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Author Topic: Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells  (Read 14284 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells
« Reply #45 on: April 14, 2019, 11:19:01 AM »
For the record I don't know if I should be eating bread or not... it is currently sort of a weakness for me.

One thing that worked for me in previous decades was the Essene Bread, which I got frozen in the west coast health food stores.
Michael and I consumed practically no refined carbs in those days (family birthdays and holidays being the exception.)
What we did for a treat, since we did crave treats, was lightly toast the Essene bread (loaded with sprouted wheat, etc.) and put some ghee or cream cheese, or both, on top. :) Wow that was good.
...................................
Screen shot: apple slices with tahini, or this could be almond or cashew butter.

Another treat for me was organic apple slices with Tahini on them. 
Tahini, aka sesame butter tasted good to me with apple. I don't think I had ever heard of anyone else eating this combo, sort of discovered it in the early 1970s. Not sure if it would qualify as a keto treat. The sesame is high protein, high fat.  (Also part of my diet was almond and cashew butter, but peanut butter seems to agree with me fine too, I liked it on celery.)

Screen shot is from:  https://blog.thatcleanlife.com/ways-to-use-tahini/

ilinda

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Re: Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells
« Reply #46 on: April 14, 2019, 06:48:56 PM »
Thanks for that info on sourdough Ilinda!

I must say that I rec'd the "ZeroCarb" bread this weekend, and found it to taste exactly like cardboard, and was also hard on my stomach.  Wonder if sourdough, with its fermentation process, might count as a "Net Carb" food?
I confess to initially laughing at your "cardboard bread" and the sad thing is you paid money for it!

I don't know how sourdough counts, but after reading the article, am betting it is way down the list.  I know we both love it, and here is an accidental bonus:  the sourdough bread I bake here seems to never spoil.  No kidding, it will last several months if we don't eat it.  I have noticed its extremely long shelf life so a couple of times I let the last piece or hunk of it sit around for a month or two and it stayed good looking, so finally I'd eat it and it tasted just like fresh bread (not warm, first day bread of course).

My recipe is rather simple:  since I never measure anything, the size of the loaf depends on the size of the eventual blob I get after mixing, then kneading.

First take a large blob or two from your sourdough starter, making certain to close the container quickly, especially if it's summer and your kitchen is warm.

Mash a banana in your mixing bowl.  Add several glugs or a slurry of blackstrap molasses, then mix and stir well.  Now add that sourdough blob, and start mixing and stirring.  It will need more flour unless your sourdough starter is really a dry version.  (Mine is a cement-like slurry, thus very watery.)  Gradually add a little flour at a time (I use spelt or einkorn) mixing it in well, before adding more.

When your dough ball is much drier, dump it out on a floured surface and begin kneading in more flour, a small amount at a time.  I usually knead about 20-30 minutes.  You will know when you are ready to move to the next step because the doughball will be so dry that it will not accept any more flour.

Oil your loaf pan, and oil the loaf, placing it into the pan, and flattening it a bit to conform to the pan. 

Place your covered loaf pan in a warm area (I use toaster oven on absolute lowest setting @ around 95 deg. F), and let it remain there for a day or two.  You want it to rise slowly, as the longer it rises, the more thoroughly the phytates/phytic acids are converted to something more useful, and the more easily assilimated are the minerals, etc.

Turn oven on to 325 deg. F, remove cover from pan, and bake for 35 minutes, depending on your oven.  After removing from oven, let cool 5 minutes before trying to remove loaf or it will tear and break.  (Don't be anxious. :-D)

After about 30 minutes cut a slice and slather olive oil or "grass butter" liberally, and enjoy.  Or toast before oiling.

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Re: Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells
« Reply #47 on: April 15, 2019, 05:19:37 AM »
Thanks Ilinda - It sounds do-able and well worth trying!  :)

Yowbarb

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Re: Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells
« Reply #48 on: May 02, 2019, 01:33:52 AM »
Thanks for that info on sourdough Ilinda!

I must say that I rec'd the "ZeroCarb" bread this weekend, and found it to taste exactly like cardboard, and was also hard on my stomach.  Wonder if sourdough, with its fermentation process, might count as a "Net Carb" food?
I confess to initially laughing at your "cardboard bread" and the sad thing is you paid money for it!

I don't know how sourdough counts, but after reading the article, am betting it is way down the list.  I know we both love it, and here is an accidental bonus:  the sourdough bread I bake here seems to never spoil.  No kidding, it will last several months if we don't eat it.  I have noticed its extremely long shelf life so a couple of times I let the last piece or hunk of it sit around for a month or two and it stayed good looking, so finally I'd eat it and it tasted just like fresh bread (not warm, first day bread of course).

My recipe is rather simple:  since I never measure anything, the size of the loaf depends on the size of the eventual blob I get after mixing, then kneading.

First take a large blob or two from your sourdough starter, making certain to close the container quickly, especially if it's summer and your kitchen is warm.

Mash a banana in your mixing bowl.  Add several glugs or a slurry of blackstrap molasses, then mix and stir well.  Now add that sourdough blob, and start mixing and stirring.  It will need more flour unless your sourdough starter is really a dry version.  (Mine is a cement-like slurry, thus very watery.)  Gradually add a little flour at a time (I use spelt or einkorn) mixing it in well, before adding more.

When your dough ball is much drier, dump it out on a floured surface and begin kneading in more flour, a small amount at a time.  I usually knead about 20-30 minutes.  You will know when you are ready to move to the next step because the doughball will be so dry that it will not accept any more flour.

Oil your loaf pan, and oil the loaf, placing it into the pan, and flattening it a bit to conform to the pan. 

Place your covered loaf pan in a warm area (I use toaster oven on absolute lowest setting @ around 95 deg. F), and let it remain there for a day or two.  You want it to rise slowly, as the longer it rises, the more thoroughly the phytates/phytic acids are converted to something more useful, and the more easily assilimated are the minerals, etc.

Turn oven on to 325 deg. F, remove cover from pan, and bake for 35 minutes, depending on your oven.  After removing from oven, let cool 5 minutes before trying to remove loaf or it will tear and break.  (Don't be anxious. :-D)

After about 30 minutes cut a slice and slather olive oil or "grass butter" liberally, and enjoy.  Or toast before oiling.

Wow that sounds good!

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Re: Ketosis and Cancer. Ketogenic diet weakens cancer cells
« Reply #49 on: May 23, 2019, 05:32:56 PM »
Mary Greeley posted an article yesterday saying that a link has been inferred in a recent study between ketogenic diets (calling them extremely low-carb instead) and a shortened life-span. 

Perhaps more data is needed before the inference can become firmly established:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VlXYa3f11Lo

 

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