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Author Topic: batteries  (Read 469 times)

Socrates

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R.R. Book

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Re: batteries
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2018, 04:16:42 AM »
Very interesting Soc!  I did not know that Edison developed this battery, or that he produced the first electric cars which were favored over gas at one time.

Wikipedia explains that these are ideal in an application that supplies a continuous charge, as they lose their charge easily.  Lots of positives:

Quote
It is a very robust battery which is tolerant of abuse, (overcharge, overdischarge, and short-circuiting) and can have very long life even if so treated.[7] It is often used in backup situations where it can be continuously charged and can last for more than 20 years.

Quote
...ability to withstand vibration, high temperatures and other physical stress. They are being examined again for use in wind and solar power systems where battery weight is not important.

One drawback in a garage appears to be hydrogen off-gassing.

The article says that Edison's company produced these batteries from 1903-1972, then Exide bought the rights and produced them from 1972-1975.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nickel%E2%80%93iron_battery

MadMax

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Re: batteries
« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2018, 07:36:50 AM »
My friend Oscar (who coordinated the Ham radio emergency communications effort with the Red Cross ) in Puerto Rico. Actually used the method described in this article during the first few weeks after the Hurricane hit to generate electrical power from his Toyota Prius for the first few weeks when there was no power on the island.

Tips for using a car battery as a power source in the home when SHTF!

http://bugout.news/2018-05-25-tips-for-using-a-car-battery-as-a-power-source-in-the-home-when-shtf.html

If you have enough time to prepare, you might have access to an emergency power source and even a backup, such as a generator or solar panels, when you lose power after SHTF.

However, if for any reason these aren’t available to you or they become unusable, you need to know how to turn a car battery into an emergency power source during a blackout. While it won’t be powerful enough to generate electricity for your whole house, this method will do in a pinch.

How to turn a car battery into an emergency power source

Before you begin, review each step carefully. While it looks small and harmless, a car battery stores a lot of energy. The DC power it contains will electrify you if you’re not careful. (Related: Long-term blackouts are a harsh reality: 7 scary challenges you probably aren’t prepared for.)

You will need the following tools:

Electrical tape — Get tape that has a UL rating to make safe connections.
Flashlight and candle — You’ll need this if you have to fix lamps in the dark.
Crimping tools — Used to affix wires to the car battery.
Measuring tape
A multimeter — A multimeter can test circuits, isolate problems, and verify that stray currents aren’t flowing through anything they’re not supposed to.
Screwdrivers (Flat-blade and Phillips)
Wire cutters — These will help you cut the wires to the desired length. Wire cutters will also help keep connections tidy since surplus wire can make unwanted contacts.
When you have all the tools you need, get a power inverter that has a cable with crocodile clips. Inverters will turn the current from the battery into electricity that your appliances can use.

Since car batteries put out 12-volt DC current, they can’t power appliances. The voltage is too low (appliances need at least 100 volts), and AC power is dangerous. The constant output will kill at a much lower voltage than DC. With an inverter, you can convert a car battery’s steady output to AC while also increasing it up to 110-volt. A power inverter also has a standard power outlet that you can plug things into.

To connect the car battery to the power inverter, locate the positive and negative terminals of the battery. These have markings embossed beside the terminals.

Fasten the black lead from the inverter to the negative terminal, then connect the red lead to the positive. Now you can plug in small appliances like a lamp to the inverter.

You’ll need to remember these safety tips when you’re using a car battery as an emergency power source:

Put the battery in a safe and dry location. If the ground is wet, place the battery on a stable platform so it stays dry. Maintain at least a foot of clear space around the battery and above it.

Keep metal away from the terminals. If conductive material touches both terminals at the same time, you may experience a short circuit which can blow up the battery. This might even cause acid to spray all over you or your home.

Do not overload the battery. Small power tools can stay plugged in, but anything as large as your fridge might make the battery overheat and explode.

