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Author Topic: Tamari soy sauce: Salad dressing, bulk survival meals rice, noodles, cornmeal  (Read 3231 times)

Yowbarb

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Just adding this here because it is another concentrated, flavorful food full of enzymes...
Seems like a good stash of this would be a welcome addition to a survival group's fare.

Just a bit of this along with any kind of noodles, nice yumm!!
One thing some people like (not everyone) season up corn meal mush or even cooked oats with soy sauce.
I used to season all my grains with tamari... I think it helps me digest foods like that...

This is an example of the item, this is a five gallon size. Cost is $169 but well worth it. Using it to season pots of cooked rice, noodles, corn meal mush or make dressing for salad or cooked veg, for a group would take perhaps a half cup... Using it like that, it should last 160 days or so.
A few of those would actually be a budget stretcher and give the group some food source to help digest starchy staples...

Corn meal mush, grits oats, many people like to sweeten them but I have found they are so good as a savoury food, with soy sauce, sometimes a dash of garlic salt.



https://www.amazon.com/Organic-Gold-Tamari-Wheat-Sauce/dp/B00O85TLDU/ref=sr_1_51_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1510842492&sr=8-51&keywords=soy+sauce+tamari

Yowbarb

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Macrobiotic Tamari salad dressing

Note from Barb: I can't seem to find this recipe online...
Got the basic recipe out of macrobiotic cook book back in 1970. Made this.

Tamari soy sauce (fermented traditional Japanese type) mixed 50-50 with sesame oil.
Grate some orange zest in there. Yumm!!

This calls for sesame oil but if bulk-sized vegetable oil is all you have in your survival stores, use that.

Yowbarb

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http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=110

What's New and Beneficial About Soy Sauce

Recent studies suggest that soy sauce may be able to provide some digestive tract benefits. These benefits are related to the soy sauce fermentation process, and the creation of certain unique carbohydrates (called oligosaccharides) during this process. Some of the micro-organisms involved with soy sauce fermentation contain enyzmes that can break apart unique fibers (hemicelluloses) found in soybeans. When these hemicelluloses are broken apart, oligosaccharides are produced, and these oligosaccharides can help support the growth of "friendly" bacteria in our large intestine. (These bacteria include the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus.)

Soy sauce is widely regarded as a salty food, and that perception is correct, since it's not unusual for a tablespoon of soy sauce to contain 1,000 milligrams of sodium. ("Salt" and "sodium" can be used pretty much interchangeably in this context, since table salt is composed of sodium and chloride; it's the sodium part that is involved with health problems in salt-sensitive individuals.) It's true that 1,000 milligrams of sodium is a large amount. In fact, it's nearly half of the recommended limit for sodium intake in an entire day. As a high-sodium food, soy sauce might be expected to be associated with increased risk of certain cardiovascular problems, including high blood pressure, since a certain percentage of individuals are salt-sensitive and experience blood pressure increases alongside of a high-salt diet. Yet, what's interesting is that recent research studies have suggested that soy sauce may be different than other high-salt foods with respect to our blood pressure and cardiovascular health. When soy sauce is fermented in the traditional way, many of the proteins found in the soybeans get broken down into smaller molecules called peptides. Some of these peptides act to inhibit the activity of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) that is needed to constrict our blood vessels. Our blood pressure tends to goes up when our blood vessels constrict because there is less room for our blood to flow through. By decreasing ACE activity, peptides in soy sauce may be able to help prevent this process from happening.
It's still too early in the research process to give soy sauce any kind of "green light" in terms of its salt content, however. Anyone at risk of excessive salt intake or following a salt-restricted diet should still consult with a healthcare provider before including more soy sauce in a meal plan than would otherwise be allowed based on sodium content.

Since soybeans are one of the eight food types most commonly associated with food allergy in the U.S., many people assume that soy sauce is a food with greater-than-usual potential to cause allergy problems. However, new research in this area suggests that soy sauce may be a far less allergenic form of soy that may actually provide support to our immune and inflammatory systems, which are typically involved in an allergic response. Two factors are especially fascinating in this new research. First is the breakdown of key allergy-triggering proteins in soybeans during the soy sauce fermentation process. (For example, an allergy-triggering protein in soybeans called Gly m Bd 30K gets broken down during soy sauce fermentation, and once this protein has been broken down into smaller parts, it can no longer trigger an allergenic response.) Second are the immune and inflammatory system benefits provided by unique soy sauce polysaccharides. Some of these carbohydrate-family molecules can lessen the activity of an enzyme called hyaluronidase. Overactivity of this enzyme is associated with increased inflammation and also with increased likelihood of allergic reaction. By lowering its activity, soy sauce polysaccharides may be able to lower the chances of an allergic reaction.

In an equally fascinating twist, allergic reaction to the soy sauce itself might not be the only allergy risk that is lowered by these polysaccharides. In preliminary studies on small groups of students, supplementation with soy sauce polysaccharides has been found to lessen the occurrence of seasonal allergy symptoms. Students in the studies were given soy sauce polysaccharide supplements rather than soy sauce itself, with the polysaccharide content of the supplements being equivalent to approximately 2 ounces of soy sauce each day. We won't be able to know whether soy sauce itself will be equally effective without future studies. Still, the direction of this research is fascinating since it involves a food traditionally associated with heightened allergy risk. Important Note: persons with known or suspected soy allergy should still consult with a healthcare provider before making a decision about soy sauce in their meal plan.

