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Author Topic: Animal Husbandry  (Read 23035 times)

ilinda

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Re: Animal Husbandry
« Reply #30 on: July 10, 2017, 03:19:58 PM »
I'm fairly ignorant about the "coarseness" level of whetstones, as I only have one--it seems somewhat fine, although I haven't seen a "medium" or "coarse" stone.  I need to check into this matter.
I got a bunch of wetstones from China [Ebay] for a few bucks, several different levels of coarseness. I think such things might prove very useful when international trade dissolves...
And if those are lost or stolen, maybe people can find sandstone that can be fashioned into a sharpening stone.  Worth a try on an oudated blade to be used for practice.

Socrates

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Re: Animal Husbandry
« Reply #31 on: July 10, 2017, 08:03:35 PM »
people can find sandstone that can be fashioned into a sharpening stone.  Worth a try on an oudated blade to be used for practice.
Any stone be used for sharpening a knife with, including concrete. Professional wetstones today, however, are of very specific grades. Once you lose those, it'll probably be some centuries or millennia before such quality can be achieved again.
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ilinda

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Re: Animal Husbandry
« Reply #32 on: July 11, 2017, 03:45:12 PM »
people can find sandstone that can be fashioned into a sharpening stone.  Worth a try on an oudated blade to be used for practice.
Any stone be used for sharpening a knife with, including concrete. Professional wetstones today, however, are of very specific grades. Once you lose those, it'll probably be some centuries or millennia before such quality can be achieved again.
But sandstone is rather easy to work with, so that would be my first choice.  Before the IR, many who sharpened tools used native stone(s) rather than manufactured, mass-produced ones.  Where there's a will, there's a way.

ilinda

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Re: Animal Husbandry
« Reply #33 on: August 27, 2017, 05:29:30 PM »
Not sure if this is exactly animal husbandry, but by stretching the definition a bit, it is.

We always welcome garden spiders in our garden as they are beneficial to us all, well, except to their prey.  So far, I can only find two different garden spiders in our main garden this year, and they are only a few feet apart.  The larger of the two had been wrapping up a Japanese Beetle this morning, so hurray for Ms. Garden Spider.

 Because Japanese Beetles are so destructive to just about all vegetation, they're not welcome in the garden, so I send the message out to the Universe to all birds and others who eat Japanese Beetles to "come one, come all".  I like to think of pampering, and caring for garden spiders as Spider Husbandry.
Here is the beautiful one.

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Re: Animal Husbandry
« Reply #34 on: August 27, 2017, 06:02:42 PM »
What a great late summer theme Ilinda!  She is a beauty.  Normally I hate all spiders except Grandaddy Longlegs.  In the woods we have some real oddballs.  Will try and snap some photos.  I do hope not to see any trapdoor spiders this year, but they have always signaled colder weather is on the way. :)

Socrates

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breeds
« Reply #35 on: October 26, 2017, 05:33:31 PM »
Here i'm watching this vid on this guy in the desert raising chickens and he's talking about his breed of pigs that don't dig and live mainly off of grass... I had no idea.
I guess animals can be kinda like flora in that there are all kind of variations with all kind of preferences and needs. He's also talking about his sheep that are heat-tolerant and don't need to be sheared.
This kind of information brings up solutions that make all kind of situations successful (that might otherwise fail).
[Thank god for the information age...]
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Socrates

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choosing animals
« Reply #36 on: November 15, 2017, 11:53:52 PM »
Modern 'agriculture' and animal husbandry practices have conditioned society, culture and people to certain trains of thought concerning keeping animals. Such thoughts can totally lead one astray from practices that are sustainable or that serve survival interests.
For one, the modern mindset is about conquering nature, not achieving a balance with her. And even so-called preppers or survivalists can fall into this trap; your skills, knowledge or training, do you use them to work with nature or to overcome her? When confronted with hard times, it's expected that one suspend certain ideals in order to make it through them, but what if sticking to your guns actually offers the best options for survival?
And what do such matters have to do with keeping animals?


I say animals can best be viewed from a point of resources. Nature in general is about utilizing what resources you have in tune / balance / harmony with nature. And animals are a great resource [particularly as source of calories], but mainly they are because they themselves source the environment in ways humans cannot or will not do as efficiently.
One can view animals from various viewpoints, like guardian / meat / ruminant / fowl / dairy / leather / etc. etc. etc. But where do they source whatever they offer?
I mean, a guardian dog is wonderful, but donkeys and mules also make good guardian animals, like geese and llamas. Dogs are carnivores whereas geese, llamas and donkeys are herbivorous. Which can you feed?

