Being In It for the Species The Kolbrin Bible Complete Danjeon Breathing System 
Surviving the Planet X Tribulation

Author Topic: SEEDS...  (Read 33558 times)

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 33582
  • Karma: +26/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #195 on: April 26, 2019, 09:39:17 PM »
I have read that groundhogs make nice steaks, entirely free from diseases that afflict other game, but a friend of mine says they still taste "gamey."  ;)

:)

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7964
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #196 on: April 27, 2019, 05:04:12 AM »
Maybe brining the meat first in a marinade might help to remove the "gaminess?"  The salted broth in the stew pot might accomplish the same thing?


R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7964
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #197 on: May 22, 2019, 09:18:25 AM »
Revisiting how the seeds sown in peat pots and placed in zip-lock bags turned out:

https://planetxtownhall.com/index.php/topic,6424.msg111509.html#msg111509

All successfully germinated and grew into nice little seedlings, but at very differing rates:  The tomatoes were ready to plant out after only a few weeks of being sown on April 15, and were easily able to withstand temps dropping to 40oF.  The peppers, still in their protective bags, have been much slower, and are only just now arriving at a size suitable for planting out in the elements, so nearly 6 weeks of germination and sprouting time for them.

The "Bangles Blend" sweet pepper seedlings from High-Mowing Seeds are significantly ahead of the barely sprouted "Mini Belles:"



A phone chat with Ilinda reassured me that delayed growth on the part of the peppers is normal, and that they would take off and catch up with the tomatoes as soon as the weather warms up sufficiently.

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7964
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #198 on: May 22, 2019, 09:44:22 AM »
An evaluation of our potato harvest from late last summer / early autumn, as well as overwintered potato seed in the root cellar, has convinced me that in the manner of keeping sunchokes perpetually, it may be best to overwinter at least some of the potato seed stock in the ground, especially in raised beds.

Though I had thought I'd removed all or most of the potatoes from the garden which became the cranberry patch last fall, having assumed that there was a bit too much shade in that spot for spuds, I was astounded at how many Purple Peruvian potato plants came up strongly and boldly this spring among the cranberries. 

Of course they had to be plucked up, as I was reluctant to dig around for them even by hand amidst the delicate mountain cranberry blossoms at their pollination peak, so decided to begin anew with a fresh 5-lb seed potato order in a sunnier raised bed.  The abandoned taters will not be wasted, as they will feed the soil while composting.

Since the Purple Peruvians have proven to be fully perennial even in winters that dip below zero in January, I'm thinking of allowing the mother potatoes to colonize the new bed and form lots of healthy mycelium, and waiting to harvest until 2020.

If anyone might like to place an order this late for that American land-race, I found organic potato seed still available from Irish Eyes in Washington state in 1#, 2# and 5# batches:

https://irisheyesgardenseeds.com/

« Last Edit: May 23, 2019, 05:37:04 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3898
  • Karma: +32/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #199 on: May 29, 2019, 08:17:35 PM »
Amazing potato, that Purple Peruvian.  And interestingly we had similar fortune in growing it, as you did.  Further, IIRC, we did also get our original order from Irish Eyes.

In summer of 2018, I had way too many sprouted Purple Peruvians that I still hadn't planted, so planted some on July 17, and then a bit later planted more in another bed (August, IIRC).  The July planting did produce a crop, although smaller than if I would have planted earlier.  But the later planted ones did send up plant tops and were looking really healthy (still no flowering) when it got cold and frosted.

So I dumped a bunch of old hay on top of the bed, mashing down the plants, and covered it all with poultry wire, then layered anoter bunch of old hay, basically "putting them to bed for the winter".  Didn't have a clue about what would happen "next year", which is now, but will say that these potatoes did all germinate and have produced very healthy plants.  Right now am just waiting for flowering and the dying back, to see what kind of harvest we'll get.  After all they were planted in late summer, then cold weather set in, tops covered heavily, and went dormant for winter.

Update to follow, as I believe this Purple Peruvian is really a winner of a potato.


