Win-Win Survival Communities The Kolbrin Bible Complete Danjeon Breathing System Radio Free Earth

Author Topic: Northern Permaculture  (Read 46131 times)

ilinda

  • Guest
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #270 on: November 30, 2019, 01:27:02 PM »
That was a real shocker to see the temperature differences shown in the video!

R.R. Book

  • Members
  • Prolific Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9293
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #271 on: January 24, 2020, 05:38:41 AM »
We've discussed on the "Eating with the Seasons" thread about how healthy artichokes are as a food choice, and how to prepare them.  While they're not often considered a Northern permaculture crop, they can indeed be treated as non-annuals, with a little care:

1. Site the patch in a part of the garden which will permit the plants to be a few feet apart, as they have a wide leaf-spread.  PFAF says soil pH doesn't matter to this species, but they need sunlight.


2. Choose the "Imperial Star" variety, which bears chokes in the first season.  Or opt for sweet anthocyanin-rich Violetta, but expect it to die back several times a year after each fruiting, and then regrow.  Imperial Star isn't triggered to die back just because it produces chokes.  In Northern Europe, hardier choices include Scandinavian cultivars ‘Herrgård’ and ‘Serridslevgaard’

3. Expect to harvest 2 large chokes and half a dozen small ones from each plant before frost, beginning in the first year for Imperial Star, or the 2nd year for other varieties.

4. The plant should be cut back to several inches high before frost, and the roots dug up and brought indoors to the root cellar, greenhouse, etc.  and placed in soil.  The first link below suggests planting them in the ground in burlap bag root balls, like trees, and then pulling out the bags to root cellar before each winter, but natural burlap does rot in the ground.  The second link below says roots are fully winter hardy when not saturated with moisture, and can be cloched or grown in a cold frame or greenhouse without any heat in Scandinavia.  Any roots left in the ground over winter in the North here in North America may die due to winter moisture, or they might do well in situ if covered with mounded soil, leaves, etc.

5. Since artichokes have a truly perennial habit in warm climates (and when babied in the North as described), the roots will need to be divided every several years, which means you'll get free extra plants  :)



From PFAF:

Quote
The globe artichoke has become important as a medicinal herb in recent years following the discovery of cynarin. This bitter-tasting compound, which is found in the leaves, improves liver and gall bladder function, stimulates the secretion of digestive juices, especially bile, and lowers blood cholesterol levels[238, 254]. The leaves are anticholesterolemic, antirheumatic, cholagogue, digestive, diuretic, hypoglycaemic and lithontripic[7, 21, 165]. They are used internally in the treatment of chronic liver and gall bladder diseases, jaundice, hepatitis, arteriosclerosis and the early stages of late-onset diabetes[238, 254]. The leaves are best harvested just before the plant flowers, and can be used fresh or dried[238]. The German Commission E Monographs, a therapeutic guide to herbal medicine, approve Cynara scolymus (Cynara cardunculus subsp. flavescens)for liver and gallbladder complaints, loss of appetite (see [302] for critics of commission E).
« Last Edit: January 24, 2020, 06:47:52 AM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

  • Members
  • Prolific Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9293
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #272 on: January 31, 2020, 02:15:10 PM »
Cummins Nursery in New York is one of the foremost breeders of stone-fruit trees in the U.S.  Here's their current list of available trees for shipping, and which size rootstock they're growing on.  Their inventory is usually quickly depleted each year:


All fruit trees from this company will likely need some cold (chilling hours) during the winter months, and may not be suitable in warm zones.


ilinda

  • Guest
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #273 on: January 31, 2020, 06:43:46 PM »
Thanks for that link.  Am always on the lookout for new sources of fruit trees.  If you know of a source of jujube trees, or even jujube seeds, that would be cool.  I had ordered some jujube seeds a couple of years ago through a seed swap type of organization and the person offering them never sent them, nor would she ever respond to my letters or emails about where my seeds are.

Have heard it's a good one to grow.  More variety on the homestead.

R.R. Book

  • Members
  • Prolific Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9293
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #274 on: February 01, 2020, 06:29:58 AM »
That's an especially good choice since the fruit is anti-viral and can be dehydrated for long-term storage!

