out, there would be little micro-gullies leading from the top of the bed down the sides, to the walking paths in between beds.  The beds appear intact right now, in spite of rains this past winter.  And of course beets still aren't in the ground.

My best guess is "inbreeding recession".  I certainly do plan to buy seeds from diverse locales.  In fact I plan to buy a LOT of parsnip seeds of different varieties, and from different geographies, then store all that seed in fridge or freezer.

 

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