Win-Win Survival Communities The Kolbrin Bible Complete Danjeon Breathing System Radio Free Earth

Author Topic: Respiratory conditions - colds, flu, bronchitis, pleurisy, asthma, COPD, etc.  (Read 5815 times)

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Hi All, I just came across this on Facebook. This is from a lady in Australia. Wanted to share it:
...


"...Best thing to get to clear the lungs is fusion cough and lung tonic get it from health food store clear my lungs in two days."
...
This page has reviews of the product: other info on page too...


https://www.fusionhealth.com.au/products/cough-lung-tonic   Fusion Cough Lung Tonic

How it works

In traditional Chinese medicine, the Lung organ-meridian system encompasses not just the lungs themselves but also the sinuses, throat, mouth and skin. Together, these tissues play a vital role in immunity by helping to disperse Defensive Qi (a specific form of vital energy or Qi that helps you fend off disease) throughout your body.

According to Chinese philosophy, it is natural for the Lung Qi to disperse in a descending direction. However, when you’re affected by an upper respiratory infection such as a cold, flu or bronchitis, your Lung Qi may accumulate and eventually move upwards instead of downwards, triggering a cough.

Fusion Health Cough Lung Tonic™ contains the Chinese herbs Pinellia, which has traditionally been used to promote the descent of Lung Qi and Balloon Flower, which aids its dispersion in the body.

Also present are a synergistic blend of Chinese and Western herbs that have traditionally been used to relieve both wet and dry coughs and promote the expulsion of mucus, including Aster, Licorice, Elecampane and White Horehound.

Always read the label. Use only as directed. If symptoms persist consult your healthcare practitioner.

[More on page]

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Some people who have tried the Fusion cough and lung tonic have been able to go off some off their asthma or COPD meds.
I am going to try it...

Yowbarb

  • Guest

R.R. Book

  • Members
  • Prolific Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9293
  • Karma: +21/-0
Barb, Thanks for all the great info - I didn't know that platycodon was medicinally useful.  I've been wanting to grow this plant for a long time, and as it is a late summer flower, there's still time yet. :)

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Barb, Thanks for all the great info - I didn't know that platycodon was medicinally useful.  I've been wanting to grow this plant for a long time, and as it is a late summer flower, there's still time yet. :)

R.R. I really admire that you do the growing and actually make the herbal decoctions.
Can you let me know if you feel this is a good reference:


https://theherbalacademy.com/herbal-decoction/

Post to us what is the best reference you have...
- Yowbarb  PS I posted another reference book here:  Topic, Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #200 on: Today at 10:32:22 AM »

https://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=384.new#new 

A highly-rated reference:
Medical Herbalism: The Science Principles and Practices Of Herbal Medicine Hardcover – October 24, 2003
by David Hoffmann

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Barb, Thanks for all the great info - I didn't know that platycodon was medicinally useful.  I've been wanting to grow this plant for a long time, and as it is a late summer flower, there's still time yet. :)

I have seen this plant in people's front yards here in the south...
R.R. Best of luck in growing the lovely
Platycodon grandiflorus.
:)
...
https://www.herbal-supplement-resource.com/balloon-flower.html

"Balloon flower prefers nutrient-rich, moist, well-drained, sandy soil and needs a full sun. The plant is propagated by seeds in spring and by cuttings in summer. Plants grown from balloon flower seeds bloom first in their second year.' "The roots are harvested in the spring or autumn from two or three-year old plants. In Japan, the young leaves are eaten and used in salads and in Korea the roots with the outer bark removed, are used in soups, pickled, or preserved in syrup. The root has somewhat bitter taste. "

 :)


Yowbarb

  • Guest
Yowbarb Note: Pharyngitis is also a type of respiratory condition.
PLS see farther below in this post a reference for an ancient Japanese herbal treatment.
...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pharyngitis

Pharyngitis is typically a type of respiratory tract infection. Most cases are caused by a viral infection. Strep throat is the cause in about 25% of children and 10% of adults. Uncommon causes include other bacteria such as gonorrhea, fungus, irritants such as smoke, allergies, and gastroesophageal reflux disease.
...
One excerpt from this herbal page: ...
https://www.herbal-supplement-resource.com/balloon-flower.html

"Balloon flower is one of the eight herbs found in the Japanese folk remedy “Sho-saiko-to-ka-kikyo-sekko” that is used to treat pharyngitis or acute tonsillitis. This remedy is composed of few minerals and the herbs bupleurum (Bupleurum chinensis), pinellia (Pinellia ternata), baikal skullcap (Scutellaria baicalensi), jujube fruit (Ziziphus zizyphus), ginseng root (Panax Ginseng), licorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabra) and ginger rhizome (Zingiber officinale)."
...
Getty Images: CG of Japanese Painting, Balloon Flower - Tokyo, Japan

http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/illustration/of-japanese-painting-balloon-flower-royalty-free-illustration/111768441?esource=SEO_GIS_CDN_Redirect

R.R. Book

  • Members
  • Prolific Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9293
  • Karma: +21/-0
Quote
Can you let me know if you feel this is a good reference:

Great stuff Barb! 

One thought on any published book on herbs: With the help of the Internet, we now have nearly instantaneous access to international clinical trial results, especially through the NIH website.  So we might want to check the publication date on any printed volume on herbal medicine, and then see what clinical trials have been completed and published for peer review in the meantime on whatever it is that we're looking up.  The allopathic medical community takes more interest in some herbs than others, and significant changes in the knowledge base about a particular herb's medicinal properties can occur in a short time.  For example, there can be newer clinical findings that reverse old findings, or shed new light on them, such as newer dosage recommendations, contraindications, and so forth.