Here are some sources that will ship:

http://ediblelandscaping.com/products/trees/Jujubes/ in Virginia

https://www.groworganic.com/collections/jujube-trees in California

https://www.willisorchards.com/category/jujube-trees in Georgia

https://rollingrivernursery.com/products/50/fruit-trees/jujubes-ziziphus-jujuba in California

https://baylaurelnursery.com/jujubes.html in California

https://www.burntridgenursery.com/Jujube-Trees/products/21/ in Washington State

https://onegreenworld.com/product-category/fruiting-shrubs/jujube/ in Oregon

https://www.tytyga.com/Li-Jujube-p/frujuj-li.htm in Georgia (their stated zones are questionable)

https://justfruitsandexotics.com/?s=jujube in Florida

https://raintreenursery.com/fruit-trees/unusual-edibles-jujube in Washington

https://www.treesofantiquity.com/collections/jujube-trees in California

https://www.etsy.com/market/jujube_tree

http://www.nuttrees.net/jujube.html a.k.a. England's Nursery in Kentucky

https://www.burpee.com/fruit/specialty-fruits/jujube-shanxi-li-prod100086.html Headquartered in Pennsylvania

https://www.isons.com/shop/specialty-fruits/jujube/lang-jujube-tree-2/ in Georgia

https://bobwellsnursery.com/?s=jujube&post_type=product in Texas

https://www.lecooke.com/fruit-trees/jujube-trees.html in California

I've had good experiences with nearly all of those nurseries in the past.  Etsy might best be used as a seed source.

Jujube fruits resemble dates when dead ripe.  All cultivars are self-fruitful, meaning you only need one for good pollination and fruit-set, though some nurseries recommend planting two for a better crop.  In the North, they fruit best in planting zone 6 except for one that withstands zone 5, but all should do well in most Southern climates, especially arid ones.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2020, 12:58:56 PM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

  • Members
  • Prolific Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9293
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #275 on: February 01, 2020, 06:37:28 AM »
Comparison of Jujube cultivars.  Note that some of these have been bred in the U.S. for generations now, and are not likely recent imports from China:

https://garden.org/plants/group/jujubes/

Quote
'Li' is the one to plant if you have room for only one tree. Fruits are abundant, round, 1-1/2 to 2 inches in diameter, and sweet. It matures early, a great benefit in short-growing-season areas.

'Lang', compared with 'Li', is taller, and the fruit is a bit more elongated or pear-shaped, about 3/4 inch in diameter and 2 inches long, and has thicker skin. The fruit is a bit less sweet than that of 'Li' and best eaten dried. Branches are nearly thornless.

Other Varieties
'Sherwood' fruits are smaller than 'Li' and ripen later. They keep well in the refrigerator up to 6 weeks. Discovered in the southern Louisiana woods, the tree has an attractive, narrow, weeping shape.

'Silverhill' (also called 'Tiger Tooth') produces elongated fruits that are excellent for drying.

'So' produces high-quality, round fruit on a zigzag-shaped tree.

'Shui Men' (or 'Sui Men') is a highly regarded midseason variety. Its fruits taste good fresh or dried.

'GA 866' is noted for its remarkably high sugar content.

I believe that another name for "So" is "Contorted."

Other varieties not mentioned:

Norris , Shanxi LiBlack Sea , Chico a.k.a. GI7-62 , Winter Delight a.k.a. Mango Dong Zho , Honey Jar (zone 5?) , Sihong a.k.a Shi Hong , Massandra

Remember that larger cultivars can be trained to any height desired for smaller spaces, with regular pruning.

