Being In It for the Species The Kolbrin Bible Complete Danjeon Breathing System 
Surviving the Planet X Tribulation

Author Topic: Food shortages materializing  (Read 5631 times)

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 33387
  • Karma: +26/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Food shortages materializing
« Reply #30 on: February 02, 2019, 03:46:20 PM »
Logic Before Authority presents a film clip of the head of our government negotiating with China to provide them 5 million tons of soybeans per day, when the total tonnage grown in the U.S. is 320,000 per day, in a year with somewhat normal weather patterns. 

GMO concerns aside, how would that leave anything at all for U.S. citizens?

Is the U.S. beholden to China to such a degree that our crops are being put up as collateral?

Or maybe this was just a communication snafu?



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9q8YQE38JM (Logic Before Authority)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2nhbGrswvuo (Original film of the negotiation)

So much ____ going on behind the scenes, we wil have to look out for our own survival...

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7854
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Food shortages materializing
« Reply #31 on: February 02, 2019, 07:00:34 PM »
Just double-checking the stats given in the story:

Here are USDA stats expressed in "tonnes," or metric tons, which are defined here:

Quote
The British ton is the long ton, which is 2240 pounds, and the U.S. ton is the short ton which is 2000 pounds.

Both tons are actually defined in the same way. 1 ton is equal to 20 hundredweight. It is just the definition of the hundredweight that differs between countries. In the U.S. there are 100 pounds in the hundredweight, and in Britain there are 112 pounds in the hundredweight. This causes the actual weight of the ton to differ between countries.

To distinguish between the two tons, the smaller U.S. ton is called short, while the larger British ton is called long.

There is also an third type of ton called the metric ton, equal to 1000 kilograms, or approximately 2204 pounds. The metric ton is officially called tonne. The SI standard calls it tonne, but the U.S. Government recommends calling it metric ton.



https://www.iowafarmbureau.com/Article/File/get?path=Files%2Farticle-89866%2FSOYBEAN%20PROD%20EXPORTS-%2010062016%20.pdf

Page 24 of this document from the USDA shows 120 million metric tons of soybeans produced in the U.S. for the 2017/2018 fiscal year:
https://apps.fas.usda.gov/psdonline/circulars/production.pdf

So Logic's statement of there being 320,000 tons of soybeans produced per day in the U.S. equates to about 116 million tons in a year, which was correct for the 2016/2017 fiscal year, and would agree with the chart.  So the Chinese statesman's request of 5 million tons of soybeans per day from the U.S. is indeed impossible, and perhaps he meant per year instead?  However, he did place emphasis on "per day" in the film, which the President did not balk at, but maybe being agreeable on camera was a diplomatic tactic designed not to embarrass the Chinese negotiator in public?
« Last Edit: February 02, 2019, 07:20:17 PM by R.R. Book »

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 33387
  • Karma: +26/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Food shortages materializing
« Reply #32 on: February 02, 2019, 08:05:48 PM »
Just double-checking the stats given in the story:

Here are USDA stats expressed in "tonnes," or metric tons, which are defined here:

Quote
The British ton is the long ton, which is 2240 pounds, and the U.S. ton is the short ton which is 2000 pounds.

Both tons are actually defined in the same way. 1 ton is equal to 20 hundredweight. It is just the definition of the hundredweight that differs between countries. In the U.S. there are 100 pounds in the hundredweight, and in Britain there are 112 pounds in the hundredweight. This causes the actual weight of the ton to differ between countries.

To distinguish between the two tons, the smaller U.S. ton is called short, while the larger British ton is called long.