Never daisy-chain extension leads from the inverter. It can power several 40-watt lamps, but don’t try running several tools like a drill and saw at the same time to avoid overloading the battery.

If you need an emergency power source, car batteries are some of the cheapest options at your disposal. Knowing how to convert a car battery into a power source can help you survive a power outage, especially if it lasts for a couple of days or so.

Max.
"Ignorance is Bliss" - (Agent Smith the first Matrix Movie)

MadMax

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Re: batteries
« Reply #3 on: June 03, 2018, 08:38:33 AM »
Good Article!

Here’s why you should start using D size batteries again

http://bugout.news/2018-05-04-heres-why-you-should-start-using-d-size-batteries-again.html

Back in the days when flashlights guzzled power, the only battery fit for the job was the massive D size battery. Times have changed and LED flashlights either use smaller batteries or have their own internal battery. But the D size battery has some big advantages that preppers and survivalists can take advantage of, according to an article on Modern Survival Blog.

Invented in 1898, the D size battery was designed to be so big and store so much power because early portable electric devices required that much electricity. The most notorious example were flashlights made before the adoption of light-emitting diodes (LEDs).

Most old flashlights used incandescent light bulbs. The good old incandescent bulbs burned through a lot of power. The only battery that could supply that heavy electrical demand over a long period of time was the D size battery.

A D size battery stores a much larger amount of energy than an AA. The modern alkaline D battery keeps 12,000 mAh, while the AA equivalent stores 2,700 mAh. That one D cell is equal to four and a half AA cells. That’s the kind of power old flashlights needed.

Upgrade your old D size battery flashlight with LED bulbs

Then came the LED revolution. The new bulbs could match the brightness of the strongest incandescent bulb while needing much less electrical power.

The AA battery could meet the reduced demands of the energy-efficient LED flashlights. So the old incandescent flashlight fell out of favor, and with it fell the D size battery.

But the D size isn’t dead yet. Indeed, the same LED technology that displaced the incandescent flashlight could bring the big battery back.

As already mentioned, LED flashlights need much less power than their predecessors. An AA battery is enough to run one. So you can imagine how long a modern flashlight will last if it’s powered by huge D cell batteries.

Now you’re probably thinking that modern-day LED flashlights are too small to use a D size. And they are.

However, you also probably have at least one of the bigger, older flashlights stored in the glove compartment of your car or tucked away in a cupboard at home. And chances are, you picked a Maglite because they look cool, are nearly indestructible, and double as a handy bludgeon.

Those older models of flashlights use D size batteries because of their power-hungry incandescent bulbs. You can swap out the incandescent bulbs of those old flashlights for newer LED ones. Doing so will let the energy-efficient LED bulb take full advantage of the D size batteries’ huge energy reserves for a much longer time. (Related: New LED lighting technology embraced by consumers, Total Cost of Ownership saves money over incandescent, fluorescent bulbs.)

Even running the brightest LED replacement bulbs, D size battery-powered flashlights will enjoy twice the endurance of the smaller units. And when you’re in the wilderness or a deserted area, that extra couple of hours can spell the difference between safety and danger.

Think long-term by getting rechargeable D size batteries

To get the most out of your upgraded flashlight, consider getting rechargeable D size batteries. Rechargeable cells have smaller storage capacities than disposable counterparts; for example, the EBL brand recommended by Modern Survival Blog is rated at 10,000 mAh, whereas the alkaline one averages at 12,000 mAh.

But you’ll get much more use out of rechargeable batteries in the long run. Rechargeable cells can be reused hundreds of times, which saves you money and also reduces your trash.

Since you’re getting rechargeable batteries, make sure to get a versatile charger than can accept different sizes of cells.

Max.

"Ignorance is Bliss" - (Agent Smith the first Matrix Movie)

R.R. Book

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Re: batteries
« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2018, 08:52:36 AM »
Thanks so much for that practical tip Max!