More disambiguation and comments about fertility:

https://growingfruit.org/t/identifying-li-shanxi-li-and-yu-jujubes/8300

https://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_h/H330/
« Last Edit: February 01, 2020, 12:53:24 PM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

  • Members
  • Prolific Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9293
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #276 on: February 01, 2020, 07:51:55 AM »
Note from PFAF:

Quote
Jujube is both a delicious fruit and an effective herbal remedy. It aids weight gain, improves muscular strength and increases stamina[254]. In Chinese medicine it is prescribed as a tonic to strengthen liver function[254]. Japanese research has shown that jujube increases immune-system resistance. In one clinical trial in China 12 patients with liver complaints were given jujube, peanuts and brown sugar nightly. In four weeks their liver function had improved[254]. Antidote, diuretic, emollient, expectorant[11, 61, 174, 178, 194]. The dried fruits contain saponins, triterpenoids and alkaloids[279]. They are anodyne, anticancer, pectoral, refrigerant, sedative, stomachic, styptic and tonic[4, 176, 218]. They are considered to purify the blood and aid digestion[240]. They are used internally in the treatment of a range of conditions including chronic fatigue, loss of appetite, diarrhoea, pharyngitis, bronchitis, anaemia, irritability and hysteria[176, 238, 279]. The seed contains a number of medically active compounds including saponins, triterpenes, flavonoids and alkaloids[279]. It is hypnotic, narcotic, sedative, stomachic and tonic[147, 176, 218]. It is used internally in the treatment of palpitations, insomnia, nervous exhaustion, night sweats and excessive perspiration[176, 238]. The root is used in the treatment of dyspepsia[218]. A decoction of the root has been used in the treatment of fevers[4, 240]. The root is made into a powder and applied to old wounds and ulcers[240]. The leaves are astringent and febrifuge[4, 218]. They are said to promote the growth of hair[218]. They are used to form a plaster in the treatment of strangury[240]. The plant is a folk remedy for anaemia, hypertonia, nephritis and nervous diseases[218]. The plant is widely used in China as a treatment for burns[218].

ilinda

  • Guest
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #277 on: February 01, 2020, 06:10:50 PM »
Wow!  Some wonderfully helpful jujube information.  Worth printing onto hard copy.

R.R. Book

  • Members
  • Prolific Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9293
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #278 on: February 22, 2020, 02:40:39 PM »
I've been studying the variety of barberry / berberis shrubs available lately, particularly for their heart-healthy and mitochondria-restoring PQQ content, which makes them somewhat unique in the plant world.  They should not be confused with bayberry.

The plants are naturalized in North America, and typically grow in zones 4-8.  They can harbor wheat rust, so we need to search for varieties certified against that disease.  The Japanese variety is also invasive. 

They typically have vivid-colored foliage in autumn, and either red or purple tart berries, which are the source of the phytochemical Berberine, where the PQQ is found. 

In the past, they have been planted primarily for their value as a natural hedge, due to sharp barbs, and to feed the birds in winter (deer avoid it).  More recently, dwarfing cultivars have been developed.  Need to check to see which ones also have berries, as some are fruitless.

The main mail-order nurseries that I've found these at have been:

Hirt's Gardens in Ohio

Greenwood Nursery in Tennessee

Kigi Nursery in Washington State

Brighter Blooms in South Carolina

One Green World in Oregon

New Life Nursery in South Carolina

Garden Crossings in Michigan

High Country Gardens in Utah

It may also be possible to obtain non-invasive and non-rust-harboring varieties of this genera free of charge from your local state forestry department, as it is widespread in forests. 

Numerous studies on the benefits of Berberine exist at the NIH / NCBI website. 

Also:

https://draxe.com/nutrition/barberry

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2018/04/15/pqq-berberine-mitochondrial-enhancers.aspx


R.R. Book

  • Members
  • Prolific Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9293
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #279 on: February 22, 2020, 03:13:51 PM »
I had been hoping that crowns of the U.K. asparagus cultivar "Conover's Colossal" would eventually be offered in North America, and it finally has arrived here, courtesy of Oikos Tree Crops, one of my favorite subsistence rootstock sources for its unusual variety which is constantly being improved through a rigorous breeding program.

"Conover's" stands out from other asparagus cultivars due to its much thicker spears on plants which behave mostly as all-male, like other modern cultivars, except for occasional seed-setting.  Anyone preferring a variety with more seed-setting female plants for breeding work may appreciate the old heirloom Mary Washington, which is readily available in North America.