There is also an third type of ton called the metric ton, equal to 1000 kilograms, or approximately 2204 pounds. The metric ton is officially called tonne. The SI standard calls it tonne, but the U.S. Government recommends calling it metric ton.



https://www.iowafarmbureau.com/Article/File/get?path=Files%2Farticle-89866%2FSOYBEAN%20PROD%20EXPORTS-%2010062016%20.pdf

Page 24 of this document from the USDA shows 120 million metric tons of soybeans produced in the U.S. for the 2017/2018 fiscal year:
https://apps.fas.usda.gov/psdonline/circulars/production.pdf

So Logic's statement of there being 320,000 tons of soybeans produced per day in the U.S. equates to about 116 million tons in a year, which was correct for the 2016/2017 fiscal year, and would agree with the chart.  So the Chinese statesman's request of 5 million tons of soybeans per day from the U.S. is indeed impossible, and perhaps he meant per year instead?  However, he did place emphasis on "per day" in the film, which the President did not balk at, but maybe being agreeable on camera was a diplomatic tactic designed not to embarrass the Chinese negotiator in public?

ilinda thanks for doing some fact checking...
to me, this seems far-fetched, i will try to look at it again and dig deeper.

ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3826
  • Karma: +32/-0
Re: Food shortages materializing
« Reply #33 on: February 03, 2019, 09:36:25 AM »
Thank you Barb, but it was actually RR Book who did all the research.

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7854
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Food shortages materializing
« Reply #34 on: February 13, 2019, 06:40:03 PM »
What was missing from the grocery store this morning (Wednesday), perhaps because of the winter storm earlier this week:

Potatoes
Bananas

Other items barely stocked.

What shortages have you noticed in your own market?  Please share.



Jimfarmer

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7877
  • Karma: +23/-2
Re: Food shortages materializing
« Reply #35 on: February 13, 2019, 08:26:40 PM »
Quote
What shortages have you noticed in your own market?  Please share.

Roma tomatoes
Pecan pies

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 33387
  • Karma: +26/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Food shortages materializing
« Reply #36 on: February 14, 2019, 02:50:18 AM »
Thank you Barb, but it was actually RR Book who did all the research.

OK, just saw this. :)

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7854
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Food shortages materializing
« Reply #37 on: February 14, 2019, 05:16:33 AM »
Quote
pecan pies

The priority of a true Southerner!  :)

Nearly 1,000 calories per slice!

« Last Edit: February 14, 2019, 06:51:27 AM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7854
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Food shortages materializing
« Reply #38 on: February 22, 2019, 06:09:00 AM »
Linking a valuable "boots on the ground" post from Solani as to how the grocery stores in Canada are looking right now:

https://planetxtownhall.com/index.php/topic,7054.msg110003.html#msg110003
« Last Edit: February 22, 2019, 06:22:11 AM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7854
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Food shortages materializing
« Reply #39 on: March 04, 2019, 12:03:05 PM »
David Dubyne reports that for the first time in recent history, the worldwide demand for wheat has increased simultaneously with a double decrease in other wheat statistics: less being successfully grown and harvested, and less remaining in storage from the previous growing season.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xdM089X-LbA

He also urges everyone to experiment with growing a portion of their diet, as some of what we grow will fail, and we need to learn from those failures now before the time comes that we are more dependent upon what we grow ourselves for surival.

David provides a link to "20 vegetables with the most protein content."
https://www.eatthis.com/vegetables-protein-content/

These range from roughly .8 grams of protein per serving to 8 grams.  In contrast, a college nutrition professor will typically insist that protein content needs to be in the double digits in order to count as one full serving of protein, with 50 or 60 grams needed daily by adults.

Ranking, most to least protein:

1. peas
2. potatoes
3. collard greens
4. squash
5. spinach
6. asparagus
7. corn
8. sweet potato
9. Brussels sprouts
10. mushrooms
11. broccoli
12. beet greens
13. broccoli rabe
14. avocado
15. cauliflower
16. zucchini
17. kale
18. red bell pepper
19. carrots
20. eggplant

I was really surprised about collard greens being so high in protein, and pleasantly surprised that the northern permaculture crop asparagus is also somewhat high.



