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Author Topic: Northern Permaculture  (Read 26462 times)

ilinda

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #195 on: April 10, 2019, 06:37:46 PM »
Dragging old plastic tarps out of the garden, swearing never to use plastic again!  (The plastic was a makeshift greenhouse for the "Olive House" to protect the olive trees in winter.) 

Removing every single thing from the garden that is not essential for growing crops:  plastic tarps; flower pots, small, medium and large; two black mixing tubs, one 6' aluminum ladder, surplus concrete blocks formerly part of the makeshift "Olive House"; and when garlic is harvested in June, removing the "raccoon proofing" which consists of a long roll of welded wire fencing, unrolled and lying on top of the garlic bed, with the garlics sticking through the holes,; and removing the 10' long cedar sticks used to anchor down the hideous-looking welded wire garlic cover.

Hard to imagine so much "stuff" in one little garden!

The good part is that garlic, shallots, and some parsnips are growing, and today I planted beet seeds, and replanted parsnips to fill in spaces.

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #196 on: April 11, 2019, 04:16:21 AM »
Am seeing alliums up here also!

It sounds as if you could use an extra shed or barn?  I've got some clutter in the henyard that needs to come out, as well, like a gate separating the duckyard from the hens which came off its hinges, a partial bale of welded wire, a partial bale of chicken wire, a bird house that fell from its post, etc.  I spent half of last Saturday just focusing on repairs in the henyard, but more needs to be done.

If you decide against plastic for overwintering the olives, will you build another kind of greenhouse?  I lost a fruitful fig once here, and would like to try again, as there are better cultivars now for the North.  Still not sure about where to put a greenhouse though...

ilinda

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #197 on: April 11, 2019, 05:38:39 PM »
Had to laugh at my list of clutter and your list of clutter and thought that would make a fun topic:  Homestead Clutter.

We could post pics of our awful-looking areas, but it's just a pipe dream, as I'm sure Marshall wouldn't appreciate us taking us space to show and tell pics of clutter!  LOL

I did order a little greenhouse and it has been delivered and is sitting unassembled in a back room.  It will be erected around the current olive trees with a few extra feet in which we can plant greens or whatever.  Current "olive house" is about 4' X 12' and new one is 6' X 16'.  Only other thing needed will be some concrete piers or footing or something very substantial to anchor it, as my original plan to set it on red cedar posts/boards was changed a month or so ago when we experienced incredible winds for several days, which partially destroyed the little makeshift olive house.

Speaking of figs, we have four--two that remain in the ground and two that were temporarily moved indoors as they are still in pots.  The two that in the ground survived the winter before last including -20 deg. F.  They do lose all their leaves and look awful, but can come back.  But if it's -20 deg. F for days or weeks on end, they might die.  Some people in MO will plant them against a stone or brick wall which is a great heat sink in winter, plus they mulch.  Still waiting to see if the two outdoor figs resurrect again this year, as it's a bit early.

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #198 on: April 11, 2019, 05:42:18 PM »
Am thinking that I may have actually pronounced the fig tree dead too soon then?  Too late now, as I already dug it up some years ago!  ::)

Looking forward to seeing your greenhouse go up, as well as sharing our clutter!  LOL!  :D :D

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture: Cold-Hardy Strawberries
« Reply #199 on: April 12, 2019, 09:12:07 AM »
As our climate cools where we live, am noticing that I can no longer overwinter permaculture crops in raised beds with legs or in containers on the deck, so now they all must either go directly into the ground or in a raised bed without legs that makes full contact with the ground.  The old containers will still be useful for annuals.

That would suggest that we've lost a full or half planting zone here already (7 to 6).  We were technically 6b before, but could grow several zone 7 items in the past. 

Though previously my focus for strawberries was on disease resistance due to our wet climate, am suggesting some cold-hardy varieties for gardeners in more Northerly latitudes:

Short Season ("June Bearing" but might be mid or late season):

Annapolis (early season)
Cabot (early season
Mesabi (mid season)
Archer (mid season)
Cavendish (mid season)
Kent (mid season)
Stellarossa (late season)

Of these, Mesabi from the University of Minnesota appears to be by far the most disease-resistant, but it doesn't thrive in a rainy climate.

