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Author Topic: What i learned this year...  (Read 2568 times)

Socrates

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What i learned this year...
« on: December 22, 2016, 12:01:00 AM »
I have traveled around the Sun 52 times (reckoning from about 10 days from now) and you'd think i'd've acquired enough basic knowledge to get me by in all that time. Strangely enough, though, i have learned many basics this past year. Yeah, it's been a tough year, but at the same time it's been very educational, especially in relation to survival skills.

One thing i learned concerns the matter of calories; if you view my posts this past year, you will already know how i have moved from being mineral-focused to calorie-focused. Fact is, i used to have many off days during which i would be in particularly foul moods that were as hard on myself as they were on intimates. Then, when i started looking into losing weight so i could haul more weight [i.e. of essential goods on my back], i learned the importance of calories. The fact is that i used to ignore the matter of calories altogether and this often resulted in me just not getting enough. And what that sometimes leads to is many days of caloric deficiency on end. Now, what does that cause?
Your body has glycogen in the blood and in the cells of your muscles. It is generally accepted that your body has a glycogen reserve of 72 hours. After that reserve is consumed your body needs to start burning fats, or in other words, to get into ketosis; so what you're basically talking about is that the body starts burning proteins and fats instead of carbohydrates, for it is gonna get that glycogen from somewhere.
Now, if you are denying your body enough calories from carbohydrates for long enough, it ends up resorting to proteins or fats, but the fact is that your body will not turn to burning fats as long as you are consuming sugars. And if you're not consuming enough sugars to keep your glycogen levels up but you are consuming enough sugars to stop your body from digging into fat reserves, you are energetically/glycogenically screwed, so to speak. It also does not bode well for your muscles (which may get eaten up in the process).

Anyway, it is important to make sure you get enough energy in the body that it can actually use, be that proteins, fats or carbs; otherwise your glycogen levels drop and you are starving for energy. Particularly if your brain starts starving for energy, you get into bad moods. Quite unnecessarily, i might add. I mean, it's not like things are necessarily going so poorly for you, it's just a matter of energy.
So, through looking into losing weight and building muscle, after decades of looking into health and good diet practices i finally picked up on these basic concepts concerning energy levels in the body, particularly in the brain.
That was the biggest thing i learned this past year.

I have also learned about alcohol as source of energy. Now i know this is a culturally/politically incorrect topic, but in the end alcohol is just a source of calories, albeit one that has certain unique properties (and, may i say, potential benefits?).
So, for one, i learned:
- carbs = 4 calories
- proteins = 4 calories
- fats = 9 calories
- alcohol = 7 calories
And when you are emotionally haggered and needing release, alcohol will accomplish what no sugar (high) will [perhaps this particularly applies to men, whose brains work quite differently than tose of women]. Now, considering that just about all long-lived cultures in the world throughout time have fermented drinks and enjoyed alcoholic relief, who are we to judge the benefits that come from alcoholic stupor?
Having said all that, it is clear, i believe, that (so-called) alcoholism is a result of mineral deficiencies and trauma; therefore, to do as the Mohammedans have done and condemn the consumption of alcohol as a matter of course is excessive and a matter of throwing out the baby with the bath water; yes, especially distilled alcoholic beverages can easily lead to abuse, but at the same time there are benefits that the consumption of alcoholic beverages offers that are not to be found elsewhere, if only for the reason that they supply a source of calories [remember: 7 per gram] the body and mind may be in desperate need of.
So, "distilled"; what does that mean? Distilling is a chemical process whereby certain elements or compounds are distilled from a source, like alcohol from wort or elefants eating berries that digest in their gut.
Now all those natural processes are quite different from 'technological' ones that extract ethonol from 'natural brews'. Then you're talking about "liquor". [In the Qur'an this distinction is important, as [research shows] natural alcohols from 'beers' and 'wines' [so much to say on this matter because of definitions] have quite a different effect on body and mind than processed / refined ones do.

I also learned about the extent to which governmental institutions will go infringing on common decency, morality and one's promised rights; now, this came as no surprise to me, though i admit i was taken aback a bit by the actual fact and application of it all. My words have been submitted verbatum to third parties in the express intention to undermine personal relationships i have, all with the mere incentive of civil servants and their search for justification of their agendas, particularly concerning the wellbeing of my son, i.e. child services ordered the DA to monitor my online activities and employ this actively to seek to destroy my relationship with my son's mother. In other words, i have been granted a clearer picture of the (lawless and immoral) lengths to which civil servants (and the forces they use as willing participants) are willing to go to meddle in the affairs of individuals (who, like myself, have basically done nothing wrong and certainly nothing they can prove is illegal or otherwise malicious).
In other words, i have learned to be even more careful about governmental meddling and i will be doing more of my work at the local library under handles that have no connection to those associated with my slave name or known IP address.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2020, 03:46:52 AM by Socrates »
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Jimfarmer

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Re: What i learned this year...
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2016, 09:43:58 AM »
Quote
- carbs = 4 calories
- proteins = 4 calories
- fats = 9 calories
- alcohol = 7 calories

What are the units on the left sides?

