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Author Topic: Some things which supposedly reverse vision loss  (Read 2758 times)

Yowbarb

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Some things which supposedly reverse vision loss
« on: February 18, 2018, 10:40:19 PM »
Consume a short list of foods and let that get rid of the free radicals threby improving vision...

Video is from video How to remove vision loss simple?

New Vide (VLF444-D-W)
« Last Edit: February 18, 2018, 11:02:43 PM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Some things which supposedly reverse vision loss
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2018, 10:51:37 PM »
I'm still watching...
info from film
Some of the foods:
kale, spinach, kiwi, eggs, kangaroo meat, shellfish and pigweed

two main nutrients: lutein and zeathanthin
..................................................................................................
reference from all about vision

The best natural food sources of lutein and zeaxanthin are green leafy vegetables and other green or yellow vegetables. Among these, cooked kale and cooked spinach top the list, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Non-vegetarian sources of lutein and zeaxanthin include egg yolks.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2018, 11:01:50 PM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Some things which supposedly reverse vision loss
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2018, 11:05:32 PM »

Yowbarb

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R.R. Book

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Re: Some things which supposedly reverse vision loss
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2018, 04:18:39 AM »
A good little insurance policy is to take chewable Occuvite.  There is a generic that is much less expensive as well.


Yowbarb

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Re: Some things which supposedly reverse vision loss
« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2018, 08:02:57 PM »
A good little insurance policy is to take chewable Occuvite.  There is a generic that is much less expensive as well.



Great idea... not sure why I haven't tried this yet.
thanks for the reminder!
- Yowbarb

Yowbarb

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Re: Some things which supposedly reverse vision loss
« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2018, 08:28:33 PM »
Yowbarb Note:
Well here's a surprise, corn tortillas a good source of lutein and Lutein and Zeaxanthin Tortillas have been one of my budget-stretching foods for a long time... never thought of them as particularly nutritious... I combine them with refried beans...
Links to a NIH (National Institute of Health) article and charts below:
...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3705341/   

Dietary Sources of Lutein and Zeaxanthin Carotenoids and Their Role in Eye Health

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3705341/table/nutrients-05-01169-t001/

"The aim of this article is to review recent scientific evidences supporting the benefits of lutein and zexanthin in preventing the onset of two major age-related eye diseases with diets rich in these carotenoids. The review also lists major dietary sources of lutein and zeaxanthin and refers to newly developed foods, daily intake, bioavailability and physiological effects in relation to eye health. Examples of the newly developed high-lutein functional foods are also underlined."

"Lutein and zeaxanthin are ....found at high levels in parsley, spinach, kale, egg yolk and lutein-fortified foods."

'Lutein and zeaxanthin are the most common xanthophylls in green leafy vegetables (e.g., kale, spinach, broccoli, peas and lettuce) and egg yolks. (Table 1) They are also found at relatively high levels in einkorn, Khorasan and durum wheat and corn and their food products  (Table 1). The ratio of lutein and zeaxanthin in green vegetables has been reported to range between 12 to 63, highest being in kale, while in yellow-orange fruits and vegetable this ratio ranges between 0.1 and 1.4."

"Chicken egg yolk is deemed a better source of lutein and zeaxanthin compared to fruits and vegetables because of its increased bioavailability due to the high fat content in eggs [31,32]. The concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin in chicken egg yolk are 292 ± 117 µg/yolk and 213 ± 85 µg/yolk (average weight of yolk is about 17–19 g), respectively and are likely dependent on the type of feed, found mainly in on-esterified form with minute amounts of lycopene and β-carotene [33]. It is not surprising that egg noodle had almost 6 times more xanthophyll carotenoids than lasagne "

Grains - [Yowbarb Note: The more ancient grains, available at health food stores would generally have more of the lutein and zeaxanthin.] In general carotenoids are very minor constituents in cereal grains except for einkorn and durum wheat and corn that contain relatively high levels of carotenoids or yellow pigments. The common carotenoids in cereal grains are α and β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein and zeaxanthin with lutein being the dominant carotenoid compound. In common wheat flour (low in carotenoids), the bran/gem fraction had 4-fold more lutein, 12-fold more zeaxanthin, and 2-fold more β-cryptoxanthin than the endosperm fractions.

Higher amounts of lutein were found in durum, Kamut and Khorasan (5.4–5.8 µg/g) compared with common bread and pastry wheat (2.0–2.1 µg/g). Einkorn, on the other hand, had the highest concentration of all-trans-lutein, which is influenced by environmental growing conditions and processing. Corn also contains exceptionally high levels of non-provitamin A carotenoids primarily lutein and zeaxanthin

"A randomized cross-over design study involving 33 men and women consuming 1 egg per day for 5 weeks reported increased serum lutein (26%), and zeaxanthin (38%), but serum concentrations of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and triacylglycerols were not affected."