R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7964
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #200 on: June 13, 2019, 10:32:52 AM »
Quickly revisiting the northern tomato seed project:

Here's the order of size of the plants, as of today, June 13:

Cosmonaut Volkov, the Russian variety, is the tallest and bushiest.

Stupice, the Polish variety, is a very close second.

Bloody Butcher, a North American strain, is in third place for growth.

Glacier from Sweden is last, still very small, but may thrive in the autumn.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2019, 10:52:29 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3898
  • Karma: +32/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #201 on: June 13, 2019, 06:58:39 PM »
Quickly revisiting the northern tomato seed project:

Here's the order of size of the plants, as of today, June 13:

Cosmonaut Volkov, the Russian variety, is the tallest and bushiest.

Stupice, the Polish variety, is a very close second.

Bloody Butcher, a North American strain, is in third place for growth.

Glacier from Sweden is last, still very small, but may thrive in the autumn.
This is good.  And at season's end, hope you will post a final comparison.  Yours may be the first tomato growing comparison posted here on PXTH.

 From this end, I hope to post an update on the overall results of the three separate beds of Purple Peruvian fingerling potatoes.
1)  Bed #1 was planted late summer 2018, but cold weather came before plants flowered, so I piled thick hay on top of entire bed, literally smothering the plants, approximately in October, but they began growing again in early spring 2019, and are now flowering big time;
2)  Bed #2 was planted April 27, 2019 and is flowering now, but plants are not as tall or robust as in bed #1;
3)  Bed #3 was planted 6-11-19.

Update to follow after all plants have flowered, died back, then dug.

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7964
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #202 on: June 14, 2019, 04:35:12 AM »
That's an exciting project Ilinda.  Will take a wild guess and speculate that Bed #1 will thrive, due to this strain's unusual perennial habit and the head start with mycorrhizal formations underground?

We shall see... :) 

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7964
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #203 on: June 20, 2019, 02:56:54 PM »
Here is a first-generation farmer from Michigan who provided a tour of his late-summer vegetable garden a couple of years ago:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1b_sCwlIQM

What I found helpful about this film:

*It was interesting to see what he was growing from seed up in Michigan, as well as what performed well for him and what didn't

*He made a very important point that we should be planting much more of everything than we think we'll need, because some of it will fail.  Also, I got the impression from the discussion that after years of not getting peppers to perform, planting many more of them may have helped with pollination. 

*If an entire crop fails, might want to consider not including it in the future.

*It was interesting to see what crops were still at their peak of production in late summer, and which ones were already done for the growing season.

*He discusses a no-hoe method of creating paths between crops.

*Comparison of non-toxic methods of pest control

*He makes an important point about saving seeds for the future:  The weather had interfered with saving seeds from one particular crop for seven straight years in a row (they were moldy, I believe he said), so we cannot depend on future seed-saving, and I infer that we need to save more seed than we expect we'll need in years when seed-saving is favorable.  Perhaps a substantial number of plants in each crop will need to be allowed to go to seed, meaning all of that ground is left alone for a time?



« Last Edit: June 20, 2019, 04:08:14 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3898
  • Karma: +32/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #204 on: June 21, 2019, 09:03:27 PM »
Here is a first-generation farmer from Michigan who provided a tour of his late-summer vegetable garden a couple of years ago:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1b_sCwlIQM

What I found helpful about this film:

*It was interesting to see what he was growing from seed up in Michigan, as well as what performed well for him and what didn't

*He made a very important point that we should be planting much more of everything than we think we'll need, because some of it will fail.  Also, I got the impression from the discussion that after years of not getting peppers to perform, planting many more of them may have helped with pollination. 

*If an entire crop fails, might want to consider not including it in the future.

*It was interesting to see what crops were still at their peak of production in late summer, and which ones were already done for the growing season.

*He discusses a no-hoe method of creating paths between crops.

*Comparison of non-toxic methods of pest control

*He makes an important point about saving seeds for the future:  The weather had interfered with saving seeds from one particular crop for seven straight years in a row (they were moldy, I believe he said), so we cannot depend on future seed-saving, and I infer that we need to save more seed than we expect we'll need in years when seed-saving is favorable.  Perhaps a substantial number of plants in each crop will need to be allowed to go to seed, meaning all of that ground is left alone for a time?


