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Author Topic: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes  (Read 22677 times)

R.R. Book

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #120 on: July 22, 2019, 01:55:59 PM »
I saw something amazing in the bee nectary garden today: A black swallowtail butterfly mating with a yellow swallowtail.  They were juxtaposed together in mid-air, and it was quite a sight to behold.  Here's the male having a sip of nectar just before the mating dance occurred:

In case he's difficult to spot, he's located in the lower center of this pic.

Here's an enlargement
« Last Edit: October 06, 2019, 12:27:37 PM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #121 on: August 21, 2019, 12:56:18 PM »
Dozens of homemade grease patties for winter bee feeding and herbal medication.  They are sandwiched between waxed paper sheets, cut into squares for quick feeding, sealed in a zip-lock bag and placed in the freezer:

« Last Edit: October 06, 2019, 12:28:23 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #122 on: August 22, 2019, 08:43:35 AM »
EXCELLENT idea!

R.R. Book

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #123 on: October 06, 2019, 12:18:31 PM »
Here are notes on the wonderful film which Ilinda had highly recommended: Queen of the Sun: What are the Bees Telling Us?


The film opens with vivid images of flowering plants and music reminiscent of Copeland's Appalachian Spring...

Quote
Colony collapse disorder is the bill we are getting for all we have done to the bees...
~Gunther Hauk, author of The Honeybee Crisis: An Opportunity to Transform Destructive Agricultural Practices and Real Food for Thought and Stomach: An Introduction to Biodynamic Agriculture (link unavailable) and Toward Saving the Honey Bee.

Quote
We have lost in America 5 million colonies, each one having 50,000 or 60,000 honey bees.  The bees are giving us messages, and their crisis is our crisis.  We could call it "colony collapse disorder" of the human being too.
~Gunther Hauk



Hauk / Hauck (alternate spellings exist for him) owns Spikenard Farm Honey Bee Sanctuary in Floyd, Virginia ( https://spikenardfarm.org/about-us/our-mission/ ). 

[I've personally visited and photographed that town, which is deep in the heart of Appalachia with an inimitable local culture centered at the Floyd Country Store, which hosts a radio program reminiscent of Garrison Keillor's Prairie Home Companion.  It also boasts clogging (an Appalachian form of dance) on the wooden floor, as well as live music and savory cooking made from scratch.
https://www.floydcountrystore.com/

Perhaps best of all is the drive down there (from a Northern perspective): One takes Skyline Drive through the Shenandoah Mountains at 40 mph for several hours of jaw-dropping mountain vistas, which then segues onto the Blue Ridge Parkway for a few more hours in which black bear cubs nibble wild berries along the road, and then one pretty much comes to the town without much of a foray off of that path.]R.B.


Continuing with the film:

Quote
The honey bee is important because we depend on it to pollinate 40% of our food...So 4 out of 10 bites that you consume, you would not be consuming if not for the work of the honey bee.
~Michael Pollan, author of Omnivore's Dilemma



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(Paraphrased due to broken English) In all the stories of the bees, bees have been in the world for 150 million years...and humans have only been interacting with them for 10,000 years.  A cooperation between them slowly began.

Quote
Beekeepers, they are chosen by bees.

Yvonne Achard of Grenoble, France

Quote
The honey bee was considered a sacred animal, and the sacredness came out of that knowledge that the honey bee is one of the great nurturers of life and fertility.
~Hauk

Honey was only given as a gift, never sold, until the late 19th or early 20th century.  It contains silica from the earth, which is necessary for all sensory organs in the human body. 

Rudolph Steiner presciently predicted that colony collapse disorder would manifest by the end of the 20th century, due to mechanization of the "industry."  The most egregious example in modern times is essentially the forcible relocation of thousands of hives annually to promote cropping of almonds on 600,000 acres of monoculture in California. 

[Interjection: A boycott on that crop may not be such a bad idea, though it may now be illegal to propose such a thing due to a law against speech that could be deemed a terroristic threat against agriculture.] R.B.

Michael Pollan then adds that 3/4 of the American bee population is conscripted to work the almond fields of California, and given high-fructose corn syrup to eat while there.  Because of the monoculture almond crop, there are no other significant blossoms in that area to sustain the bees more than two weeks out of the year.

Because there aren't enough American honey bees in existence to pollinate the almond crops, bees from Australia are being imported with all of their unfamiliar diseases.  The 75% of bees in the States that service the almond crops annually are exposed to these diseases and then sent back home with them, to be introduced into the wild. 

Quote
Millions of bees die every year while waiting in holding yards before pollination begins.

The problem with monoculture, says Raj Patel, is that you destroy an entire ecosystem to create it. 