Other foods listed in article: kiwi, colored fruits

Yowbarb

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Re: Some things which supposedly reverse vision loss
« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2018, 08:33:51 PM »
Yowbarb Note: Enkorn wheat is mentioned in the NIH article about lutein and zeaxanthin and their help for vision.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Einkorn_wheat

Einkorn wheat commonly grows wild in the hill country in the northern part of the Fertile Crescent and Anatolia although it has a wider distribution reaching into the Balkans and south to Jordan near the Dead Sea. It is a short variety of wild wheat, usually less than 70 centimetres (28 in) tall and is not very productive of edible seeds.

Yowbarb

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Re: Some things which supposedly reverse vision loss
« Reply #9 on: February 19, 2018, 08:43:09 PM »
This article mentions some sources not in other articles.
I'm glad to read this about salmon and peppers...
...

Numerous studies have identified lutein and zeaxanthin to be essential components for eye health. Lutein and zeaxanthin are carotenoid pigments that impart yellow or orange color to various common foods such as cantaloupe, pasta, corn, carrots, orange/yellow peppers, fish, salmon and eggs

R.R. Book

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Re: Some things which supposedly reverse vision loss
« Reply #10 on: February 20, 2018, 04:45:35 AM »
Quote
Chicken egg yolk is deemed a better source of lutein and zeaxanthin compared to fruits and vegetables because of its increased bioavailability due to the high fat content in eggs

Am guessing that duck eggs may be even higher in both then, as they have a greater fat content and are a deeper shade of orange.  Ducks require more greens than hens as part of their biochemistry, so when they forage, they go after the leaves more while hens are seeking bugs.  When we open the gate to allow grazing, the hens head straight for the woods, while the ducks head over to the comfrey beds!


ilinda

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Re: Some things which supposedly reverse vision loss
« Reply #11 on: February 20, 2018, 09:05:11 AM »
Yowbarb Note: Enkorn wheat is mentioned in the NIH article about lutein and zeaxanthin and their help for vision.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Einkorn_wheat

Einkorn wheat commonly grows wild in the hill country in the northern part of the Fertile Crescent and Anatolia although it has a wider distribution reaching into the Balkans and south to Jordan near the Dead Sea. It is a short variety of wild wheat, usually less than 70 centimetres (28 in) tall and is not very productive of edible seeds.
One excellent thing about einkorn is that it's an "ancient" grain, and has not been genetically altered or tweaked, by conventional or non-conventional breeding techniques (so far), and is not considered toxic or as toxic as modern-day wheat.  IIRC, it falls in the category with kamut, spelt, farro, etc., any of which I'd be OK for making sourdough flatbreads, etc.

A few years ago I got small amounts of each of the above and ground them as fine as I could and then made flatbreads out of them just for comparison.  Einkorn didn't grind as finely as spelt, but it is still something I'd feel is acceptable for our favorite sourdough flatbreads.

ilinda

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Re: Some things which supposedly reverse vision loss
« Reply #12 on: February 20, 2018, 09:08:33 AM »
Quote
Chicken egg yolk is deemed a better source of lutein and zeaxanthin compared to fruits and vegetables because of its increased bioavailability due to the high fat content in eggs

Am guessing that duck eggs may be even higher in both then, as they have a greater fat content and are a deeper shade of orange.  Ducks require more greens than hens as part of their biochemistry, so when they forage, they go after the leaves more while hens are seeking bugs.  When we open the gate to allow grazing, the hens head straight for the woods, while the ducks head over to the comfrey beds!


Beautiful eggs!

In Carol Deppe's book, The Resilient Gardener, she talks about duck eggs being one of the most nutritious foods!  She goes into some detail about why and your post here reminds me to go re-read that section in the book. 

R.R. Book

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Re: Some things which supposedly reverse vision loss
« Reply #13 on: February 20, 2018, 09:18:28 AM »
Am excited to get back on the subject of Deppe's methods after a long winter away from the garden!  :)

R.R. Book

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Re: Some things which supposedly reverse vision loss
« Reply #14 on: February 20, 2018, 09:42:41 AM »
Speaking of ancient grains, have you read The Lost Crops of the Incas?  Some useful species were preserved in the Andes, some of which can be grown here.  Here is a link for free reading, with grains beginning on p. 128 of the book:

https://www.nap.edu/read/1398/chapter/15


 

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