In the end your choice of what animals to keep has more to do with whether or not you can feed them than it has to do with what they may offer, for if you can't keep your goose laying golden eggs alive, you'd be better off with an option (you may initially feel is second choice) that is sustainable and feasible.
Therefore, there are really only 4 kinds of animals:
- canivores
- herbivores
- omnivores
- grass eaters

Now, there are common misconceptions concerning such things, like people keeping goats on grass when goats should be eating from greens, say, above shoulder height. Yes, animals like goats and rabbits do eat grass, but they are not grass eaters like sheep, geese, certain ducks or cattle are.
What can you source? Can you only stock up on hay? Then you need a grass eater. (And maybe you should stock up on grass seed, as well...)

Within such restraints / options there are choices to make. For instance, there are pigs that mainly live off of grass and are not like truly omnivorous pig breeds that dig and forage and eat anything. There are cattle, but there are also miniature breeds. The same goes for many species.

A pig is omnivorous, but so are muscovy 'ducks', chickens and some goats.
It depends on what you can source. And maybe you can get insects to source what you have to offer and your chickens can (in part) live off of those...


There are other considerations, like pack animals; a donkey is wonderful, but let's say you get yourself some alaskan malamutes; these live for pulling stuff around. So as long as the terrain you're at isn't too rugged for that kind of thing, they are an option. But both also make good guardian animals. There are pros and cons to each species but in the end the question is whether or not you can feed them.

Ultimately, i dare say it all again comes down to location, for what do your surroundings offer in the way of resourcing food? Mountain or plain? Snow or desert? Dry or wet?
Once you have determined your best option for survival location, you should choose livestock accordingly. (And stock up for if conditions temporarily change drastically.)
« Last Edit: April 05, 2019, 08:33:26 AM by Socrates »
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the best animals to transport...
« Reply #37 on: April 24, 2020, 03:41:42 AM »
With the world going crazy due to this COVID-19 bs [Joel Salatin citing research; Stanford's Jay Bhattacharya suggesting mortality rates are far lower than assumed] and the transportation/travel lockdown, i got to thinking: how can i get animals to my safe location if i can barely cross the border myself?
And then i thought: "Eggs"...

If one only had chickens, geese, guinea fowl and muscovy ducks, one would have a variety of animals to do most work that needs to be done on a homestead.
- chickens are omnivores that scratch up the ground
- scobies are omnivores that dig up the ground [kinda like a pig] [slugs]
- geese are herbivores as well as guardian animals
- guinea fowl make wonderful watch animals [sound alarm readily], eat arachnids and chase away snakes
When you get to where you're going, you either plug in your incubator or find a farmer with a broody chicken. Bob's your uncle.

I guess one might be able to bring along some (baby) rabbits or guinea pigs, too. Silk worms?
« Last Edit: April 24, 2020, 12:34:47 PM by Socrates »
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R.R. Book

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Re: Animal Husbandry
« Reply #38 on: April 24, 2020, 05:15:54 AM »
If you get to where you're going soon enough, you probably won't need to worry about smuggling in the eggs, as breeders will likely have the livestock that you desire, or be able to source it for you.  That allows you to establish an ally that you'll be able to work with later, as he or she would already be rural-based, and be in a good position for survival, perhaps minus the cave.

Love the part about guinea fowl eating arachnids and chasing snakes...Must look further into this myself!  :)


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Re: peafowl
« Reply #39 on: April 24, 2020, 05:39:50 AM »
Yeah, my son suggested peacocks [peafowl] and i diligently looked into it. Turns out that they're very hardy and perhaps a much better option than many may assume. But in researching those, i also ran into info on guinea fowl. I'd heard they just make a lot of racket and were therefore perhaps more trouble than they're worth, but my impression is now otherwise.

Transporting only eggs would of course be a last-ditch effort to bring animals along, perhaps when even borders are closed down completely but it's still possible to cross through forests on foot.

Check out this heart-warming vid on a chicken that gets a duckling to care for.
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ilinda

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Re: peafowl
« Reply #40 on: April 24, 2020, 07:32:09 PM »
Yeah, my son suggested peacocks [peafowl] and i diligently looked into it. Turns out that they're very hardy and perhaps a much better option than many may assume. But in researching those, i also ran into info on guinea fowl. I'd heard they just make a lot of racket and were therefore perhaps more trouble than they're worth, but my impression is now otherwise.
We had neighbors years ago who had peafowl and we would periodically hear some shrieking, screaming,screeching, etc., coming from their land, and honestly we wondered if someone was being murdered.  But after a "few murders", we realized they  have peafowl. 

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Re: peafowl
« Reply #41 on: April 25, 2020, 01:44:32 PM »
Yeah, my son suggested peacocks [peafowl] and i diligently looked into it. Turns out that they're very hardy and perhaps a much better option than many may assume. But in researching those, i also ran into info on guinea fowl. I'd heard they just make a lot of racket and were therefore perhaps more trouble than they're worth, but my impression is now otherwise.
We had neighbors years ago who had peafowl and we would periodically hear some shrieking, screaming,screeching, etc., coming from their land, and honestly we wondered if someone was being murdered.  But after a "few murders", we realized they  have peafowl.

"After a few murders..."   ;)

 

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