As a hedge against disease, I also keep Jersey Knight and Purple Passion in the garden.

The photo posted on Oikos' website seems not to be a correct match for the cultivar, which looks more like the photo, below, taken from the Web:


« Last Edit: February 22, 2020, 04:24:16 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

  • Guest
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #280 on: February 23, 2020, 06:55:06 PM »
I've been studying the variety of barberry / berberis shrubs available lately, particularly for their heart-healthy and mitochondria-restoring PQQ content, which makes them somewhat unique in the plant world.  They should not be confused with bayberry.

The plants are naturalized in North America, and typically grow in zones 4-8.  They can harbor wheat rust, so we need to search for varieties certified against that disease.  The Japanese variety is also invasive. 

They typically have vivid-colored foliage in autumn, and either red or purple tart berries, which are the source of the phytochemical Berberine, where the PQQ is found. 

In the past, they have been planted primarily for their value as a natural hedge, due to sharp barbs, and to feed the birds in winter (deer avoid it).  More recently, dwarfing cultivars have been developed.  Need to check to see which ones also have berries, as some are fruitless.

The main mail-order nurseries that I've found these at have been:

Hirt's Gardens in Ohio

Greenwood Nursery in Tennessee

Kigi Nursery in Washington State

Brighter Blooms in South Carolina

One Green World in Oregon

New Life Nursery in South Carolina

Garden Crossings in Michigan

High Country Gardens in Utah

It may also be possible to obtain non-invasive and non-rust-harboring varieties of this genera free of charge from your local state forestry department, as it is widespread in forests. 

Numerous studies on the benefits of Berberine exist at the NIH / NCBI website. 

Also:

https://draxe.com/nutrition/barberry

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2018/04/15/pqq-berberine-mitochondrial-enhancers.aspx

The plant in the pic looks seriously familiar!  I wonder if it grows wild around here and will carefully look this year.  A search turned up a list of some plants that also contain berberine:  goldenseal and Oregon grape to name a couple.  And an article that is long but educational:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6111450/
Berberine: Botanical Occurrence, Traditional Uses, Extraction Methods, and Relevance in Cardiovascular, Metabolic, Hepatic, and Renal Disorders

R.R. Book

  • Members
  • Prolific Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9293
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #281 on: February 24, 2020, 10:33:41 AM »
Very interesting that the study says that Berberine / PQQ can be effectively taken during an active heart attack in progress!

It typically comes in a sublingual pill, so it's important to let it melt under the tongue slowly rather than chewing it - difficult to do because the pills are tart!

Am familiar with goldenseal, a wonderful plant that is endangered in these parts now.  Will look into Oregon Grape - thanks Ilinda!
« Last Edit: February 24, 2020, 10:45:28 AM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

  • Members
  • Prolific Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9293
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #282 on: February 24, 2020, 10:52:43 AM »
Ilinda's NCBI article noted that there are numerous folk uses of Barberry that have not yet been trialed.  Posting PFAF's exhaustive list of folk medicinal uses here, including both trialed and untrialed:

Quote
Barberries have long been used as an herbal remedy for the treatment of a variety of complaints. All parts of the plant can be used though the yellow root bark is the most concentrated source of active ingredients. The plant is mainly used nowadays as a tonic to the gallbladder to improve the flow of bile and ameliorate conditions such as gallbladder pain, gallstones and jaundice[254]. The bark and root bark are antiseptic, astringent, cholagogue, hepatic, purgative, refrigerant, stomachic and tonic[4, 7, 9, 21, 46, 165, 222]. The bark is harvested in the summer and can be dried for storing[4]. It is especially useful in cases of jaundice, general debility and biliousness[4], but should be used with caution[165]. The flowers and the stem bark are antirheumatic[218]. The roots are astringent and antiseptic[222]. They have been pulverized in a little water and used to treat mouth ulcers[213]. A tea of the roots and stems has been used to treat stomach ulcers[213]. The root bark has also been used as a purgative and treatment for diarrhoea[213] and is diaphoretic[222]. A tincture of the root bark has been used in the treatment of rheumatism, sciatica etc[222]. The root bark is a rich source of the alkaloid berberine -about 6%[240]. Berberine, universally present in rhizomes of Berberis species, has marked antibacterial effects. Since it is not appreciably absorbed by the body, it is used orally in the treatment of various enteric infections, especially bacterial dysentery[218]. It should not be used with Glycyrrhiza species (Liquorice) because this nullifies the effects of the berberine[218]. Berberine has also shown antitumour activity[218] and is also effective in the treatment of hypersensitive eyes, inflamed lids and conjunctivitis[244]. A tea made from the fruits is antipruritic, antiseptic, appetizer, astringent, diuretic, expectorant and laxative[7, 222]. It is also used as a febrifuge[213]. The fruit, or freshly pressed juice, is used in the treatment of liver and gall bladder problems, kidney stones, menstrual pains etc[9]. The leaves are astringent and antiscorbutic[7]. A tea made from the leaves is used in the treatment of coughs[222]. The plant (probably the inner bark) is used by homeopaths as a valuable remedy for kidney and liver insufficiency[244]. Other uses include malaria, and opium and morphine withdrawal[301].

Indian Uses of Native Plants (meaning American Indian) says that the Shoshone, Paiute and Blackfeet Indians used peeled/dried/steeped root of Berberis spp. as an anti-diarrheal.  The Blackfeet further boiled the roots for stomach problems and hemorrhaging. 

« Last Edit: February 24, 2020, 11:03:28 AM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

  • Members
  • Prolific Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9293
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #283 on: March 29, 2020, 05:52:53 AM »
Two nectarine varieties suitable for the North:

Hardired and Mericrest (one of Meador's trees - he was a famous breeder of orchard rootstock)

Both are cold-hardy, and actually need chill hours in order to produce.  Both have red skins and yellow flesh, and are resistant to brown rot and bacterial spot.  In addition, both are self-fertile (though most self-fertile trees do better with a mate). 

Both varieties are also known for high productivity, but note Ben Davidson's recent comment that trees will go through a period of infertility as the magnetosphere collapses en route to reversal.  So plant at your own risk, perhaps hedging your bet for the future.  :)


R.R. Book

  • Members
  • Prolific Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9293
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #284 on: April 01, 2020, 03:32:10 PM »
One of the finest newer American persimmon cultivars to be developed in recent years is "Szukis," from the Claypool breeding program (there are several other breeders who are equally distinguished for their own genealogies as well). 

Szukis descends from Early Golden, a remarkable antique persimmon from the 19th Century that has been heavily relied upon in breeding trials.  Early Golden itself had (and still has) much going for it, including both male and female flowers on the same tree, but its productivity is spotty according to breeding notes.

On the contrary, its descendant Szukis is a prolific producer of nearly 2" fruit (pretty large for these little date-apricot-like delicacies), while being among the most cold-hardy of all the persimmons.  I believe that "Taylor" developed up in Canada may exceed Szukis' cold hardiness.  And because Szukis bears both male and female blossoms, it is uniquely capable of pollinating other persimmons around it.

Only two nurseries that I'm aware of in the States carry Szukis, so it's somewhat rare: Nolin River in Kentucky, which is sold out for the year, and Cricket Hill Garden in New England, which had sold out quickly but managed to re-supply as of today:


Remember that American persimmons must be
dead ripe in order to taste sweet.

« Last Edit: April 01, 2020, 03:44:59 PM by R.R. Book »

 

Home Study System

Home Study System
Save 30%

BUY NOW

The ideal win-win survival community library reference system offers a broad range of valuable survival skills and knowledge. Ideal those in preparedness, it provides in-depth knowledge about how to form communities and operate two-way communications.

For human needs, it also includes a low-impact energy self-healing art and an essential role for seniors in survival communities.

A special note for those of you living outside the United States, we optimized this system for the lowest possible Priority Mail costs.

4 Paperbacks and 6 DVDs

Win-Win Survival Communities Signed

Radio Free Earth Color (Color Editon) Signed

Complete Danjeon Breathing System w/6 DVDs

Survival Wellness Advocacy and the BIG WIN

BUY NOW