Raj Patel is the author of
Stuffed and Starved: From Farm to Fork,
the Hidden Battle for the World Food System.


Quote
GMO crops in the heartland of America are, for the honey bees, deserts.  There is no forage - they can't exist there.
~Hauk

Quote
Honey is made by bees inside of a hive who have never seen the light, yet they are nourished by light.  Pollen is materialized light.  And they have the ability to free the light they have ingested, making snow white wax.  And then man can harvest the wax and make candles, so that at Christmas, the darkest time of the year, he can free the light again.
~Michael Thiele


Quote
Industrial farming is based on chemicals that were used for warfare.  They were used to kill human beings, and of course they instantly kill the pollinators.
~Vandanna Shiva, physicist ( http://www.queenofthesun.com/2010/11/vandana-shiva-physicist/ )

Quote
It's a much bigger problem than just agriculture; the lawns that are sprayed are so damaging to so many creatures that are part of the food chain.
~Hauk

Quote
Pesticides work like nerve gas on humans.  The bees cannot find their way back to the hive, and die.
~Carlo Petrini, President of Slow Food


Quote
When you see airplanes coming over and spraying, there's this tremendous feeling of not being able to do anything, and all of the beings that are hit by it are so vulnerable.
~Hauk

Quote
...Honey bees are distinctly lacking in enzymes that break down toxins.
~Mary Berenbaum, Entomologist at the University of Illinois


Quote
Bayer is responsible for the use and production of pesticides that kill bees.
~Petrini

Quote
In former times, canaries were used in the coal mines, and when the canaries stopped singing and stayed silent, it was time for the coal miners to leave the mountain...
~Gunther Friedmann, biodynamic beekeeper


Quote
The beauty of the seed, is out of one, you can get millions.  The beauty of the pollinator, is it turns that one into the millions.
~Dr. Shiva

« Last Edit: October 07, 2019, 06:39:29 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #124 on: October 06, 2019, 05:05:39 PM »
Nothing could be added to THAT!  Thanks for the review, and it makes me want to dig our copy out and rewatch.

Met a guy over the weekend whose name is Zach, and his business card reads, "Zach of All Trades", and some of his products/services are bee hives, capturing swarms, nucs in the spring, and more.  It would be nice to get the new hives along with the nucs from the same source.  Forgot to ask if he sells queens.  Are there any caveats about buying hives and nucs from same vendor?

R.R. Book

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #125 on: October 06, 2019, 05:44:43 PM »
The standard word of advice is this:

1. Never purchase used equipment (you don't know what may be lingering from bees that may have died in it)

2. Buy all your woodenware (if using vertical hives and not making them from scratch) from the same vendor, as each one may be a fraction of an inch off from another supplier, which can throw your whole hive a little off-kilter and be frustrating to work with.

He sounds like a versatile fellow!

ilinda

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #126 on: October 07, 2019, 08:10:32 PM »
Good idea about not buying woodenware from different vendors--hadn't even thought about the tiniest difference is size that is probably inevitable and makes "mix and match" not a viable option.

Hubby got into beekeeping years ago when a friend gave him used hives to get him started, which were probably contaminated with varroa mites, as his bees got infected very quickly after that.

Am thinking 2020 will be the year of the honeybee here.


R.R. Book

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #127 on: October 08, 2019, 06:16:11 AM »
Ilinda, regarding the inherited woodenware, it's possible that there may have been some mites still hiding in the empty boxes, but they need blood to feed on, and one wonders why the bees had vacated the boxes.  Had the colony died?  I'd be more concerned about American Foulbrood spores possibly remaining in them.

There are great lengths that possibly could be resorted to to salvage such boxes, but it's not recommended, and may be illegal (the local ag extension agent has the right to burn the boxes if disease is found upon inspection, but that's more likely to happen on a visit to a professional apiary - they never come out to inspect us with just a few hives, even though we're licensed).  It may be possible to immerse the boxes in alcohol, smoke them with an herbal disinfectant, torch them with a smaller controlled burn (such as with a long-handled BIC lighter, etc.), but I'm not experienced with this...just musing about how to be frugal when resources may be scarce to non-existent...

ilinda

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #128 on: October 09, 2019, 10:37:32 AM »
Good points.  We will probably start with brand new hives because of all the potential pitfalls associated with used ones.

Have always wondered if using Eastern Red Cedar boards would be a good idea.  Would the aroma of cedar be too strong?  Or would it help inhibit many different (micro-)organisms?  There was an article somewhere about a bee colony that had been living for decades in an ancient red cedar tree and the discussion included the question about the cedar scent's possible beneficial effect on bees.

R.R. Book

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #129 on: October 09, 2019, 10:43:34 AM »
What an excellent question Ilinda, and how about if we both research this and compare notes back on TH?

 

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