That being said, when the power grid goes down and we no longer have an Internet, the printed volumes will be priceless.  Those who may be called upon to "practice medicine without a license," which could potentially be anyone who survives into the Aftertime, may at least want to stay abreast, while it's still possible, of newer findings on certain key herbs that they might expect to work with.  :)

ilinda

  • Guest
Barb, Thanks for all the great info - I didn't know that platycodon was medicinally useful.  I've been wanting to grow this plant for a long time, and as it is a late summer flower, there's still time yet. :)

R.R. I really admire that you do the growing and actually make the herbal decoctions.
Can you let me know if you feel this is a good reference:


https://theherbalacademy.com/herbal-decoction/
I read through several entries and it looks informative, as I do decoctions when using mullein for productive cough in respiratory infection, and this stuff works, however I always emphasize that mullein leaves must be decocted, rather than just made into a tea.  I boil them about 30 minutes before straining.

So, I'd agree that theherbalacademy.com/ is a good source of information.

ilinda

  • Guest
Quote
Can you let me know if you feel this is a good reference:

Great stuff Barb! 

One thought on any published book on herbs: With the help of the Internet, we now have nearly instantaneous access to international clinical trial results, especially through the NIH website.  So we might want to check the publication date on any printed volume on herbal medicine, and then see what clinical trials have been completed and published for peer review in the meantime on whatever it is that we're looking up.  The allopathic medical community takes more interest in some herbs than others, and significant changes in the knowledge base about a particular herb's medicinal properties can occur in a short time.  For example, there can be newer clinical findings that reverse old findings, or shed new light on them, such as newer dosage recommendations, contraindications, and so forth.

That being said, when the power grid goes down and we no longer have an Internet, the printed volumes will be priceless.  Those who may be called upon to "practice medicine without a license," which could potentially be anyone who survives into the Aftertime, may at least want to stay abreast, while it's still possible, of newer findings on certain key herbs that they might expect to work with.  :)
Good points.  Those interested in herbal and other traditional heal(th) methods are probably subconsciously working toward that goal.  I have dried some foxglove leaves this year and have a good batch of milk thistle beginning to flower, hopefully for seeds.  A little bit at a time each week or so is all it takes to amass a nice stash of helpful items.

R.R. Book

  • Members
  • Prolific Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9293
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: common healing herbs
« Reply #10 on: July 16, 2017, 04:26:49 PM »
Ilinda, It sounds as if you'll be well equipped when the time comes! :)

« Last Edit: July 16, 2017, 05:07:05 PM by R.R. Book »

Socrates

  • Members
  • Prolific Member
  • *
  • Posts: 999
  • Karma: +15/-0
  • literally, I've seen the end in a vision; DEADLY!
    • TEOMCROTE
prevention
« Reply #11 on: July 16, 2017, 10:41:43 PM »
Bought a WWII gas mask at the local flea market last Saturday for 10 bucks  :D
survival database
location, civilisation reboot, PERMACULTURE, postcataclysmic soil, Growing Soil 1.01

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: prevention
« Reply #12 on: July 17, 2017, 10:29:58 AM »
Bought a WWII gas mask at the local flea market last Saturday for 10 bucks  :D

A good idea!
:)

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Quote
Can you let me know if you feel this is a good reference:

Great stuff Barb! 

One thought on any published book on herbs: With the help of the Internet, we now have nearly instantaneous access to international clinical trial results, especially through the NIH website.  So we might want to check the publication date on any printed volume on herbal medicine, and then see what clinical trials have been completed and published for peer review in the meantime on whatever it is that we're looking up.  The allopathic medical community takes more interest in some herbs than others, and significant changes in the knowledge base about a particular herb's medicinal properties can occur in a short time.  For example, there can be newer clinical findings that reverse old findings, or shed new light on them, such as newer dosage recommendations, contraindications, and so forth.

That being said, when the power grid goes down and we no longer have an Internet, the printed volumes will be priceless.  Those who may be called upon to "practice medicine without a license," which could potentially be anyone who survives into the Aftertime, may at least want to stay abreast, while it's still possible, of newer findings on certain key herbs that they might expect to work with.  :)

R.R. thanks so much for your feed back on this reference.
also, I agree, any printed out material, books, pamphlets will be priceless in the years to come.
Regardless of what happens and when, people need to start  gathering materials about herbology, medicine and all sorts of practical necessary actions for survival.
I'd say put them in waterproof sealed plastic, waterproof boxes.  Fire Resistant Document Pouches too.
Valuable documents, land deeds, contact info, identification, and all printed materials for survival.

ilinda

  • Guest
Re: prevention
« Reply #14 on: July 17, 2017, 02:40:49 PM »
Bought a WWII gas mask at the local flea market last Saturday for 10 bucks  :D
Curious about the composition of the filtering material?  Does it look substantial?  Have you donned the mask and then opened and smelled a fresh bottle of chlorine bleach?  Ammonia?  Think of some other noxious substances which emit vapors and try them as well.  If you do anything like this, we'd love to hear a report.  Logic tells me you should not smell any of the things you are testing.  Think of Sarin gas.  If you "smell" it, you're probably dead soon.


 

Home Study System

Home Study System
Save 30%

BUY NOW

The ideal win-win survival community library reference system offers a broad range of valuable survival skills and knowledge. Ideal those in preparedness, it provides in-depth knowledge about how to form communities and operate two-way communications.

For human needs, it also includes a low-impact energy self-healing art and an essential role for seniors in survival communities.

A special note for those of you living outside the United States, we optimized this system for the lowest possible Priority Mail costs.

4 Paperbacks and 6 DVDs

Win-Win Survival Communities Signed

Radio Free Earth Color (Color Editon) Signed

Complete Danjeon Breathing System w/6 DVDs

Survival Wellness Advocacy and the BIG WIN

BUY NOW