Socrates

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Re: D batteries
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2018, 05:47:22 AM »
together we may need to rethink 'batteries'...
Thanks, Max [applaud]

In the end, indeed, light may be the difference between life and death; a story...
I went out on a short camel safari into the Sahara. All day on the camel [imagine what that does to yer ass!] Then the Tunesian guide makes us [me and my gf] a bread baked in sand. Quaint, yes?
Then we're sitting around the campfire, sharing songs we (barely) remember and along comes a spider... Except, no, it was a scorpion. A rather large one. And then the campfire goes out...
I did not sleep a wink that whole night, huddled up in my sleeping bag and hoping to god that no arachnid [i have arachniphopia; doesn't help...] found a nice warm spot somewhere around me.
My point is this: with the dying of the campfire all light was also gone. And there was no way to get any light in this (dire) situation. Since then, i make sure i have 2 things with me at all times during any situation that (even remotely) reminds me of the one described above:
- light
- a mosquito net

Please allow me to elaborate.
As many peoples in the world will attest to, during the day one is bothered by flies, followed by an half hour interlude, replaced by mosquitoes. During this half hour, many peoples around the world take a dip in the local pond, etc. For many folks, this is a way of life: flies, intermission, mosquitoes...
Did you know most ancient African cultures were situated above the mosquito line? I.E. there is an altitude above which mosquitoes will not go and this is where Africans would build their cities. However and unforunately, when too many people [i.e. slaves...] started populating the African continent, this wise tradition was abandoned... Did you know malaria is the greatest killer in the world? Did you know that many more whole families are weighed down by the caring of malaria-infected family members?
Anyway, Africa didn't use to have this problem, for people would live above the mosquito line.

But forget malaria... Did you ever get a good night's rest while being hounded by mosquitoes?
Therefore, have a mosquito net with you at all times while traversing into the wild and have some kind of light with you at night. Unfortunately, i have experienced that even the wildest forms of wildlife will actually not be scared away by (even very bright) light, but at least you'll see your surroudings and have some peace inside the safety of your tent or mosquito net.
The mosquito net will keep ants, other bugs, snakes and anything else away from you night and day. A flashlight will allow you to survey your area at night (or while you go out to take a pee) and allow you to continue your sleep without laying awake wondering wtf made that noise...
These are very practical issues that you don't need to be dealing with in a survival situation [when you need all the sleep and destress you can manage].
« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 06:09:21 AM by Socrates »
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R.R. Book

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Re: batteries
« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2018, 07:17:05 AM »
What an amazing trip that you and GF took!  I guess you can't post-trot on a camel; hence the sore backside.

A family member in Arizona has been repeatedly stung by those especially nasty small scorpions with the more-toxic stings, simply by putting on shoes that weren't shaken out first or climbing into bed.  She learned the hard way what you already know about carrying a flashlight  :-X

People in malaria territory might do well to plant Sweet Annie artemisia and eat one leaf per day - especially children who are still developing their immunity to malaria (highest fatality age-bracket).  Artemisia has been vetted in clinical trials as being more effective vs. malaria than quinine.

The netting also sounds like good advice.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 09:45:24 AM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: batteries
« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2018, 06:02:37 AM »
Manual on battery reconditioning, link provided courtesy of
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Nv248Vs8vc

http://www.dbit.co.uk/BatteryReconditioning.Pdf


ilinda

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Re: D batteries
« Reply #8 on: June 05, 2018, 05:50:54 PM »
Since then, i make sure i have 2 things with me at all times during any situation that (even remotely) reminds me of the one described above:
- light
- a mosquito net
Excellent advice, even for those not travelling in mosquito or scorpion territory.  Bugs are bugs, and many of them really like to bite and/or sting us for various reasons.  And even in the dead of winter, the light is totally essential.

Often when I'm just driving a short distance, I often contemplate a "what if" situation where I'm stranded, cannot phone home, and must walk many miles to get home--at night.  The thought does make me grab a flashlight if one isn't already in the vehicle or purse.

 

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