Everbearing / Day-Length Neutral:

Ozark Beauty
Ogallala
Arapahoe
Sequoia
Hecker

https://strawberryplants.org/strawberry-varieties/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_strawberry_cultivars

http://www.lakeview-farms.com/strawberryvarietiescombined.htm#Mesabi


The "Annapolis" strawberry cultivar is
surprisingly listed as cold-hardy, even
though named after a more southerly city.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2019, 02:20:16 PM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #200 on: May 14, 2019, 02:38:27 PM »
Those who listen to Apple or ITunes podcasts might enjoy Urban Forestry Radio.  They have 41 permaculture podcasts sponsored by the Community Orchard Network, an organization that encourages the planting of food in public spaces.

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/urban-forestry-radio/id1078657833

Today I listened to the description in Episode 7 of the Romance Series line of dwarf tart cherry trees, as told by the Canadian breeder himself.  Here is a brief synopsis, with additional info gleaned from other sources:

Romeo: Produces darker cherries later in the season that average 4g in weight with a Brix of 18-22.  Considered to have the best flavor, and begins bearing a year earlier than the others.  Thicker-skinned.  Ties with Cupid for highest pH.  A good processing cherry, and good for fruit leather.  Ties with Cupid for latest season production.  Low suckering - More of a tree than a bush.

Crimson Passion: The smallest height of the series on extreme dwarfing rootstock.  Also produces large darker cherries weighing 6g.  The firmest of the series, and good for canning.  The only member of the series not to produce nodes on the roots which can be developed into cherry shrubs, so it is distinctly a tree-form rather than a bush.  The Canadians considered this to be a drawback in a cold climate, as once the top of the tree is killed, there is no salvaging the plant.  It also has the highest sugar content with a Brix of 22, and tied with the earlier version of the series, Carmine Jewel, for most intense color.  Not fully diseast-resistant in wet climates.  Also least reliable of the series, sometimes skipping production in some years, and may cease blooming after several years.

Valentine: The only one in the series to produce a bright red cherry, it has a Brix of 18.  Considered the best for dehydrating, which should be done in a 225o oven for several hours instead of in a dehydrator due to the juices.  Soft skin.  Lowest pH.  Smallest fruit in most years, though it can exceed the others occasionally in size.  Has an elongated pit that must be removed by hand.  Not yet released in the States.

Cupid: Produces the largest fruit of the series at 6.5g, which is also a dark red color.  Firm skin.  Ties with Crimson Passion for the highest sugar:acid ratio, and has a Brix of 16-20.  Ties with Romeo for latest season production and highest pH.  A good processing cherry.  Not yet released in the States.

Juliet: Fruit weighs 5g with a Brix of 18-20.  High fruit-to-pit ratio (more fruit than pit), and pits are especially easy to remove. Low suckering - more of a true tree form.

All trees in the series are self-pollinating and appropriate for zones 2-8 due to chilling / dormancy-hour requirements.

Compare with the early parent of this series from 1990's breeding work by the same breeders, Carmine Jewel:

Carmine Jewel has smallest fruit at 4g, with a 13-17 Brix and thin skins.  Produces a lot of juice and makes a good wine cherry, as well as being good for fruit leather.  Highest consistent yield.  It ripens earlier than the Romance Series and has no diseases that I'm aware of.



Trial summary:
http://www.agriculture.gov.sk.ca/apps/adf/ADFAdminReport/20090405.pdf

More:
http://prairietechpropagation.com/app/uploads/Dwarf-Sour-Cherry-Table-2019.pdf


Breeders of the Romance Series cherries from the University of Saskatchewan
https://fruitgrowersnews.com/news/saskatchewan-fruit-breeders-receive-prestigious-horticulture-award/

 

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