Socrates

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Re: What i learned this year...
« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2016, 03:19:18 PM »
Grams; it's per gram
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Socrates

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Calories / ATP / macronutrients
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2016, 04:08:29 AM »
On a survival note, proteins and fats tend to be more efficiently 'packaged' than carbohydrates. So on the one hand one has an equal amount of calories per gram with carabohydrates and proteins, but on the other hand carbs tend to be packaged along with all kinds of (heavy) stuff like water. I mean, if you have 100 grams of bread, even 40% of that weight is actually water. (Yes, even with bread...) But if you have 100 grams of cheese, for example [i.e. of fats], that's almost all proteins and fats and little to no water weight.
Honey is a good example of a carbohydrate food that is concentrated, which is why a pound of honey can offer 3000 calories. 500 grams of butter might net you [500 x 9 =] 4500 calories, but there's really no way to just eat that (though it works well added to some food or other.

There are combinations and balances to be struck, obviously. Per weight, as a survival option, some tins of sardines and honey might do wonders. pemmican is a survival food that helped how the West was won, giving a palatable combo of fats and proteins; and like honey, it'll just about keep forever.
Affordable, compact and easy. If you can arrange 3000 calories a day in a survival situation, that's a real edge on the competition right there!
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Yowbarb

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Re: Calories / ATP / macronutrients
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2020, 03:27:17 PM »
Per weight, as a survival option, some tins of sardines and honey might do wonders. pemmican is a survival food that helped how the West was won, giving a palatable combo of fats and proteins; and like honey, it'll just about keep forever.
Affordable, compact and easy. If you can arrange 3000 calories a day in a survival situation, that's a real edge on the competition right there!


Socrates, I totally agree, these foods you had posted, particularly, would help get the needed proteins and calories. Sardines, honey, pemmican.

This page discusses how long canned sardines will keep. Basically up to five years if stored in a cool, dry place.

https://oureverydaylife.com/sardines-ever-bad-32614.html

- Barb T.

Socrates

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Re: eating butter...
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2020, 10:11:34 AM »
Honey is a good example of a carbohydrate food that is concentrated, which is why a pound of honey can offer 3000 calories. 500 grams of butter might net you [500 x 9 =] 4500 calories, but there's really no way to just eat that (though it works well added to some food or other.
About 4 months i spent daily listening for hours to Bulletproof Radio and i learned quite a lot. One of the things i learned is that Dave Asprey will actually eat butter to keep his energy up. He's talking about rather unique situations in which there's really no quality food to have except for the butter he's carrying with him. I mean, he's all about quality foods and avoiding low-quality foods so he'll actually munch down on a bar of butter rather than going to carbs, fats or proteins from subquality sources.

Also, i've heard of althletes gulping down olive oil. As unnatural as that might sound, one should realize that what albatrose mothers feed their chicks is basically a kind of 'diesel'... I.E. it's all relative [but still 'natural'].
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Yowbarb

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Re: What i learned this year...
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2020, 02:52:22 PM »
Socrates,
I agree, a store of butter and olive oil is a really good idea.
I have learned from experience, these fats, early in the day provide a lot of energy...

ilinda

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Re: What i learned this year...
« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2020, 05:32:25 PM »
Agree that high-quality fats are better than many foods, maybe most. 

When I was still in a high-chair I remember mom feeding me peanut butter sandwiches that had butter spread on the bread before the peanut butter.  My best guess as to why --I never got to nurse because mom had pneumonia when I was born and maybe she fed me extra animal fat for the first few years to try to make up for the lack of high-quality milk?  (I didn't "know" the names of the ingredients then, but recognized them later.)

Socrates

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Re: fats
« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2020, 04:13:08 AM »
There have been cultural developments that have warped the minds of generations...
For one, we have become adverse to fats as a food / calorie source, which is historically and biologically kinda weird. It is a relatively recent development but for beings who only live about 80 or 90 years, ironically it is prevalent in 'modern' culture / society.

Naturally / biologically speaking, burning fats for biological processes / fuel is efficient and, one might say, healthy. Hell, especially in our day-and-age of obese, diabetic and otherwise overweight compatriots, burning fat is a life or death issue.
From a prepper / survivalist viewpoint, every gram of bodyweight besides muscle means i can carry less essential goods...