Definitely need to watch the video as he sounds like he's on target. 

And seedsaving is going to be crucial.  I almost lost my beet seed and how have a substantial stand of seed beets planted in the same garden as the beets for eating.  As the guy points out seed can be lost and unless you know someone nearby who saves the same thing, you may never be able to grow it again.  Scary proposition! 

Weather is definitely making itself known in gardening/growing circles.  As you suggested re my parsnips, it was the constant rain this past winter that caused my parsnip seeds planted in December to perform so poorly, i.e., to have such low germination rates.  They were soaking all winter long in cold water, sometimes freezing, and other times alternately freezing and not freezing.  Poor seeds didn't know what to do.  Per your suggestion, next parsnip crop won't be planted till late January or early February, after most of the winter rains are finished.

The guy couldn't get a crop for seven years!  That is amazing that he even continued to try.

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7964
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #205 on: June 22, 2019, 06:10:56 AM »
Good for you Ilinda, for expanding your beet crop to hedge your bet.

Am not sure whether he had no crop at all for 7 years, or if maybe the weather was unfavorable for it setting seed that was salvageable?  Either way, I guess that would have meant purchasing seed all over again each time.

So his advice would seem to run somewhat counter to those who advocate squeezing every bit of harvest out of the land each year via succession planting, which would involve ripping a finished crop out and sowing another one immediately.

Seems another way of hedging our bets would be to mix permaculture with seed crops, so that something is always cropping in the garden, even if not everything produces in a given year?

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7964
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #206 on: July 10, 2019, 03:03:12 PM »
For those who live in Southern U.S. planting zones 8 and 9, it's time to get your fall and winter crop seeds in the ground, if you intend to plant cole crops, etc.  :)


A winter vegetable garden in southerly temperate latitudes
of the Northern Hemisphere

ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3898
  • Karma: +32/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #207 on: July 10, 2019, 06:43:49 PM »
For those who live in Southern U.S. planting zones 8 and 9, it's time to get your fall and winter crop seeds in the ground, if you intend to plant cole crops, etc.  :)


A winter vegetable garden in southerly temperate latitudes
of the Northern Hemisphere
Perfect timing.  Been planning to plant a fall turnip patch but it's been so long since we've grown turnips as a late season crop.  Would August 1 or so be a good time?  IIRC, turnips don't take nearly as long as some crops, so even if 60 days that would take them up to October 1, and imagine they will continue going until a frost or two.

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7964
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #208 on: July 11, 2019, 05:17:12 AM »
Having never sown turnips, I can't answer that question, but hope you'll experiment and then report back :)

But after looking at this buttered turnip recipe, I might just be persuaded to plant some!


https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/nancy-fuller/butter-roasted-turnips-3279832

ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3898
  • Karma: +32/-0
Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #209 on: July 11, 2019, 08:08:43 PM »
Looks easy enough:  turnips, garlic, thyme, black pepper and butter.  Also sort of mouthwatering!

 

Surviving the Planet X Tribulation: A Faith-Based Leadership Guide

Radio Free Earth: Community Preparedness and Two Way Radios

BUY NOW

In a post-global disaster world, predators and tyrants will have the best two-way radios, and they'll use them to surveil you at a comfortable distance.

What will you have? Signal flares and red bandannas?

If so, when you least expect it, the predators and tyrants will come to take a spoil and they will torture, rape, and kill without mercy.

This is why Radio Free Earth authors Marshall Masters and Duane W. Brayton have an urgent message for everyone with a serious interest in preparedness. That being, analog RF (radio frequency) is the heartbeat of freedom. Accept no substitutes.

Watch our free videos to learn how to stay safe and free with an affordable strategy for two way communication, both near and far.

Welcome to Radio
Free Earth

Why Radio
Free Earth

Post-Disaster
Communications

Citizens Band Radios
for Survival

BUY NOW