« Last Edit: March 04, 2019, 12:19:55 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3826
  • Karma: +32/-0
Re: Food shortages materializing
« Reply #40 on: March 04, 2019, 02:42:28 PM »
I did specifically look last weekend at the shelves at Walmart Supercenter,  Farmington, MO, and saw full shelves, except for some brand of electrolyte drink sort of like Gatorade?  Those shelves were nearly empty with a few cartons. 

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7854
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Food shortages materializing
« Reply #41 on: March 04, 2019, 04:39:18 PM »
Thanks for the report Ilinda!

We visit Walmart about 4 times a year to stock mineral-infused sunflower seeds in bulk for the hens, and are planning to do so again soon.  Will check how the shelves in general look and report back.


R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7854
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Food shortages materializing
« Reply #42 on: March 05, 2019, 11:27:43 AM »
Just following up with a report on how the Walmart looked today, as it was our first time visiting that store since some time in 2018:

Meats were very spotty, with one of the large horizontal open freezers almost completely empty.

Otherwise, the store seemed fairly well stocked here as well.

I did notice that the friendly greeters were missing, and that a number of staffed check-out lanes had been replaced with more and larger self-checkout stations with full-sized conveyor belts.  So staff seem to have been down-sized.

Hope you all keep up the good reporting!  :)
« Last Edit: March 05, 2019, 12:49:05 PM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7854
  • Karma: +21/-0
Re: Food shortages materializing
« Reply #43 on: March 07, 2019, 11:17:36 AM »
Ice Age Farmer quoted economist Martin Armstrong today as making a startling statement:

Quote
The [creators of] indexes put out by the banks on commodities were told to remove agricultural products...
~Martin Armstrong in his blog, March 6, 2019

https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/markets-by-sector/agriculture/government-ordering-agriculture-be-removed-from-commodity-indexes/

That is shocking to anyone who studies economic trends, as agricultural production has historically comprised one of three legs of the commodities marketplace, with the other two being metals and energy.

So from this point forward, all aggregated commodities stats will be not only hollowed out, but also incomparable with historic commodities data, meaning that newer data can no longer be used to study longer-term economic trends.

My thought on that: Data itself is one of the most valuable commodities in the Information Age, though sale of it isn't included on the Commodities Price Index.  Statistics provide a foundation upon which important decisions affecting contemporary society are made.  If data is being suppressed or outright gutted in the 21st Century, then one wonders what PTB know that they are not sharing with us...in other words:

Are PTB indicating that they are no longer interested in studying long-term trends, because something is about to take place in which all of that meticulously accumulated information is about to become meaningless, or possibly dangerous?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wKn2TQAI-g @ around 8:00

See also:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodity_price_index

« Last Edit: March 07, 2019, 06:30:20 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3826
  • Karma: +32/-0
Re: Food shortages materializing
« Reply #44 on: March 07, 2019, 04:32:41 PM »
This surely could be the first year we see shortages of some of the crops we import, and maybe even some grown here.  Thinking of how the winter wheat was damaged not that many months ago in the northern U.S. by IIRC too much rain at planting time?  Or was it some other reason?  Anyway, it was problematic for certain.

It will get worse.

 

Surviving the Planet X Tribulation: A Faith-Based Leadership Guide

Radio Free Earth: Community Preparedness and Two Way Radios

BUY NOW

In a post-global disaster world, predators and tyrants will have the best two-way radios, and they'll use them to surveil you at a comfortable distance.

What will you have? Signal flares and red bandannas?

If so, when you least expect it, the predators and tyrants will come to take a spoil and they will torture, rape, and kill without mercy.

This is why Radio Free Earth authors Marshall Masters and Duane W. Brayton have an urgent message for everyone with a serious interest in preparedness. That being, analog RF (radio frequency) is the heartbeat of freedom. Accept no substitutes.

Watch our free videos to learn how to stay safe and free with an affordable strategy for two way communication, both near and far.

Welcome to Radio
Free Earth

Why Radio
Free Earth

Post-Disaster
Communications

Citizens Band Radios
for Survival

BUY NOW