We are, however, social animals and if most of us succumb to some habit or other, we have a general feeling to adjust our habits, expectations and demands 'appropriately'... Ironically, this is totally in line with the research of Peter Kropotkin, a contemporary of Darwin, who advocated the demands of biological social life.
[Really, if you've no knowledge of Kropotkin and his masterpiece Mutual Aid, you do not know what it means to be human...]


...
Burning fats and 'being human', are they connected?
Well, then there's Born to Run, Christopher McDougall's book on how to survive as an intermediate-speed life form, running down deer occanionally but otherwise living off of a vegan diet...
[(free) amino acids need not be acquired daily as they are absorbed in the body's 'protein pool'.]
« Last Edit: January 20, 2020, 05:49:57 PM by Socrates »
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ilinda

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Re: What i learned this year...
« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2020, 05:45:44 PM »
From the link:
Peter "Kropotkin was a proponent of a decentralised communist society free from central government and based on voluntary associations of self-governing communities and worker-run enterprises."

This is reminiscent of Michael Tellinger's Ubuntu philosophy, both of which have more merit and seem more appealing than anything offered by "civilized" countries today.  Also see https://michaeltellinger.com/ubuntu/

Socrates

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Re: Mutual Aid
« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2020, 05:56:22 PM »
Unfortunately, Kropotkin's findings only apply to 25% of the population, according to the Milgram Experiment; the 75% are obsessed with power-based authority, paranoia and jealousy. These are incapable of the kind of psychologically healthy relationships Kropotkin imagined. People should be able to choose though and not everyone should be forced to deal with tyranical government just because a majority of people prefer it. Anyway, that's my two cents' worth.
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R.R. Book

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Re: What i learned this year...
« Reply #11 on: January 21, 2020, 07:24:37 AM »
Sounds good on paper, but Libertarians would be skittish about the number of times the word "distribution" is used in the text - meaning that (1) someone at the top of the pyramid is in charge of  collecting the contributions and (2) everyone is on the dole.  This might be workable in a location where people have a high degree of personal ethics and deep roots in the community, such that everyone is everyone else's cousin.

Perhaps a more ancient foundation for community is the "corners of the field" concept in Leviticus 23, meaning that landholders are required by moral law to plow their fields in a circular manner, leaving all 4 corners for the poor to glean and either eat or sell, on the grounds that a higher power than the farmer provided the good weather to bring the crop to maturity.  That includes any crop seed that is produced in the 4 corners. Of course, this system assumes that the poor are willing and able to do that much work, so a two-way commitment is required.

One wonders if this message could be at the core of crop circles, re-awakening the primal geometric glyph, the circle, which instructs us on how to perform social justice without the imposition of a pyramid scheme.


Jimfarmer

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Re: What i learned this year...
« Reply #12 on: January 21, 2020, 12:18:59 PM »
From the link:
Peter "Kropotkin was a proponent of a decentralised communist society free from central government and based on voluntary associations of self-governing communities and worker-run enterprises."

This is reminiscent of Michael Tellinger's Ubuntu philosophy, both of which have more merit and seem more appealing than anything offered by "civilized" countries today.  Also see https://michaeltellinger.com/ubuntu/

Quote
Unfortunately, Kropotkin's findings only apply to 25% of the population, according to the Milgram Experiment; the 75% are obsessed with power-based authority, paranoia and jealousy. These are incapable of the kind of psychologically healthy relationships Kropotkin imagined.

Well , that is what the Emancipation of Earth and Humanity,  and Ascension,  are all about.
Enlightened Socialism should become possible on New Earth.  It works in many extraterrestrial civilizations, according to what I have read.

Socrates

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independent farming
« Reply #13 on: January 23, 2020, 06:47:09 AM »
Libertarians would be skittish about the number of times the word "distribution" is used in the text - meaning that (1) someone at the top of the pyramid is in charge of  collecting the contributions
Great talk here by a guy [and his gal] who went out and started gardening/farming with little-to-no cash or experience.
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R.R. Book

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Re: What i learned this year...
« Reply #14 on: January 23, 2020, 11:11:33 AM »
I really like Fortier.  What's been working in this area is that older farmers are retiring in place on the farm, while allowing unrelated young people to move in as renters, perhaps on a separate floor of the farmhouse or into an extra building on the land.  The young people take over the physical labor of the farm, while the retiring farmer gives advice and helps the younger generation learn the farming calendar.  He (or she) may putter around as he sees fit and help whenever he feels up to the task.

The young people, in turn, bring fresh ideas to the farm, such as biodynamics, and tend to be perhaps even better stewards of the soil than the retiree, as soil stewardship was not emphasized so much as external inputs in the previous couple of generations, except perhaps in a few locations in which the farmer, or culture, tuned out the ag-chem movement.  Several CSA's in this area were born that way.
« Last Edit: January 23, 2020, 02:39:14 PM by R.R. Book »

 

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