WHFoods Recommendation

We highly recommend that you look for a soy sauce that is traditionally made (more details on what this means in the Description section). Also, it's important to find one that doesn't have artificial colors or flavors, including caramel coloring. Many supermarkets and Asian groceries now offer these additive-free varieties; natural food stores also are a very good source for them. If you are have a wheat sensitivity, wheat-free versions are available. These are sometimes labeled as "tamari." (Please note though that "tamari" is actually a broader class of soy sauce that reflects that it is made with either less or no wheat).

We recommend selection of certified organic soy sauce. For soy sauce produced within the U.S., one of the major reasons we like certified organic soy sauce is the widespread use of genetic modification in non-organic soybeans. Genetically modified (GM) soybeans have reached 90% market penetration in the U.S. For soy sauce produced in other countries like Japan, Korea, China, or Indonesia, even though the likelihood of genetic modification might be less, we still like certified organic soy sauce due to the lower risk of unwanted contaminants like pesticides. In the case of non-U.S. soy sauce, you may not find the USDA organic seal on the product, but you should still look for the words "certified organic" or "organic certified" on the product label.

An Important Message About Soy Sauce

We have placed soy foods (such as Soy Sauce) on our "10 Most Controversial WHFoods List." This list was created to let you know that even though some foods (like soy sauce) can make an outstanding contribution to your meal plan, they are definitely not for everyone. Soy foods can be difficult to find in high-quality form; can be more commonly associated with adverse reactions than other foods; and can present more challenges to our food supply in terms of sustainability.
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R.R. Book

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Barb, That same brand of grits is available with an organic label (non-GMO).  A quick, nutritious meal can be made by cooking up a cup of grits, letting butter melt on top, and dumping an over-easy (runny yolk) egg on top and stirring it in, with some sea salt of course!  It makes a nice meal in a mug.  In a survival situation without eggs, egg powder could be substituted for extra protein.  I hope everyone considers keeping one hen per family member, which should provide everyone in the family roughly an egg per day for at least a few years.  There should be ample decomposition insects available for them to forage on in the aftertime :)


Yowbarb

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Barb, That same brand of grits is available with an organic label (non-GMO).  A quick, nutritious meal can be made by cooking up a cup of grits, letting butter melt on top, and dumping an over-easy (runny yolk) egg on top and stirring it in, with some sea salt of course!  It makes a nice meal in a mug.  In a survival situation without eggs, egg powder could be substituted for extra protein.  I hope everyone considers keeping one hen per family member, which should provide everyone in the family roughly an egg per day for at least a few years.  There should be ample decomposition insects available for them to forage on in the aftertime :)



RR, thanks! That's a great find!
That recipe sounds so good and so filling! I hadn't thought of doing that...will try it...
Totally agree such a good idea to keep hens...

Yowbarb

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The hens scratching around on the property could help rehabilitate and fertilize the soil too, in the aftertime.
A gradual process but seems it should really help...

Yowbarb

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Yowbarb Note:
Here is one example of the bulk Tamari soy sauce, one highly rated brand. You could get smaller glass bottles to store and fill when the need arises to use the survival foods.

San J Organic Gluten Free Tamari Soy Sauce, 5 Gallon Drum -- 1 each.
$138.95
/case

Yowbarb

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Here is the by guess and by golly salad dressing recipe which I have made:

About equal parts Tamari soy sauce and oil. Sesame or corn,
Put in a little bowl or container, grate some orange rind into it.
I suppose there might be some kind of dried rind you could purchase and store.

Note: A good quality oil always preferred but use whatever you have in survival supplies

I feel the combination of ingredients helps break down  foods, it softens the greens and help a person digest the starchy foods. Good on rice, corn meal, any noodle or grain you have on hand.

Yowbarb

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Barb note
This page has several Tamari salad dressing recipes. Ingredients vary. Some recipes use ginger, some orange juice, carrot

https://www.yummly.com/recipes/salad-dressing-tamari

Yowbarb

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Fresh ginger root won't keep for more than two or three weeks at room temperature or in the refrigerator.

How to freeze ginger properly:
https://www.thespruceeats.com/how-to-freeze-ginger-1388425

ilinda

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Fresh ginger root won't keep for more than two or three weeks at room temperature or in the refrigerator.

How to freeze ginger properly:
https://www.thespruceeats.com/how-to-freeze-ginger-1388425
You're probably correct about fresh ginger root not storing well, but I have a large, multi-lobed ginger root that has been in the fridge at least a month.  What I do have to do though is every week or less than a week, slide off the blue (?penicillin?) growing on a recently cut surface.  Otherwise, it is fine.

The main thing it does at this time of year (winter) is become quite fibrous.  Every time I cut some off for cooking, I notice how much more fibrous it has become, and am guessing it thinks it's time to start growing again.

 

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