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Author Topic: SEEDS...  (Read 34733 times)

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #225 on: August 22, 2019, 08:49:46 AM »
Well, what I refer to as the "root cellar" is really an unheated garage that's partly underground.  Have had success in the past with crates of vegies like you described, with shallow layering. 

Last fall I placed the harvested purple Peruvians in single layers on wood & wire stacking bins, and kept them in the cool and dark down there, but they still rotted within a couple of months.  That could be due to the fact that other wire stacking bins nearby had apples and onions, and maybe the ripening gasses from those affected the potatoes?
They say apples and potatoes don't store well together due to the ethylene gas that ripening apples emit, which then causes potatoes to ripen (rot).  Have always wondered if there might be a way to sequester the apples from potatoes in the same "cellar". 

Just looked up molecular weights and oddly enough ethylene gas and dry air have about the same weight, eliminating the likelihood that one would sink and the other would rise, in relation to the other.  So sad that you lost all that produce!

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #226 on: August 23, 2019, 03:23:26 PM »
I actually didn't let it go bad past the beginning of soft spots - managed to cook the good portions up all at once, thankfully!

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #227 on: August 23, 2019, 06:34:33 PM »
Today I spent literally hours online searching for info. on public access to the USDA seed accessions.  Followed many links, to no avail.  Am looking for the special beet, Zelenolistnaja 42 which is a variety I've grown for years, but now am concerned about "inbreeding recession".

Will contact our local university extension office to see if they can steer me in the right direction, which I think you had suggested weeks ago!

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #228 on: August 24, 2019, 04:41:01 PM »
I've made special written requests to the USDA in the past and never heard back from them!  Maybe Seed Savers?

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #229 on: August 25, 2019, 11:09:45 AM »
I've made special written requests to the USDA in the past and never heard back from them!  Maybe Seed Savers?
Bingo!  I did manage to find the old SSE seed yearbook for a year in which that beet was listed.  Can't believe the information was right here all this time and in a cleaning frenzy I/we had threatened to throw away a lot of old magazines including SeedSavers Exchange yearbooks!

Interestingly, it appears that SSE came into possession of the Zelenolistnaja 42 beet and offered it, then a "Listed Member" offered it, as I had bought it from the listed member.  The listing description reads:

Zelenolistnaja 42     green leaves have beautiful dark red veins, leaves of mature plants are quite large--up to 8 wide at the base and up to 9" long, beets are dark burgundy, can be harvested at any size,  when allowed to overwinter (and for seed production) these beets can grow as large as giant mangels,  currently offered seeds are second generation from those at Heritage Farm (from Iowa Seed Savers Exchange), originally from the world-famous seed bank at Gatersleben in the former East Germany: IPK), original seeds were given to SSE in the mid-1990's during seed collecting expeditions to the former East Block countries, this beet was said to have come from the USSR.  SSE BEET 114.

So now there's a trail to explore and fingers are crossed that someone, somewhere will still be growing this or have its seeds in cold storage.  Also I note that the leaves can be even longer than the 9" stated in its description.  It's definitely worth maintaining such a versatile and nutritious crop, which incidentally is much more amenable to cooler climates.  It tolerates summer heat, but enjoys moderate and even cool temps.  Thanks for listening everyone and anyone!   LOL

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #230 on: August 25, 2019, 02:20:49 PM »
East Germany - No wonder it's so rare now.  Sounds like a very valuable crop for Northerners during the GSM!

What are mangels?

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #231 on: August 25, 2019, 06:39:09 PM »
Youtube channel Homestead Family, located in northern Idaho, shares its list of 20 crops that can be grown in Autumn:

They make an important point in the film: Our earliest frost or few frosts often represent a false start to winter from a harvest perspective, and if we can just get our seed crops through that hurdle, we might be able to extend the growing season another full month, which then extends the length of time we can feed ourselves and our family on fresh, rather than preserved food.

They also suggest trying something new each year for variety, and especially mention some new fruit-flavored radishes!


Chinese Shawo Fruit Radish



ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #232 on: August 26, 2019, 07:15:14 PM »
East Germany - No wonder it's so rare now.  Sounds like a very valuable crop for Northerners during the GSM!

What are mangels?
They are considered a fodder beet,, are very sweet and also delicious.  I used to grow them  (both yellow and red) and they grew well for years then they seemed to not do so well.  The source of my seed was somewhere in B.C., and their climate was much cooler, I think, than here, and maybe the years they seemed to peter out were too warm here.  They can get truly huge!  Worth a try for some areas, I believe Pennsylvania included.

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #233 on: September 05, 2019, 09:48:55 AM »
Good to know Ilinda - Thank you!

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #234 on: September 05, 2019, 10:07:37 AM »
For those areas that are beginning to cool down in anticipation of Autumn, now is an ideal time to be focusing upon salad greens in the garden, for a number of reasons:

1. Damaging insects such as cabbage moths are winding down their reproduction for the year

2. Cooler highs mean less likelihood of plants bolting, in which they send up a gangly seed stalk in lieu of producing a nice bouquet of leaves

3. Home-grown greens can begin to replace summer's bounty for fresh eating

4. Now that earlier seed-sown garden crops have already been harvested, space becomes available for succession planting.

5. Baby greens take up relatively little space, and can be kept near the house for ease of tending

6. With a cloth draped over them during frosts, they may withstand the cold all the way up to Thanksgiving in the North

It can be both fun and nutritious to mix up a bunch of different cultivars for fall eating.  Here's what took over this 2 x 4 raised planting bed just outside the kitchen door:

Included in this mix under protective mesh are curly endive, bolt-resistant red butterhead lettuce, arugula, escarole, Ruby lettuce, and heat-tolerant Muir lettuce for those Indian summer days.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2019, 05:41:58 PM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #235 on: October 08, 2019, 12:29:53 PM »
The verdict is in on the tomato seed trial:

Of the final two contenders, the Polish Czechoslovakian tomato, Stupice is the clear winner.  The runner-up was the Russian tomato, Volkov.

The superiority of Stupice became clear by the beginning of October, when Volkov virtually ceased producing, and what was produced ceased ripening on the vine due to some nights with temps here dropping down to the low 40s.

That did not deter Stupice one bit: The vines have continued both to produce and ripen at the same rate as in summer.  In addition, the golf-ball-sized tomatoes have been juicier than Volkov, and have managed to achieve a deep red, tender stage of ripening that Volkov couldn't reach without forming black spots after sitting in the basket for several days til needed.

Others may have different experiences with these tomatoes, but I'll definitely hope to be growing these again.  Will report back on the date when they stop producing for the year.

One other test won't be complete until a year or two from now: whether they can be grown in the same soil in subsequent years without forming a disease cycle.  If they can achieve that with help from my end on soil stewardship, then they will truly be one for the Ark  :)

« Last Edit: October 08, 2019, 01:00:52 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #236 on: October 09, 2019, 10:40:27 AM »
Stupice comes across like an amazing find.  Hubby grew it years ago but was not interested (at that time) in longevity or cold tolerance, but I'll show him your comments and when he gets back to gardening, am betting he will seek out this variety.

Isn't it amazing how much you learn when you closely examine and compare two varieties (of anything)?

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #237 on: October 09, 2019, 10:41:57 AM »
It's true, and I can't wait to complete additional trials next summer!

 

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